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Topic: 127 BC


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In the News (Tue 22 Jan 19)

  
  Hipparchus - Crystalinks
Also it is known that the Babylonian priest known as Berossus wrote around 281 BC a book in Greek on the (rather mythological) history of Babylonia, the Babyloniaca, for the new ruler Antiochus I; it is said that later he founded a school of astrology on the Greek island of Kos.
After that, in 135 BC, enthusiastic about a nova in the constellation of Scorpius, he measured with an equatorial armillary sphere ecliptical coordinates of about 1,000 stars (the exact number is not known) for his star catalogue.
Hipparchus had in 134 BC ranked stars in six magnitude classes according to their brightness: he assigned the value of 1 to the twenty brightest stars, to weaker ones a value of 2, and so forth to the stars with a class of 6, which can be barely seen with the naked eye.
www.crystalinks.com /hipparchus.html   (6093 words)

  
  Hipparchus
Hipparchus (Greek Ἳππαρχος) (circa 190 BC – circa 120 BC) was a Greek astronomer, geographer, and mathematician.
After that in 135 BC, enthusiastic about a nova star in the constellation of Scorpius, he measured with an equatorial armillary sphere ecliptical coordinates of about 850 (falsely quoted elsewhere as 1600 or 1080) and in 129 BC he made first big star catalogue.
Hipparchus had in 134 BC ranked stars in six magnitude classes according to their brightness: he assigned the value of 1 to the 20 brightest stars, to weaker ones a value of 2, and so forth to the stars with a class of 6, which can be barely seen with the naked eyes.
www.nebulasearch.com /encyclopedia/article/Hipparchus.html   (6430 words)

  
 Hipparchus (c. 190-120 BC)   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-10-15)
Hipparchus or Hipparchos of Nicaea did his observations from Rhodes between 146 and 127 BC.
He was the first astronomer who compiled a catalog of 850 stars; this work was perhaps triggered by the observation of a "New Star" (Nova) in the constellation Scorpius in 134 BC (according to Roman historian Pliny).
To remarkable acuracy, he obtained measurements of the value of precession, the length of the year, and (from eclipse observations) the distance of the Moon.
www.seds.org /messier/xtra/Bios/hipparchus.html   (126 words)

  
 Encyclopedia: Hipparchus   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-10-15)
The exact dates of his life are not known, but Ptolemy attributes astronomical observations to him from 147 BC to 127 BC; earlier observations since 162 BC might also be made by him.
Also it is known that the Babylonian priest known as Berossus wrote around 281 BC a book in Greek on the (rather mythological) history of Babylonia, the Babyloniaca, for the new ruler Antiochus I; it is said that later he founded a school of astrology on the Greek island of Kos.
After that in 135 BC, enthusiastic about a nova star in the constellation of Scorpius, he measured with an equatorial armillary sphere ecliptical coordinates of about 850 stars (falsely quoted elsewhere as 1600 or 1080) and in 129 BC he made his star catalogue.
www.nationmaster.com /encyclopedia/Hipparchus   (6580 words)

  
 Ptolemaic dynasty - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-10-15)
Ptolemy VI Philometor (180 BC-164 BC, 163 BC-145 BC) married Cleopatra II, briefly ruled jointly with in 152 BC
Ptolemy VIII (170 BC-163 BC, 145 BC-116 BC) Euergetes II (Physcon) married Cleopatra II then Cleopatra III; temporarily expelled from Alexandria by Cleopatra II between 131 BC and 127 BC, reconciled with her in 124 BC.
Cleopatra VII Thea Neotera (51 BC-30 BC) ruled jointly with Ptolemy XIII (51 BC-47 BC), Ptolemy XIV (47 BC-44 BC) and Ptolemy XV Caesarion (44 BC-30 BC).
www.lighthousepoint.us /project/wikipedia/index.php/Ptolemaic_dynasty   (551 words)

  
 Skyscript: The Copernican Revolution by David Plant
Finally Aristarchus of Samos (c.310-c.250 BC), the last of the Pythagorean astronomers, reasoned that the motions of the celestial bodies could all be explained by assuming that the Sun rather than the Earth stood at the centre.
Later generations of astronomers and mathematicians were saddled with the task of devising a theory of planetary motion that could explain such awkward anomalies as retrograde motion and the apparent variations in the brilliance of the planets, yet remain within the prescribed requirements of a fixed central Earth with circular planetary orbits and uniform speeds.
Aristotle (c.384-c.322 BC) was a disciple of Plato but later rejected his abstract idealism in favour of a more pragmatic approach, insisting that all speculation must be based upon observation, analysis and systematic research.
www.skyscript.co.uk /copernicus.html   (2448 words)

  
 Timeline related to Greek Science and Technology 1/2
About 480 BC Parmenides of Elea (Παρμενίδης ο Ελεάτης) founded the Eleatic School where he taught that 'all is one,' not an aggregation of units as Pythagoras had said, and that to arrive at a true statement, logical argument is necessary.
About 330 BC Heraclides of Pontus said that the earth turns daily on its axis "while the heavenly things were at rest..., considered the cosmos to be infinite..., [and] with the Pythagoreans, considered each planet to be a world with an earth-like body and with an atmosphere" (Dreyer 1906:123-125).
About 260-250 BC Archimedes of Syracuse contributed numerous advances to science including the principle that a body immersed in fluid is buoyed up by a force equal to the weight of the displaced fluid and the calculation of the value of pi.
www.mlahanas.de /Greeks/HistoricEvents.htm   (5116 words)

  
 Hipparchus
The year 127 BC is usually cited as the last date known for his actual work, and a French astronomer, Jean-Baptiste-Joseph Delambre (1749-1822), clearly demonstrated that some observations of Hipparchus on the star Eta Canis Majoris could well have been carried out in that year.
Hipparchus had been stimulated in 134 BC by observing a "new star." Concluding that such a phenomenon indicated a lack of permanency in the number of "fixed" stars, he determined to catalog them, and no criticism was able to deflect him from his original purpose.
Hipparchus' catalog, completed in 129 BC, listed about 850 stars (not 1,080 as is often stated), the apparent brightnesses of which were specified by a system of six magnitudes similar to that used today.
abyss.uoregon.edu /~js/glossary/hipparchus.html   (1752 words)

  
 127 BC - Open Encyclopedia   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-10-15)
127 BC From open-encyclopedia.com - the free encyclopedia.
Centuries: 3rd century BC - 2nd century BC - 1st century BC
Decades: 170s BC 160s BC 150s BC 140s BC 130s BC - 120s BC - 110s BC 100s BC 90s BC 80s BC 70s BC
www.open-encyclopedia.com /127_BC   (78 words)

  
 Parthian Ruler List
Elected leader of the Parni in about 248 BC and defeated Andragoras, the Seleucid satrap of Parthia, in about 238 BC.
Regained Parthian independence after Antiochus III's defeat by the Romans in 189 BC and began to expand the kingdom.
Re-established strong central control in Parthia and influence in Armenian affairs, and was responsible for defeating Roman ambitions in the east, most notably with the defeat of Crassus at Carrhae in 53 BC.
americanhistory.si.edu /collections/numismatics/parthia/frames/prulfm.htm   (1456 words)

  
 The Parthian period (
His troops moved north and occupied Babylon and Seleucia probably sometime in 127 BC, when the Parthians were fighting nomadic invaders in the eastern part of their territory.
In 95 BC the Armenian king Tigranes II, a hostage at the court of Mithradates, was placed on the throne of Armenia by his Parthian overlord, and the small kingdoms of northern Mesopotamia--Adiabene, Gordyene, and Osroene--gave allegiance to Mithradates.
Mithradates II died about 87 BC, although he may have died earlier, since the period after 90 BC is dark and a usurper named Gotarzes may have ruled for a few years in Mesopotamia.
www.angelfire.com /nt/Gilgamesh/parthian.html   (2485 words)

  
 Hipparchus - Ancient Astronomy   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-10-15)
Hipparchus (Greek Ἳππαρχος) (circa 190 BC - circa 120 BC) was a Greek astronomer, geographer, and mathematician.
B.C. and less than 0.1s in Hipparchus' time.
He stated they had around 330 BC an estimation for the length of the sidereal year to be SK = 365d 6h 11m (= 365.2576388d) with an error of (about) 110s.
home.comcast.net /~neburoker1/Hipparchus.htm   (6462 words)

  
 THE PTOLEMAIC PERIOD
Ptolemy I Soter I (ruled 305-285 BC) was the founder of the Ptolemaic line, and he took the Egyptian throne after the death of Alexander IV.
Eventually, a propaganda campaign by Octavian and the actions of Cleopatra VII, the daughter of Ptolemy XII, and the sister-wife of Ptolemy XIII, provided an ideal pretext for the Romans to conquer Egypt.
During the Ptolemaic period and the subsequent Roman period, Alexandria was a thriving and cosmopolitan city, and by the mid-first century BC had a population of around half a million, including substantial numbers of Greeks and Jews.
www.egyptologyonline.com /ptolemies.htm   (1107 words)

  
 Greatest emporium in the world
Up to the time of Alexander the Great (Pella, 356 BC – Babylone, 323 BC), Egypt lacked permanent, suitable harbours on its northern coast, as those landing-places located at the mouth of some branches of the Delta (best known of which were the ones at Canopus and Pelusium) were of a temporary nature.
The date 116 BC of these Latin inscriptions is of special interest because it coincides with an event of global significance, namely the discovery of the monsoon winds in the Indian Ocean by Alexandrian navigators.
It is also perhaps not entirely irrelevant that in 55 BC, the Senate decided to send Gabinius at the head of a Roman army to restore Auletes to his throne and remain in Alexandria for the protection of the king against possible future revolts.
www.unesco.org /csi/pub/source/alex5.htm   (2691 words)

  
 Great Wall of China - Wikitravel
The First Great Wall was ordered built in 214 BC by Qin Shi Huangdi after he had finished consolidating his rule and creating a unified China for the first time.
After the emperor finished adding more regions under his rule in 127 BC, he ordered a major expansion program that created the Second Great Wall, outposts in Zhangye, Wuwei, Jiuquan, Dunhuang and Yumenguan in Gansu Province and Lopnor and other outposts in Xinjiang Province.
The Great Wall was extended down the Hexi Corridor through which the Silk Road traders would travel on the way to and from the West.
wikitravel.org /en/Great_Wall_of_China   (1972 words)

  
 Hipparchus   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-10-15)
If these are indeed as they appear we can say with certainty that Hipparchus was in Alexandria in 146 BC and in Rhodes near the end of his career in 127 BC and 126 BC.
His star catalogue, probably completed in 129 BC, has been claimed to have been used by Ptolemy as the basis of his own star catalogue.
They claim that the data was taken from on a star catalogue constructed around 140 BC based on observations accurate to a third of a degree or even better.
www-gap.dcs.st-and.ac.uk /~history/Mathematicians/Hipparchus.html   (2396 words)

  
 Thorens TD 127
A member of the Analog-Forum offered a TD 127 BC (without tonearm) for a very reasonable price, and because I’m a lover of Thorens turntables - and especially the ones with 12-inch-tonearm-capability - I definitely could not resist to write him immediately.
The guy I bought the TD 127 from had a Lustre 9-inch tonearm in use and therefore had made an extra armboard, so I got the original mahogany armboard drilled for the SME 3012 in pristine condition.
But since I wanted to use the TD 127 with a 3012 the way to go was clear - the Garrard 301 would loose his tonearm, at least until the moment I can put my hands on another 12-inch SME (or maybe a nice Fidelity Research - hey, I’m just dreaming...).
www.analogue-classics.com /html/thorens_td_127.html   (550 words)

  
 Dr. J's On-Line Survey of Audio-Visual Resources for Classics: Greek Music   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-10-15)
Euripides: Choral ode from "Orestes" (c.408 BC) Vienna papyrus G 2315; 12.
The world's oldest notated music from 1950 B.C. to A.D. 300 found at Ugarit, Nippur, Oxyrhynchus and elsewhere, performed on voices and copies of ancient instruments including the trichordon, lyre, angle harp, double reedpipes, double idioglottic reedpipes, vertical flute, kithara, tympanon, barrel drum, hourglass drum, Egyptian trumpet, long-necked lute, kymbala, kroupeza, and others.
BC); 2.Mesomedes: Hymn to the Sun (1st c.
lilt.ilstu.edu /drjclassics2/Files/greekmusic.shtm   (680 words)

  
 122 Bc   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-10-15)
After stopping Wake Forest, BC moved to the Wake Forest 26 when linebacker Aaron...
BC fell behind 17-0 on a wet and windy day when it had five...
BC trailed 30-21 with 3:24 left when Matt Ryan replaced Quinton Porter for the...
www.wikiverse.org /122-bc   (256 words)

  
 [No title]   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-10-15)
4 2/140 M3039 581 Jasper Blake Victoria BC
127 5/54 M5059 431 Al Dubeta Edmonton AB
175 12/92 F3039 127 Victoria Dodd Calgary AB
www.triathlon.ab.ca /Results/2004%20Results/gwn04res.htm   (5802 words)

  
 Middle East Open Encyclopedia: Parthians   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-10-15)
Parthian Empire at its greatest extent, c60 BC.
The Parthian Empire was the dominating force on the Iranian plateau beginning in the late 3rd century BCE, and intermittently controlled Mesopotamia between ca 190 BCE and 224 CE.
The Parthians were apparently very intent on maintaining good relations with China and also sent their own embassies, starting around 110 BC: "When the Han envoy first visited the kingdom of Anxi (Parthia), the king of Anxi dispatched a party of 20,000 horsemen to meet them on the eastern border of the kingdom...
www.baghdadmuseum.org /ref/index.php?title=Parthians   (3060 words)

  
 Chinese Dynasties - Western Han Dynasty
The despotic rule was finally ended in 207 BC by an uprising led by Liu Bang, a minor official, which overthrew the Qin.
Emperor Wu succeeded to the throne in 140 BC and his reign is one of the most celebrated in Chinese history.
He sent three expeditions against the Xiongnu in 127 BC, 121 BC and 119 BC respectively.
www.travelchinaguide.com /intro/history/han/western.htm   (1429 words)

  
 127 BC - TheBestLinks.com - Centuries, Decades, 1st century BC, 2nd century BC, ...   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-10-15)
127 BC - TheBestLinks.com - Centuries, Decades, 1st century BC, 2nd century BC,...
127 BC, Centuries, Decades, 1st century BC, 2nd century BC, 3rd century BC, 132...
You can add this article to your own "watchlist" and receive e-mail notification about all changes in this page.
www.thebestlinks.com /127_BC.html   (137 words)

  
 127 BC   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-10-15)
127 BC Centuries : 3rd centuryBC - 2nd century BC - 1st century BC
Decades : 170s BC 160s BC 150s BC 140s BC 130s BC - 120sBC - 110s BC 100s BC 90s BC 80s BC 70s BC
Years : 132 BC 131 BC 130 BC 129 BC 128 BC - 127 BC - 126 BC 125 BC 124 BC 123 BC 122 BC
www.therfcc.org /127-bc-53463.html   (82 words)

  
 Commodity Prices in Babylon 385 - 61 BC
From a couple of very late texts (127-119 BC) we know that the job was hereditary on condition that the scholars were capable to do the job.
In 127 BC, however, he entered the service of the short-lived king Hyspaosines of Characene, after which he drew "supplies at the royal gate," and apparently lost his income as astronomer.
His ration was also 1 mina of silver and in his case, too, the ration was later divided among his sons, at first 20 shekels to each of his three sons, then after the fourth had approached court, 15 shekels to each of the four sons.
www.iisg.nl /hpw/babylon.php   (6526 words)

  
 All Empires - The Xiong Nu Empire   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-10-15)
In 85 BC, the Wu Huan and Ding Lin rebelled and defeated the weakened Xiong Nu.
In 41 BC, Zhi Zhi built a fortified capital in the valley of Talas.
After Ho Han Yeh's death in 31 BC, the Eastern Xiong Nu re-gained their power and eventually overthrew the Han protectorate in 18 BC under the rule of Yu Chang Yu.
www.allempires.com /empires/xiongnu/xiongnu1.htm   (1701 words)

  
 WildWinds DataBank, Roman Coins Index by Sear RCV [1988] Number
Roman Republic, Quadrigatus-Didrachm, 215-213 BC, at the time of the 2nd Punic War.
Anonymous, AE uncia, (10.85g) 217-215 BC, Helmeted head of Roma left, pellet behind.
Anonymous AE quadrans, (16.75g) 215-212 BC, Head of Hercules in lion skin right, three pellets behind.
www.wildwinds.com /coins/sear/i.html   (9451 words)

  
 Map Northern BC
Hazelton is the oldest surviving pioneer community in Northwest BC.
Northern BC offers its visitors unlimited adventures by foot, by car and by rail, the northern communities are surrounded by an unspoiled masterpiece collection of rivers, valleys and lakes.
Don't worry in Northern BC, the First Nation's people proudly display their culture in a variety of sites and events within our boundaries, and take much effort to educate others about their culture and heritage.
gobc.ca /Northern-BC_map_rID_127.php   (300 words)

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