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Topic: 1993 Canadian election


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In the News (Mon 15 Jul 19)

  
  Canadian federal election, 1993 - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
The Canadian federal election of 1993 was held on October 25th, 1993.
The election was called by new Progressive Conservative Party leader Kim Campbell near the end of her party's five year mandate.
The 1988 election had been almost wholly focused on the issue of the Free Trade Agreement with the United States, and similarly the 1993 election was preceded by the agreement on the North American Free Trade Agreement (NAFTA).
en.wikipedia.org /wiki/Canadian_federal_election,_1993   (2613 words)

  
 Canadian Alliance - Encyclopedia.WorldSearch   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-11-06)
The Canadian Alliance's origins were in the Reform Party of Canada, which was founded in 1987 as a populist party but which moved to the right and became a conservative party shortly thereafter.
On December 8, the party was officially registered with Elections Canada, and on March 20, 2004, former Alliance leader Stephen Harper was elected as leader of the new party.
The 2004 Canadian election saw the party retain its social conservatism on matters such as same-sex marriage, but largely jettisoned were grassroots initiatives such as referendums and Senate reform.
encyclopedia.worldsearch.com /canadian_alliance.htm   (1342 words)

  
 Encyclopedia: 1993-Canadian-election   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-11-06)
The 1993 Canadian federal election, which took place on October 25th, 1993, was one of the most eventful in Canadian history.
She had replaced Brian Mulroney, who was considered one of the most unpopular Prime Ministers in Canadian history because of his failed constitutional reforms and the poor state of the Canadian economy.
1993 was one of only two elections in Canadian history (the other was 1997) where the official Opposition did not have the majority of the opposition's seats.
www.nationmaster.com /encyclopedia/1993_Canadian_election   (762 words)

  
 Canadian federal election, 1997 - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
The Canadian federal election of 1997 was held on June 2, 1997, to elect members of the Canadian House of Commons.
The election closely reflected the pattern that had been set out in the 1993 election.
Commentators on election night even predicting a minority government, although the Liberals were secure in forming the next administration due to a divided opposition.
www.wikipedia.org /wiki/1997_Canadian_election   (498 words)

  
 Doug Young - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
He left provincial politics to run in the 1988 federal election for the Liberal Party of Canada, and was elected to the Canadian House of Commons as a Liberal Member of Parliament (MP).
With the election of a Liberal government in the 1993 election, the new Prime Minister, Jean Chrétien, appointed Young to the Canadian cabinet as Minister of Transport.
In one of the chief upsets of the 1997 election, Young was defeated in his riding by Yvon Godin of the New Democratic Party.
en.wikipedia.org /wiki/Doug_Young   (412 words)

  
 Encyclopedia: 1962 Canadian election   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-11-06)
When the Canadian federal election of 1962 was called, the Progressive Conservative Party of Canada of John George Diefenbaker had governed for almost five years with the largest majority in the House of Commons in Canadian history.
The Tories were reduced to a tenuous minority government as a result of economic difficulties such as high unemployment and a slumping Canadian dollar, as well as unpopular decisions such as the cancellation of the Avro Arrow.
The 1962 election was the first contested by the social democratic New Democratic Party, which had been formed from an alliance between the old Co-operative Commonwealth Federation and the Canadian Labour Congress.
www.nationmaster.com /encyclopedia/1962-Canadian-election   (558 words)

  
 Canadian Election Law & Policies
Elections Canada also provides a number of plain English overviews of the laws and policies governing the conduct of federal elections.
The specific limits on candidates' election expenses for the 2004 election vary from riding to riding because they are based on the number of electors in a constituency, but they will be set at the time it is called.
This law was challenged during the 2000 election, by Stephen Harper when he headed up the National Citizens Coalition, on the grounds that the law is an unconstitutional limit on the freedom of expression and of the voters' rights to be fully informed of all points of view.
www.sfu.ca /~aheard/elections/laws.html   (2045 words)

  
 Liberal Party of Canada   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-11-06)
In the 29 years after Canadian confederation, the Liberals were consigned to opposition, with the exception of one stint in government.
The 1988 Canadian election was notable for John Turner's strong opposition to the Canada-U.S. Free Trade Agreement negotiated by Tory Prime Minister Brian Mulroney.
In the June 28th, 2004 federal election, Paul Martin was re-elected as the Prime Minister of Canada, despite fierce competition from Conservative Party leader Stephen Harper.
www.sciencedaily.com /encyclopedia/liberal_party_of_canada   (1995 words)

  
 1993 Canadian election   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-11-06)
The 1993 Canadian federal election was one of the most eventful in Canadian history.
The election also saw these rise of two new parties: the Bloc Québécois, which became the official opposition, and the Reform Party, which also won many seats.
She had replaced Brian Mulroney, who was considered one of the most unpopular prime ministers in history after his failed constitutional reforms and the poor state of the Canadian economy.
www.ukpedia.com /1/1993-canadian-election.html   (413 words)

  
 Thomson Nelson - Political Science Resource Centre
The raw survey data from the 1997 and 2004 elections are available for the CES and for the 1984-2000 election studies from York University.
Canadian Elections offers a table comparing the votes and seats won by parties on a national and provincial basis.
Elections Canada provides the official results of the 1997 and 2000 general elections on line.
polisci.nelson.com /elections.html   (1253 words)

  
 [No title]
Support for the Canadian Alliance and its predecessor the Reform Party of Canada derived principally from this group, and that support carried forward into the new Conservative Party of Canada.
In the early days of the Canadian confederation, the party supported a mercantilist approach to economic development: export-led growth with high import barriers to protect local industry.
The rise of the Canadian Alliance was doubtlessly damaging to the Tories, though there remains some debate as to the precise degree.
en-cyclopedia.com /wiki/Progressive_Conservative_Party_of_Canada   (2160 words)

  
 The Ultimate John William Bosley - American History Information Guide and Reference
He returned to the Canadian House of Commons as a result of the 1984 Canadian election after which he became Speaker.
The first such election took place on September 30, 1986, when Speaker Bosley tendered his resignation and presided over the election of the Honourable John Fraser as the thirty-second Speaker of the House of Commons.
Bosley was re-elected as an MP in 1988 before being defeated in the disastrous 1993 Canadian election in which the Progressive Conservatives were reduced from 157 MPs to 2.
www.historymania.com /american_history/John_William_Bosley   (218 words)

  
 [No title]   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-11-06)
In only one election, 1992 (the year of the first Perot candidacy), did less than 80% of pre-election Republican identifiers (73%) report voting for their party in the post-election survey, and in three of them (1984, 1988 and 2000) more than 90% were loyal.
Although the 1993 election was almost as great a disaster for the NDP, with only 58% of their identifiers voting for the party, the loyalty level for New Democratic identifiers climbed to 74% in 1997 and to 81% in 2000.
Canadians in the fairly strong category comprised 36% of the sample in 1988, 37% in 1993, 39% in 1997, and 40% in 2000.
www.duke.edu /~tjs/arcs/finalversionmarch04.doc   (6396 words)

  
 Canadian federal election, 1993 -- Facts, Info, and Encyclopedia article   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-11-06)
The Canadian federal election of 1993 was held on October 25th, 1993 to elect members of the (Click link for more info and facts about Canadian House of Commons) Canadian House of Commons.
The election was called by Progressive Conservative leader (Click link for more info and facts about Kim Campbell) Kim Campbell, who had been (The person who holds the position of head of state in England) Prime Minister for only a few months.
She had replaced (Click link for more info and facts about Brian Mulroney) Brian Mulroney, who was considered one of the most unpopular Prime Ministers in Canadian history because of his failed constitutional reforms and the poor state of the Canadian economy.
www.absoluteastronomy.com /encyclopedia/C/Ca/Canadian_federal_election,_1993.htm   (1676 words)

  
 Canadian federal election, 1988 -- Facts, Info, and Encyclopedia article   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-11-06)
The Canadian federal election of 1988 was held November 21, 1988, to elect members of the (Click link for more info and facts about Canadian House of Commons) Canadian House of Commons.
The 1988 election was the most successful for the New Democratic Party.
The election was the last for Canada's (Click link for more info and facts about Social Credit) Social Credit movement: the party won no seats, and insignificant portion of the popular vote.
www.absoluteastronomy.com /encyclopedia/C/Ca/Canadian_federal_election,_1988.htm   (1078 words)

  
 International Journal of Canadian Studies - Issue # 17 Abstracts
Yet much of the literature describing Canadian constitutional discourses and dramas during this time period inscribes women as "Charter Canadians" whose present and future constitutional interests are (wrongly) assumed to be shaped entirely by a singular desire to protect and enhance their Charter rights and whose constitutional interventions are, therefore, self-interested, particularistic and even disruptive.
This paper argues that the conventional assumptions about women’s constitutional participation (especially their representational claims) are based on patriarchal conceptions of citizenship which construct women as inherently partial, private and dependent and, therefore, as unable to measure up to the supposedly universal, but actually masculinist, norms of political engagement.
In contrast, this paper argues that the Group’s rhetoric and activities should be seen in the light of the broad international reaction to the modern world that swept Europe and North America in the decades around the turn of the century.
www.iccs-ciec.ca /pages/7_journal/b_issues/abstracts17.html   (1447 words)

  
 Canada Party biography .ms   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-11-06)
The Canada Party was a short-lived political party that ran 56 candidates in the 1993 Canadian election, and one candidate in a 1996 by-election, but was unable to win any seats.
In the run-up to the 1997 election, the party's board voted to support Paul Hellyer's Canadian Action Party because of that party's support for monetary reform.
Foss was also a CAP candidate in the 2004 Canadian election.
canada-party.biography.ms   (233 words)

  
 1993 Canadian election   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-11-06)
The election also saw the riseof two new parties: the Bloc Québécois, which became the Official Opposition, and the Reform Party, which also won many seats.
In the election the Tories were reduced to two seats, their worstshowing ever.
1993 was one of only two elections in Canadian history (the other was 1997) where the official Opposition did not have themajority of the opposition's seats.
www.therfcc.org /1993-canadian-election-169322.html   (443 words)

  
 wikien.info: Main_Page   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-11-06)
David MacDonald was first elected to the Canadian House of Commons as a Progressive Conservative MP from his native Prince Edward Island in the 1965 Canadian election.
With the Tory victory in the 1979 Candian election he became Minister of Communications, Minister responsible for the Status of Women and Secretary of State for Canada in the short-lived Cabinet of Joe Clark.
MacDonald lost his seat in the 1980 Canadian election but returned, this time as MP for the Toronto riding of Rosedale in the 1988 Canadian election.
www.hostingciamca.com /index.php?title=David_MacDonald   (208 words)

  
 Canadian election surveys and data
Canadian census and election data, 1908-1968, 1968-1974, 1979-1984.
A research collection of district level election results for approximately 350 national legislative elections in 26 countries.
The objective of the Archive is to systematically collect election statistics in as much detail as possible, including, as a minimum, the results at the level of the individual election districts in which votes are converted into seats.
www.chass.utoronto.ca /datalib/major/election.htm   (657 words)

  
 Canadian Election 2000 (Research Note 17 2000-01)
Essentially the election had the one major issue: whether or not voters could take a chance with the Alliance.
As the campaign developed, the Liberal opinion poll lead was reduced, possibly because of the manner in which the election also became a plebiscite on the standing of the Prime Minister.
Canadian politics is heavily regionalised, and the 2000 election confirmed the extent of this.
www.aph.gov.au /library/pubs/rn/2000-01/01RN17.htm   (1193 words)

  
 CNN.com - Chretien calls snap Canadian election - October 22, 2000
In the past, Canadian voters have punished those leaders who have tried to capitalize on their position by calling early elections.
Its strongest challenger is expected to be the newly formed Canadian Alliance, led by Stockwell Day, which is trying to bring together various conservative political parties into a group capable of toppling the Liberals.
The Liberal Party came to power in 1993, after which the country's economy recovered on the heels of the growth in the United States economy.
archives.cnn.com /2000/WORLD/americas/10/22/canada.election   (804 words)

  
 The American Spectator
I'll give you one obvious answer: It's the easiest Canadian election for Americans to understand, from their vantage point, in the last 20 years.
He quit the Commons in 1998, but when Reform's successor (the Canadian Alliance) needed a new chieftain in 2001, Harper was convinced to return to a party always short on eloquent bilinguals.
The active complement of the Canadian Forces is hovering near 50,000, Canadian sovereignty over its northern borders is violated with impunity, and the soldiers we do have are fighting with embarrassingly outdated equipment.
www.spectator.org /dsp_article.asp?art_id=6729   (1285 words)

  
 2004 Canadian Election
However, once the 2004 election was called, the party's prospects for a fourth consecutive mandate were anything but assured.
As part of their successful 2003 election campaign, the Ontario Liberals had taken a page from George H. Bush's playbook, promising "no new taxes!" Then, just days before the federal election was called, they reneged-introducing massive new levies to cover revenue shortfalls in health care.
Surveys conducted during and after the election campaign indicate that the BQ's impressive vote total has been accompanied by a rebirth of public support for Quebec sovereignty, with nearly half of Quebeckers saying they would vote "yes" if another sovereignty referendum were held.
www.apsanet.org /section_252.cfm   (1426 words)

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