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Topic: 1755 Lisbon earthquake


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In the News (Thu 18 Jul 19)

  
  Reference.com/Encyclopedia/1755 Lisbon earthquake
Lisbon was the capital of a devout Catholic country, with a history of investments in the church and evangelism in the colonies.
The concept of the sublime, though it existed before 1755, was developed in philosophy and elevated to greater importance by Immanuel Kant, in part as a result of his attempts to comprehend the enormity of the Lisbon quake and tsunami.
The geological causes of this earthquake and the seismic activity in the region continue to be discussed and debated by contemporary scientists.
www.reference.com /browse/wiki/1755_Lisbon_earthquake   (2072 words)

  
 THE GREAT LISBON EARTHQUAKE AND TSUNAMI OF 1 NOVEMBER 1755 - by Dr. George Pararas-Carayannis
It is believed that the tsunamigenic efficiency of the 1755 Lisbon earthquake was greater because of large scale subsidence caused by continent to continent convergence and compression.
Although the Lisbon earthquake of 1755 was a rare and unusual combination of seismic and tsunami events, a recurrence in the future is a certainty.
However, in the absence of adequate historical earthquake data, it is not possible to provide a statistical probability as to when an event similar to the Great Lisbon Earthquake and Tsunami of 1755 may reccur.
www.drgeorgepc.com /Tsunami1755Lisbon.html   (3553 words)

  
 Lisbon Earthquake | Lisbon Guide
Lisbon was the capital of a devout Catholic country, with a history of investments in the church and evangelisation in the colonies.
The concept of the sublime, though it existed before 1755, was developed in philosophy and elevated to greater importance by Immanuel Kant, in part as a result of his attempts to comprehend the enormity of the Lisbon quake and tsunami.
The geological causes of this earthquake and the seismic activity in the region continue to be discussed and debated by contemporary scientists.
www.lisbon-guide.info /about/lisbon_earthquake   (1683 words)

  
 O Mundo de Claudia: Earthquake!
A 5.1 earthquake was felt yesterday in Lisboa, fortunately not by me. The inhabitants of Lisbon are constantly haunted by the memory of the great earthquake of 1755 and we are always expecting some sort of catastrophe.
The inhabitants of Lisbon are constantly haunted by the memory of the great earthquake of 1755 and we are always expecting some sort of catastrophe.
Lisbon, the Portuguese capital, was the largest and the most important of the cities damaged.
claudia.weblog.com.pt /arquivo/2004/12/earthquake_1.html   (336 words)

  
 Wikinfo | Talk:1755 Lisbon earthquake   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-10-02)
FWIW, About.com has a picture of hangings in the aftermath of the earthquake, with the commentary Signs of crime, disorder, and disease are evident, and criminals are being hanged under the supervision of soldiers and priests.
Robert K. Reeves’ “The Lisbon Earthquake of 1755: Confrontation between the Church and the Enlightenment in 18th Century Portugal.
Well, the parallel with the earthquake and the decline of the Portuguese Empire is also carried by the CIA in its World Factbook:
www.internet-encyclopedia.org /wiki.php?title=Talk:1755_Lisbon_earthquake   (2341 words)

  
 1755 Lisbon earthquake at AllExperts
The earthquake accentuated political tensions in Portugal and profoundly disrupted the country's 18th century colonial ambitions.
The ruins of the Carmo convent, which was destroyed in the Lisbon earthquake.
Lisbon was the capital of a devout Catholic country, with a history of investments in the church and evangelism in the colonies.
en.allexperts.com /e/0/1755_lisbon_earthquake.htm   (2102 words)

  
 Historical Depictions of the 1755 Lisbon Earthquake
Lisbon, the Portuguese capital, was the largest and the most important of the cities damaged.
With an estimated population of 275,000, Lisbon was, in 1755, one of the largest cities in Europe.
Depictions of the Lisbon earthquake were created, copied, and widely distributed and discussed throughout all of southern, western and central Europe.
nisee.berkeley.edu /lisbon   (2535 words)

  
 Methodological Errors | The Lisbon Earthquake
The Lisbon Earthquake Error is the belief that thought arises and exists in isolation from life.
One of the most dramatic examples of life influencing thought is the Lisbon Earthquake of 1755, which produced a disaster in Lisbon, did damage for hundreds of miles around, and sent a shock wave through the thought of all of Europe, both sacred and profane.
As they were embarking in flight from the ruined city, an hour after the earthquakes, the waters of the Tagus rose menacingly and poured in three great towering waves over its banks, breaking with tremendous impact on the Lisbon quays and foreshore.
www.umass.edu /wsp/methodology/errors/lisbon.html   (1154 words)

  
 CNR-->Istituto IGG --> Articoli JCR
The source of the famous November 1st, 1755 “Lisbon” earthquake has been constrained to be an up to 200 km long structure in the offshore west of Cabo de S. Vincente, and the magnitude has been estimated in the range of 8.5-9.4.
Less well studied is the successive “Meknes” earthquake, which occurred a few days later in Morocco (November 27), and was erroneously confused by the European contemporary reports with a strong aftershock, occurred on November 18, of the main seismic sequence of the November 1st earthquake.
On November 27, 1755 a strong earthquake stroke the area of Meknes, in front of the E-W-trending Rides Prérifaines, the local external frontal thrust of the Rif.
www.cnr.it /istituti/ArticoliJCR.html?cds=043&id=22771   (756 words)

  
 1755 Lisbon earthquake - Definition, explanation
The earthquake accentuated political tensions in Portugal and profoundly disrupted the country's 18th century colonial ambitions.
Lisbon was the capital of a devout Catholic country, with a history of investments in the church and evangelisation in the colonies.
Since Lisbon is located in a centre of a tectonic plate, there are no obvious reasons for the event, since almost all tectonic events occur at plate borders.
www.calsky.com /lexikon/en/txt/1/17/1755_lisbon_earthquake.php   (1933 words)

  
 the impact of the 1755 lisbon earthquake
Because Lisbon was an important cultural, economical and political centre at the time, there is a great deal of information about the quake.
Indeed, although there are no earthquake photos of the Lisbon earthquake, there are a great deal of depictions of the event in carvings, paintings and drawings of the time.
The Lisbon earthquake is thought to be among the most violent in history: estimates measure it at about a 9.0.
www.lisbon-and-portugal.com /travel/1755-lisbon-earthquake.html   (370 words)

  
 Puerto Rico Tsunami Warning and Mitigation Program   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-10-02)
Earthquakes of this magnitude are associated with seismic fault lengths on the order of 1000 kilometers in length which are associated with subduction zones, and the fact is that the subduction zone along the eastern Caribbean islands cannot accommodate such a fault length.
He also adds that the earthquake was felt over a million square miles and that it appeared to have at least two foci, one of which in North Africa caused ground motion that damaged cities 400 miles south of Lisbon.
This is a topic of active research, but one can speculate that the eastern seaboard of the USA was spared because the fault orientation may have been approximately east-west, and it is known that most of the tsunami energy is directed perpendicular to the axis of the fault, this being so the longer the fault.
poseidon.uprm.edu /weblog-2.html   (1245 words)

  
 CHALLENGER DIVISION FOR SEAFLOOR PROCESSES
The earthquake had generated a tidal wave (known as a tsunami) that swept towards the Portuguese coast.
Most of our knowledge of the Lisbon event has been derived from historical documents, including scientific letters, poems, religious sermons, and answers to an inquiry distributed to all priests in the region by Marquez de Pombal, who was secretary of state at the time.
Well, the earthquake triggered a giant underwater avalanche on the seafloor, that flowed downslope as a turbulent mixture of sand, mud and water called a turbidity current.
www.soc.soton.ac.uk /CHD/Research/topics/lisbon.html   (514 words)

  
 ICTE-Works On-Line
This is the case, for example, of the seismic risk studies in SW Iberia where the great 1755 Lisbon earthquake analysis deeply conditions the hazard evaluation of the area.
The study of the 1755 Lisbon tsunami was accomplished on a multi-disciplinary approach involving historical, geophysical, hydrodynamical and geological studies, see Baptista et.
The tsunami generated by the 1755 earthquake is the biggest known event in this area, having deeply affected the coasts of Iberia and Morocco.
correio.cc.fc.ul.pt /~icte/tsunamie.htm   (2566 words)

  
 Channel 4 - History - Cities and disaster
Between 60,000 and 100,000 of Lisbon’s population of 275,000 were killed by the earthquake, tsunami or fire, and 85% of Lisbon’s buildings – about 18,000 of them – were destroyed.
In less than a year, Lisbon was in the throes of reconstruction, in a style – substantial squares and wide avenues – that was quite different from the medieval city that had disappeared in the rubble.
The Lisbon earthquake saw the birth of seismology – it was the first such event to be studied scientifically – and the new buildings rising in the city were the first to be ‘seismically protected’.
www.channel4.com /history/microsites/H/history/c-d/cities02.html   (866 words)

  
 Earthquake Museum-1755 Lisbon Earthquake
On November 1, 1755, Lisbon, Portugal was shaken by a large earthquake just offshore.
Lisbon was not only a city of 250,000 people but the capital of the Portuguese empire, which spread around the world.
There were some, however, who studied the earthquake objectively, observing the direction of the shocks, sequence of events and other details to try to understand scientifically what was going on.
www.olympus.net /personal/gofamily/quake/famous/lisbon.html   (295 words)

  
 Lisbon, 1755: The Earth Shook
Lisbon during the 1755 earthquake, the Tagus River in the foreground.
This was the case of the Lisbon earthquake and tsunami of 1 November 1755, in which it was said 100,000 people died, more than a third of the entire population of the Portuguese capital.
Voltaire responded to the Lisbon cataclysm, coming shortly after another deadly earthquake in Lima, Peru (1746), in a series of letters, a lengthy poem and the novella Candide, questioning blind faith in god and the fatalism that the then-dominant philosophy of “Optimism” engendered.
www.internationalist.org /lisbon1755.html   (921 words)

  
 m01homepage
Although not the strongest or most deadly earthquake in human history, the 1755 Lisbon earthquake's impact not only on Portugal but also on all of Europe was profound and lasting.
In 1755, Lisbon was one of the most beautiful cities in Europe, known for its impressive churches.
With an estimated population of 275,000, Lisbon was, in 1755, one of the largest and the most opulent city in Europe, known for its many and magnificent churches.
www.csulb.edu /~rodrigue/geog458558/lisbon   (403 words)

  
 Lisbon
Lisbon invested heavily in these ventures and the rejuvenation of the city with new road, hotel, metro and bridge schemes.
The Great Earthquake of 1755 (followed by a tidal wave and fire) destroyed most of the city's big buildings and twenty years of frantic reconstruction led to many impressive new palaces and churches and the street grid pattern spanning the seven hills of Lisbon.
Half an hour south of Lisbon dunes stretch along the Costa da Caparica and twenty kilometres north you'll pass the coastal resorts of Estoril and Cascais before reaching the lush wooded heights and royal palaces of Sintra and the monastery of Mafra, one of the most extraordinary buildings in the country.
www.portugal.com /travel/cities/lisbon.asp   (1287 words)

  
 No. 1964: Lisbon Earthquake
From a ship in Lisbon harbor, Candide watches helplessly as the good drown and the wicked survive.
For Neiman, Lisbon signals the moment God was fully and finally exiled from public affairs.
Many period images of the Lisbon catastrophe are included on the web, generally without attribution.
www.uh.edu /engines/epi1964.htm   (570 words)

  
 Lisbon - Portugal Travel and Tourism
In 1755 a massive earthquake, and subsequent tidal wave and fire, killed 40,000 and completely destroyed much of the lower central districts occasioning its rebuilding under the wise instruction of the then prime minister the Marquês de Pombal.
This district, the oldest in Lisbon and crowned with the Castle of St Jorge, is somewhat like a village within a city with labyrinthine streets inaccessible to cars, tiny grocer’s shops selling the bare essentials and people who really know each other despite living in the centre of a modern capital.
Lisbon’s relatively compact centre and variety of efficient urban transport make it highly accessible to the visitor, although pushchairs and wheelchairs can struggle with the narrow cobbled pavements which are often parked on by cars.
www.travel-in-portugal.com /Lisbon   (1283 words)

  
 53 Hotels Lisbon - Hotel Accommodation Lisbon, Portugal.
Lisbon (or Lisboa in Portuguese) is the largest city and capital of Portugal.
Almost all of its buildings are constructed after 1755 when a devastating earthquake ruined most of the medieval town.
Lisbon is also called “the city of the seven hills”.
www.stay-in-europe.org /all-Lisbon-hotels-Portugal-1.htm   (188 words)

  
 About Lisbon
The largest city in Portugal, Lisbon is a city of attractive contrasts, its past and present combining to make a capital city with a unique character, moulded and influenced by its long history and inhabitants.
Lisbon is now one of Europe’s most exciting and beautiful cities, with breathtaking architecture, world-class museums, a lively cultural scene and terrific restaurants where you can savour delicious local cuisine.
Lisbon 1 : 2 : 3 : 4 : 5 : 6 : 7
www.lisbon-hotels-portugal.net /about_lisbon.htm   (404 words)

  
 AngloINFO Lisbon - The AngloINFO Network
Built on seven hills on the north bank of the Tagus estuary, Lisbon is the westernmost capital city in Europe and enjoys one of the warmest climates.
Lisbon has always been an important port and although the docks have moved, the monuments remaining in Belém are a reminder of the city's maritime past during the Age of Discovery.
The world’s most prosperous trading centre in the 15th and 16th centuries, the city was virtually destroyed by a massive earthquake in 1755.
www.angloinfo.net /op_lisbon.aspx   (283 words)

  
 Science News Online - Tsunami! Investigating the 1755 Lisbon earthquake.
The earthquake had generated a tidal wave, a tsunami that swept towards the Portuguese coast.
The damage generated by the earthquake and the tidal wave had initiated a large number of fires across the city.
The earthquake triggered a giant underwater avalanche on the seafloor that flowed downslope as a turbulent mixture of sand, mud and water called a turbidity current.
www.science.soton.ac.uk /science_news/current_issue/index.php?link=article.php&article=13   (569 words)

  
 Exploring Earthquakes in Europe with GIS
In this earthquakes lesson, students are given a scenario where they must report on the distribution and frequency of earthquakes in Europe related to cities, political boundaries, volcanoes, and fault lines.
This represents the depth of the earthquakes in kilometers underneath the surface.
It is difficult to detect the relationship of earthquakes and faults, because of the large number of earthquakes.
rockyweb.cr.usgs.gov /outreach/globalgis/europe/earthquakes_europe.html   (6189 words)

  
 Feature
Contemporary reports state that the earthquake lasted between three-and-a-half and six minutes, causing gigantic fissures five meters wide to appear the city center.
The earthquake also destroyed major churches in Lisbon, namely the Cathedral of Santa Maria, the Basilicas of Sao Paulo, Santa Catarina, Sao Vicente de Fora, and the Misericordia Church.
Many contemporary philosophers mentioned or alluded to the earthquake in their writings, notably Voltaire in Candide and in his PoA"me sur le dA(c)sastre de Lisbonne (Poem on the Lisbon disaster).
www.dailynews.lk /2006/01/17/fea01.htm   (1391 words)

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