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Topic: 2003 invasion of Iraq casualties


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  2003 invasion of Iraq
Casualties in the U.S.-led invasion and occupation of Iraq
Casualties of the invading forces were not limited to the Iraqi military as civilian men, women and children residents within the combat zones were also casualties but numbers are unknown, probably in the thousands.
Their view was that Iraq had violated the terms of the ceasefire by breaching two key conditions and thus made the invasion of Iraq a legal continuation of the earlier war.
publicliterature.org /en/wikipedia/2/20/2003_invasion_of_iraq_1.html   (5574 words)

  
 2003 invasion of Iraq
The 2003 invasion of Iraq began on March 20, 2003, when a large force of United States and British troops invaded Iraq, leading to the collapse of the Iraqi government in about three weeks and the start of the 2003 occupation of Iraq.
The 2003 occupation of Iraq thereupon commenced, marked by ongoing violent conflict between the Iraqi and the occupying forces.
In 2002 the Iraq disarmament crisis arose primarily as a diplomatic situation, with United Nations actions regarding Iraq culminating in the passage of UN Security Council Resolution 1441 and the resumption of weapons inspections.
www.fastload.org /20/2003_invasion_of_Iraq.html   (1657 words)

  
 Welcome to IraqiWar.com
The Iraq War, sometimes called the Second or Third Gulf War or in the U.S., Operation Iraqi Freedom, is an ongoing conflict which began with the United States-led 20 March 2003 invasion of Iraq.
The main rationale for the Iraq War offered by U.S. President George W. Bush, British Prime Minister Tony Blair, and their domestic and foreign supporters was that Iraq was developing weapons of mass destruction.
In the 2003 State of the Union Address, Bush claimed that the U.S. could not wait until the threat from Iraqi leader Saddam Hussein became imminent.
www.iraqiwar.com   (257 words)

  
 2003 invasion of Iraq   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-10-27)
Casualties in the U.S.-led invasion and occupation of Iraq
Casualties of the invading forces were not limited to the Iraqi military as civilian men, women and children residents within the combat zones were also casualties but numbers are unknown, probably in the thousands.
Their view was that Iraq had violated the terms of the ceasefire by breaching two key conditions and thus made the invasion of Iraq a legal continuation of the earlier war.
www.1-free-software.com /en/wikipedia/2/20/2003_invasion_of_iraq_1.html   (5574 words)

  
 2003 Invasion of Iraq - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
Prior to the U.S. invasion of Iraq, Zarqawi had settled in Kurdish northern Iraq (an area not controlled by Saddam Hussein's government) where he joined the terrorist organization Ansar al-Islam, which was an enemy of the Ba'athist government.
Those who opposed the war in Iraq did not regard Iraq's violation of UN resolutions to be a valid case for the war, since no single nation has the authority, under the UN Charter, to judge Iraq's compliance to UN resolutions and to enforce them.
On 22 July 2003 during a raid by the U.S. 101st Airborne Division and men from Task Force 20, Saddam Hussein's sons Uday and Qusay, and one of his grandsons were killed.
en.wikipedia.org /wiki/2003_invasion_of_Iraq   (10412 words)

  
 2003 Invasion of Iraq - Open Encyclopedia   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-10-27)
Note that the 2003 invasion was commonly called at the time the "Iraq War." This term is also commonly used to refer to Occupation of Iraq, 2003-2004 continuing hostilities in that country under military and civil occupation, though the U.S. government uses the term "insurgency" to refer to "non-official" opposition forces.
Prior to the U.S. invasion of Iraq, Zarqawi had settled in Kurdish northern Iraq (an area not controlled by Saddam Hussein's government) where he joined, and may have led, the terrorist organization Ansar al-Islam, which was an enemy of the Baathist regime.
Prior to invasion, the United States and other coalition forces involved in the 1991 Persian Gulf War had been engaged in a low-level conflict with Iraq, enforcing the Iraqi no-fly zones where Iraqi air-defense installations were engaged on a fairly regular basis.
open-encyclopedia.com /2003_Invasion_of_Iraq   (8109 words)

  
 Casualties of the conflict in Iraq since 2003 - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
Casualties of the conflict in Iraq since 2003 (beginning with the 2003 invasion of Iraq and continuing with the ensuing 2003 occupation of Iraq and continuing coalition presence) have come in many forms, and the accuracy of the information available on different types of casualties varies greatly.
In late May 2003, one reporter for The Guardian estimated that between 13,500 and 45,000 Iraqi soldiers were killed by American and British troops during six weeks of war [19].
Since at least 180,000 Army soldiers and 58,000 Marines served in Iraq in 2003, this means that a minimum of about 124,000 U.S. troops who returned from Iraq by the end of 2003 each believed they had caused the death of one or more enemy combatants.
en.wikipedia.org /wiki/2003_invasion_of_Iraq_casualties   (3148 words)

  
 2003 Iraq war timeline - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
This is the ongoing timeline of the 2003 Iraq war, principally the military actions and consequences of the US-led invasion.
In Southern Iraq, Iraqi forces are reported to have fired on Allied lines with Russian made 122mm howitzers; weapons used by the US against Iraqi forces are reported to include 155mm howitzers, Hellfire missiles, Cobra helicopter gunships, and bombardment by explosives and napalm.
Iraq reports that it captured a number of American prisoners of war.
en.wikipedia.org /wiki/Timeline_of_2003_invasion_of_Iraq   (4074 words)

  
 Mortality Studies | Iraq Mortality
The report, published by Iraq Body Count in association with Oxford Research Group, is based on comprehensive analysis of over 10,000 media reports published between March 2003 and March 2005.
The COSIT/UNDP - Iraq Living Conditions Survey 2004 reports and analyses the living conditions in Iraq as they were approximately one year after the change of regime in the country, as a result of the 2003 war.
In October of 2004 The Lancet published a study titled "Mortality before and after the 2003 invasion of Iraq: cluster sample survey" which provided an estimate that 98,000 Iraqis have died because of the invasion and occupation of Iraq.
iraqmortality.org /mortality-studies   (630 words)

  
 Iraq - Global Policy Forum
The United States invaded Iraq in alliance with Britain on March 20, 2003, winning a quick military victory and ousting the government of Saddam Hussein.
It also examines the issues that have emerged since the invasion, such as the resistance to the occupation, the disputes surrounding a post-war government, and the task of reconstruction.
With close to 4 million displaced people in and outside of Iraq, an average of about 100 people killed daily, and a third of the population living in poverty, Iraq 's humanitarian emergency has reached a crisis level that compares with some of the world's most urgent catastrophes.
www.globalpolicy.org /security/issues/irqindx.htm   (1085 words)

  
 Updated Iraq Survey Affirms Earlier Mortality Estimates
The results are consistent with the findings of an October 2004 study of Iraq mortality conducted by the Hopkins researchers.
To put these numbers in context, deaths are occurring in Iraq now at a rate more than three times that from before the invasion of March 2003,” said Gilbert Burnham, MD, PhD, lead author of the study and co-director of the Bloomberg School’s Center for Refugee and Disaster Response.
According to the researchers, the overall rate of mortality in Iraq since March 2003 is 13.3 deaths per 1,000 persons per year compared to 5.5 deaths per 1,000 persons per year prior to March 2003.
www.jhsph.edu /publichealthnews/press_releases/2006/burnham_iraq_2006.html   (972 words)

  
 2003 invasion of Iraq information - Search.com
Prior to the invasion, the United States' official position was that Iraq illegally possessed "weapons of mass destruction" in violation of UN Security Council Resolution 1441 and had to be disarmed by force.
Proponents of the war claim that the invasion had implicit approval of the Security Council and was therefore not in violation of the UN Charter since all that happened from an international law point of view was a withdrawal from a pre-existing cease-fire after ample cease-fire violations over a period of years.
This gave indication that the 2003 invasion of Iraq is seen as a separate conflict from the war on terrorism as a whole.
www.search.com /reference/2003_invasion_of_Iraq   (8484 words)

  
 Iraq War -   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-10-27)
The Iraq war or war in Iraq is both an informal and formal term for military conflicts in Iraq that began with the invasion of 2003.
The War of Iraq (2003) was the war in the Middle East country of Iraq, which resulted from the the Iraq disarmament crisis of late 2002 and began with the invasion of 2003.
On March 20, 2003 at approximately 02:30 UTC (05:30 local time), about 90 minutes after the lapse of the 48-hour deadline set by the occupation for Saddam Hussein and his sons to leave Iraq, explosions were heard in Baghdad and Australian Special Air Service Regiment personnel crossed the border into southern Iraq.
www.aljazeera.com /me.asp?service_ID=9964   (3462 words)

  
 Iraqi Casualties of the conflict in Iraq since 2003 -   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-10-27)
Casualties of the conflict in Iraq since 2003 (beginning with the 2003 invasion of Iraq and continuing with the ensuing 2003 occupation of Iraq and continuing occupation presence) have come in many forms, and the accuracy of the information available on different types of casualties varies greatly.
We assessed the relative risk of death associated with the 2003 invasion and occupation by comparing mortality in the 17.8 months after the invasion with the 14.6-month period preceding it.
The major causes of death before the invasion were myocardial infarction, cerebrovascular accidents, and other chronic disorders whereas after the invasion violence was the primary cause of death.
www.aljazeera.com /me.asp?service_ID=10210   (1902 words)

  
 CBC News In Depth: Iraq
But the numbers published on iraqbodycount.net don't distinguish between Iraqis killed by coalition forces or by insurgents, arguing that they are all a result of the March 2003 invasion and the U.S.-led coalition is responsible for preventing them.
There are problems inherent in Iraq Body Count's methodology, not the least of which is the reliance on information gathered by the media.
That study surveyed Iraqi households and compared death rates before the invasion to those after, and concluded about 100,000 civilians are likely dead because of the coalition military action.
www.cbc.ca /news/background/iraq/casualties.html   (1818 words)

  
 United for Peace of Pierce County, WA - We nonviolently oppose the reliance on unilateral military actions rather than ...   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-10-27)
An excess mortality of nearly 100,000 deaths was reported in Iraq for the period March, 2003-September, 2004, attributed to the invasion of Iraq.
We estimate that, as a consequence of the coalition invasion of March 18, 2003, about 655,000 Iraqis have died above the number that would be expected in a non-conflict situation, which is equivalent to about 2·5% of the population in the study area.
From January 2002 until the invasion in 2003, virtually all deaths in Iraq were from non-violent causes.
www.ufppc.org /content/view/5203   (4811 words)

  
 Iraq Body Count | Comment & Analysis   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-10-27)
A consequence of this positive development is that, increasingly, reporting about civilian casualties draws on a number of studies, and such reporting is often framed in the context of debates about what is the best, or most accurate, way to estimate the civilian cost of the war.
Civilian and military casualties are not separated out, but this is one of the few serious attempts to publish a comprehensive list of wounded as well as dead.
On the last weekend of March the foreign minister Micheline Calmey-Rey was quoted as saying her ministry would publish a list of civilians killed in the Iraqi conflict and implied that Switzerland, as the depository state of the Geneva conventions, had a duty to draw attention to the innocent victims of the war.
www.iraqbodycount.net /editorial.htm   (7861 words)

  
 Iraq Body Count
Iraq Body Count is an ongoing human security project which maintains and updates the world’s largest public database of violent civilian deaths during and since the 2003 invasion.
Data is drawn from cross-checked media reports, hospital, morgue, NGO and official figures to produce a credible record of known deaths and incidents.
Iraq death toll in third year of occupation is highest yet
www.iraqbodycount.org   (368 words)

  
 Superbug Brought Back by Iraq War Casualties
The links between casualties brought back from Iraq and outbreaks in the NHS have caused alarm within the health service and led to renewed demands for more dedicated wards for Britain's armed forces to enable wounded soldiers to be isolated more effectively.
Experts in microbiology who were studying the links between the infection and those wounded in Iraq, said an injured soldier thought to have caught the infection in Iraq may have caused a large outbreak of the superbug in an intensive care unit in an NHS hospital in south-east England.
Reg Keys, whose son Tom was killed by a mob in Majar al-Kabir, Iraq, in June 2003, said the existence of the new strain of the infection underlined the need for dedicated facilities for the armed forces.
www.commondreams.org /headlines06/1108-04.htm   (724 words)

  
 ipedia.com: 2003 invasion of Iraq Article   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-10-27)
2003 Invasion of Iraq Date 02:30 UTC March 20, 2003 – April 15, 2003 Place Iraq, Middle East Asia Prelude Iraq disarmament crisis Mission neutralizing...
Casualties of the invasion were not limited to the Iraqi military; civilian casualties were probably in the thousands.
Human Rights Watch has issued a report arguing that the justification of "human rights" for the war in Iraq does not meet appropriate standards for the level of suffering that it causes.
www.ipedia.com /2003_invasion_of_iraq_1.html   (5545 words)

  
 IraqJournal.org - Index
In addition, the website IraqBodyCount.net is attempting to keep a running count of all civilian casualties since January of this year.
As the Bush administration threatens a massive attack on Iraq, many within the corporate media have chosen to become cheerleaders for the war cause.
New Booklet Iraq: On the Edge with photos and text by Thorne Anderson, available on-line through Trifecta Press.
www.iraqjournal.org   (801 words)

  
 CNN.com - No casualties? White House disputes Robertson comment - Oct 20, 2004
Robertson, an ardent Bush supporter, told CNN in an interview Tuesday night that he urged the president to prepare the American people for the prospect of casualties before launching the war in March 2003.
More than 1,100 American troops have been killed in Iraq since the invasion, most of them battling an insurgency that followed the overthrow of Iraqi leader Saddam Hussein.
He said that's when the president told him he did not expect casualties from the invasion.
www.cnn.com /2004/ALLPOLITICS/10/19/robertson.bush.iraq/index.html   (706 words)

  
 Forces: U.S. & Coalition/Casualties - Special Reports
View casualties in the war in Afghanistan and examine U.S. war casualties dating back to the Revolutionary War.
Allen died on June 8, 2005, in Tikrit, Iraq, of injuries sustained in an alleged fratricide attack in Tikrit, Iraq, on June 7, 2005.
Androschuk was injured during a battle for a Tigris River bridge in Kut, Iraq, and died during evacuation to the Ukrainian military base in Kut on April 6, 2004
www.cnn.com /SPECIALS/2003/iraq/forces/casualties/index.html   (6226 words)

  
 BBC NEWS | Middle East | Iraq death toll 'soared post-war'
The Iraq Body Count, a respected database run by a group of academics and peace activists, has put the number of reported civilian deaths at between 14,000-16,000.
Before the invasion, most people died as a result of heart attack, stroke and chronic illness, the report says, whereas after the invasion, "violence was the primary cause of death".
Human rights groups say the occupying powers have failed in their duty to catalogue the deaths, giving the impression that ordinary Iraqis' lives are worth less than those of their soldiers for whom detailed statistics are available.
news.bbc.co.uk /2/hi/middle_east/3962969.stm   (681 words)

  
 Army families prepare for Iraq casualties   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-10-27)
Last week, she and about two dozen other spouses attended a class to learn about the Army's casualty notification process, arranging funerals and how baby-sitting, meal preparation and answering phone calls can help a grieving family.
Unfortunately, with casualties mounting in Iraq [4], dead and wounded soldiers are a reality Army families must prepare for.
Once uniformed soldiers notify family members about a casualty, the volunteers are there to provide whatever assistance they may need.
www.savannahnow.com /node/176857/print   (387 words)

  
 ZNet | Iraq | Letter to Bush on Undercounting Iraqi Casualties
They interviewed badly injured soldiers who were upset by their being excluded from the official count, even though they were, in one soldier's words, "in hostile territory...".
The Pentagon declined to be interviewed, instead sending a letter that contained information not included in published casualty reports.
This is no small matter that can be downplayed by superficial reassurances designed to temporarily assuage the uneasiness of the American public.  The effects of this war will remain for many years to come and each and every one of us will have to cope with it.
www.zmag.org /content/print_article.cfm?itemID=9307§ionID=15   (184 words)

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