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Topic: 2004 Iranian parliamentary elections


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In the News (Tue 23 Apr 19)

  
  Strategic Insights -- Iranian Politics After the 2004 Parliamentary Election
The parliamentary election held on February 20, 2004 in Iran was a key turning point in that country's political evolution.
The election outcome and the lack of visible unrest during the period surrounding the election suggest that the Iranian people are not ready for an open confrontation, and may even want to give the Conservatives a chance to implement the China model.
It is especially bewildering that Iranians have not reacted strongly to the Conservatives' various attacks on the Reformists in recent years, to their blatant efforts to control the election in February, and to Iran's continuing economic stagnation.
www.ccc.nps.navy.mil /si/2004/jun/gasiorowskiJun04.asp   (2775 words)

  
  Election
The universal acceptance of elections as a tool for selecting representatives in modern democracies is in sharp contrast with the practice in the democratic archetype, ancient Athens, where elections were considered an oligarchic institution and where most political offices were filled using sortition.
In the 2004 Iranian parliamentary elections almost all of the reformist candidates were ruled unfit by the Guardian Council of religious leaders.
In order for democratic elections to be fair and competitive, opposition parties and candidates must enjoy the rights to freedom of speech, assembly, and movement as necessary to voice their criticisms of the government openly and to bring alternative policies and candidates to the voters.
www.brainyencyclopedia.com /encyclopedia/e/el/election.html   (2777 words)

  
  Election - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
The universal acceptance of elections as a tool for selecting representatives in modern democracies is in sharp contrast with the practice in the democratic archetype, ancient Athens, where elections were considered an oligarchic institution and where most political offices were filled using sortition.
In the 2004 Iranian parliamentary elections almost all of the reformist candidates were ruled unfit by the Guardian Council of religious leaders.
In order for democratic elections to be fair and competitive, opposition parties and candidates must enjoy the rights to freedom of speech, assembly, and movement as necessary to voice their criticisms of the government openly and to bring alternative policies and candidates to the voters.
en.wikipedia.org /wiki/Elections   (2626 words)

  
 Iranian Majlis election, 2004 - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
Elections to the Majlis of Iran were held on February 20, 2004.
The runoff elections for Tehran has been postponed to be held with the Iranian presidential election of June 17, 2005.
The elections took place amidst a serious political crisis that developed due to the January 2004 decision of the conservative vetting body, the Council of Guardians, to ban thousands of candidates from running -- nearly half of the total.
en.wikipedia.org /wiki/Iran_Majlis_election,_2004   (462 words)

  
 Elections
When elections are called, politicians and their supporters attempt to influence policy by competing directly for the votes of constituents in what are called campaigns.
In the 2004 Iranian parliamentary elections almost all of the reformist candidates were ruled unfit by the Guardian Council of religious leaders.
In order for democratic elections to be fair and competitive, opposition parties and candidates must enjoy the rights to freedom of speech, assembly, and movement as necessary to voice their criticisms of the government openly and to bring alternative policies and candidates to the voters.
abcworld.net /elections.html   (2478 words)

  
 Cox & Forkum: February 2004 Archives
You will have to excuse us Iranians for our lack of sympathy for these so-called reformers: Just ask yourself, as we ask ourselves, where they were while Iranian youths were being beaten, tortured, abducted, maimed, and deprived of their legitimate rights to continue their university studies.
Although the regime had done its best to urge everyone to participate in the elections, brave Iranians were far more determined to tell the world and the regime, again, that they are tired, and are on the verge of achieving their much longed-for change.
Yesterday's general election in Iran was as cynical and undemocratic as anything an Orwellian state could devise, with a self appointed clerical elite forcing a cowed press and subservient religious establishment to hail the "democratic" outcome of an election shorn of all but the trappings of democracy.
www.coxandforkum.com /archives/2004_02.html   (7102 words)

  
 Iran polls at dead-end: Khatami -DAWN - Top Stories; 01 February, 2004
TEHRAN, Jan 31: Iranian President Mohammad Khatami said on Saturday talks to resolve a crisis over the country's parliamentary elections were at a "dead-end" after the Guardian Council confirmed bans on hundreds of reformists from standing in the vote.
The news agency said the president would chair an emergency cabinet meeting to discuss the crisis, but it was not clear what the next move would be for the reformist president, who had previously voiced hope talks with hardliners would see most candidate bans overturned.
They say the council is trying to tilt the vote in favour of conservative candidates, who lost control of parliament to reformists in 2000 elections.
www.dawn.com /2004/02/01/top15.htm   (373 words)

  
 Foreign Policy In Focus | Implications of the Seventh Majlis Elections in Iran   (Site not responding. Last check: )
Iranians are among the most pro-American people in the region, and they do not need to be sold on the virtues of freedom and liberty.
In the course of this latest parliamentary election, Iran has moved from being a semi-democracy--the envy of several of its neighbors--to being even closer identified as a regime ruled by an increasingly diminishing minority out of step with the people.
Iranian domestic politics are now set for a showdown for supremacy within the conservative camp; as with any political grouping, Iran's conservatives do not represent one unified block.
fpif.org /fpiftxt/1158   (1552 words)

  
 Middle East Institute: Policy Brief
The Council of Guardians’; disqualification of more than 2,000 candidates from the February 20, 2004, elections – and the subsequent resignation of nearly one-third of the Iranian parliament – signaled the death of the Islamic Republic as it exists in Iran.
The 1997 election of Mohammed Reza Khatami as president was a turning point in Iran’s recent history, Takeyh believes, because it enfranchised the public and cemented its faith in the right to a political voice.
First, the Iranian population is largely young, urban, and educated: 70 percent are less than 30 years old, 70 percent live in cities, and 80 percent are literate.
www.mideasti.org /articles/doc176.html   (908 words)

  
 Access Denied: Iran's Exclusionary Elections: III.  Human Rights Violations
The Guardian Council’s discriminatory and arbitrary disqualification of candidates was on stark display during the parliamentary elections of 2004.
Ahmad Nateq Nuri, deputy leader of the Conservative faction in the sixth parliament, justified the majority of disqualifications during the seventh parliamentary elections in 2004 as necessary to prevent the formation of a secular government.
Iranian election laws require that the candidates for the parliament declare their loyalty to the religious doctrine of the absolute rule of the Jurisconsult [velayat faqih motlaqeh], a Shi`a doctrine that underpins Iran’s system of government.
www.hrw.org /backgrounder/mena/iran0605/3.htm   (1437 words)

  
 Boston.com / News / World / Middle East / 124 Iranian lawmakers quit over elections   (Site not responding. Last check: )
Karroubi, the parliamentary speaker, launched a rare verbal attack on the Guardian Council, the unelected body of hard-line clerics that disqualified more than 2,400 reformist candidates from the legislative elections.
Hard-liners lost control of the parliament in elections four years ago, and repeatedly have thwarted Khatami's efforts toward greater democracy and a relaxation of the Islamic social code.
Elections on February 20th are illegitimate," said Reza Khatami, the president's younger brother and a deputy speaker.
www.boston.com /news/world/middleeast/articles/2004/02/02/124_iranian_lawmakers_quit_over_elections   (704 words)

  
 "Iran after the Elections" (February-March 2004)
The broadest implication of the parliamentary elections is that they have dramatically underscored the failure of Iran's mullahs to graft Islamist ideology with the institutions of a modern democratic state.
For all the elections the Islamic Republic has held over the past 25 years and all the gesture politics and sloganeering revolving around the theme of "Islamic Democracy," alternations of power in the Iranian government are still determined in secret by a handful of clerics.
[1] While Municipal elections are not subject to the oversight of the Council of Guardians, nevertheless the candidates are vetted by special committees of the Interior Ministry who liaise extensively with the Ministry of Intelligence and the judiciary.
www.meib.org /articles/0402_iran1.htm   (2138 words)

  
 Access Denied: Iran's Exclusionary Elections: I. Summary and Recommendations
None of the eighty-nine women who registered their candidacy for the upcoming presidential elections were allowed to stand in the election.
Parliamentary and presidential candidates are expected to declare their loyalty to the doctrine of absolute rule of the Jurisconsult [velayat faqih motlaqeh].
The exclusionary and discriminatory nature of Iran’s elections was evident during the parliamentary elections in February 2004.
www.hrw.org /backgrounder/mena/iran0605/1.htm   (1141 words)

  
 Iran - Crisis - Majlis - Worldpress.org
Iranian reformist legislator Elaheh Koulaiee listens to the wife of fellow deputy Mohsen Mirdamadi, as the sister of the political prisoner Hashem Aghagary (L), listens, Jan. 13, 2004.
Iranian reformist deputies have refused to leave the Majlis assembly for three days to protest the ban on most reformist candidates’ seeking reelection (Photo: Henghameh Fahimi/AFP-Getty Images).
When the Guardian Council took the questionable and unprecedented action of disqualifying a large number of the present Majlis [Parliamentary] deputies and other political activists from running in the next election, it in effect staged a bloodless coup.
www.worldpress.org /print_article.cfm?article_id=1883&dont=yes   (701 words)

  
 2004 Iran Special Weapons - Missile, Nuclear, Chemical and Biological Weapons News
IRAN / POLITICS VOA 12 Jan 2004 -- Iran's provincial governors are threatening to resign unless a decision by the conservative Guardian Council is reversed.
IRAN/SOLANA VOA 12 Jan 2004 -- Amid an intensifying political crisis in Iran, a senior E-U official has told Iranian leaders that the way their scheduled February parliamentary election is conducted will have an impact on their country's relations with the European Union.
IRAN/QUAKE VOA 01 Jan 2004 -- Iranian officials are responding favorably to the U-S decision to ease sanctions against the Islamic republic to help the flow of humanitarian aid into the country.
www.globalsecurity.org /wmd/library/news/iran/2004/index_01.htm   (2977 words)

  
 The Epoch Times :: Conservatives Appear to Lead Iranian Parliamentary Election
Iran's supreme leader Ayatollah Ali Khamenei called for Iranians to turn out in force to vote in the parliamentary election and defeat what he called the enemies of the Islamic revolution.
The controversial election was boycotted by most reformist candidates, as a protest against the ruling Guardian Council's decision to bar more than 2,300 reformists from running, a move critics say was an attempt to hang onto power.
But analysts say their push to liberalize Iranian society, led by President Mohammed Khatami, has lost some of its momentum and direction, in part due to staunch resistance from conservatives.
www.theepochtimes.com /news/4-2-22/20035.html   (382 words)

  
 AEI - Short Publications   (Site not responding. Last check: )
The Iranian government initially said that it had no outside assistance with its centrifuge program, but after tests by the International Atomic Energy Association, or IAEA, found traces of weapons-grade uranium on Iranian centrifuges, Iranian officials changed their story and said that the contamination came from imported equipment not previously declared.
Last month President Bush reiterated that "the Iranian people deserve a genuinely democratic system in which elections are honest and in which their leaders answer to them instead of the other way around." His administration, however, shows little inclination to work toward such goals.
While the Iranian government bragged about a 50% turnout in 2004 parliamentary elections, pilgrims suggested that in most provinces, the figure was less than 15%.
www.aei.org /publications/pubID.22810,filter.all/pub_detail.asp   (1640 words)

  
 Iran’s Reformist Party to Boycott Elections
In an emotional statement read aloud during the parliamentary session and broadcast live across the nation on Iranian radio, the members who resigned accused powerful conservatives of seeking to impose a religious dictatorship like that of the Taliban, who were overthrown by American-led forces in Afghanistan.
The resignations were a move typical of the brinkmanship that marks Iranian politics, to try to get the hard-liners to back down three weeks before a crucial election that will determine the future of the reform movement in Iran.
The student news agency ISNA reported that a pro-democracy Iranian student group said on Sunday that it had sought permission to hold public demonstrations on Wednesday to protest the ban, a move that could provoke a clash with riot police officers and vigilante groups.
www.nytimes.com /2004/02/02/international/middleeast/02CND-IRAN.html?ex=1391144400&en=182d8a0169b94e05&ei=5007&partner=USERLAND   (719 words)

  
 Top News: Faculty Opinions, Nichols
The death of this first pro-democracy movement in 1907 and the return of decades of dictatorship was followed by the "revival of constitutionalism," a resurgence of a docile parliament, and the capture of the Iranian government by the nationalist pro-democracy movement led by the popularly elected Prime Minister Mohammad Musaddiq.
Iranians remember bitterly that their two experiments with democracy were defeated not only by domestic forces of reaction, but also by foreign intervention.
The Europeans, apparently understand better than their American counterparts that in the Iranian political culture the quest for democracy is inextricably intertwined with preserving a fierce sense of independence.
www.virginia.edu /topnews/facultyopinions/2004/ramazaniIran.html   (829 words)

  
 EurasiaNet Eurasia Insight - Conservatives and Reformists in Iran Prepare for Parliamentary Elections
Conservative and reformist forces in Iran are girding for parliamentary elections in February 2004.
Iranian hardliners are determined to win back control over the legislature, and thus tighten their grip over the country’s development agenda.
Meanwhile, reformists have yet to forge a united approach to the 2004 parliamentary vote.
www.eurasianet.org /departments/insight/articles/eav102203a.shtml   (829 words)

  
 Iranian elections canceled
Moussavi Lari said it is the right of the government not to hold an election that it believes cannot serve people's interests.
It was not clear whether there might yet be some sort of compromise, averting a showdown between the Iranian government and the council.
The Associated Press reported that the Iranian president was later admitted to the hospital with severe back pain, forcing the postponement of an emergency Cabinet meeting scheduled for Saturday afternoon to discuss the crisis.
www.sfgate.com /cgi-bin/article.cgi?file=/chronicle/archive/2004/02/01/MNGTG4MKQC1.DTL&type=printable   (280 words)

  
 Online NewsHour: Reformists Boycott Elections in Iran -- February 20, 2004
LOUISE BATES: The parliamentary election in Iran is more a test of public sentiment than a real political contest, since nearly two and a half thousand candidates have been banned from running.
I will add that one of the lessons that we can draw from this election is that the Iranian people, the vast majority of the Iranian people have become disillusioned with the reformist movement and the reformists in general.
The implication of that is that the Iranian people have really separated themselves from the political structure and now they are increasingly seeking solutions in the civil society and they have turned away from the political solutions and political structures.
www.pbs.org /newshour/bb/middle_east/jan-june04/iran_02-20.html   (1983 words)

  
 Iran: Deputies Continue Sit-In As Khatami Says Political Crisis Heading Toward Settlement - RADIO FREE EUROPE / RADIO ...
Prague, 22 January 2004 (RFE/RL) -- Legislators in Tehran are in the 12th day of a sit-in in parliament, protesting a decision by the conservative Guardians Council to exclude more than 3,000 reformist candidates from standing in 20 February parliamentary polls.
Khatami yesterday downplayed the crisis, calling it a "normal part of the election process." Speaking at the World Economic Summit in Davos, Switzerland, he expressed hope that parliamentary elections in Iran will be free and competitive.
A final list of candidates for the parliamentary elections is due to be released on 12 February.
www.rferl.org /features/features_article.aspx?id=817c6be7-1667-47b1-bbca-0fc40cf5f69c&y=2004&m=01   (690 words)

  
 AFGHANISTAN: Focus on preparations for parliamentary elections
However, in a country new to democracy and elections, where insecurity, illiteracy and strong conservative traditions continue to hold sway, holding a genuinely representative national parliamentary poll remains a huge challenge.
The poll for parliament was originally scheduled for directly after the presidential election in October 2004, but was postponed due to poor security, lack of administrative capacity and slow progress on a census of the country's population.
Erben said that he was aware that the local dimension to the forthcoming election meant there was potential for conflict - with local warlords likely to put undue pressure on voters to cast their ballots in the their favour.
www.payvand.com /news/05/apr/1202.html   (874 words)

  
 Iranian Council Bars Thousands From Vote
The Iranian Student News Agency reported that governors general around the country had said in a letter to President Khatami that they would resign if the disqualification of candidates was not reversed.
But Iranian newspapers reported Sunday that a majority of disqualifications were made because the candidates opposed Iran's religious government or were members of illegal opposition groups.
The election had been seen as a test of the public's attitude toward the reform movement in Iran.
personal.ecu.edu /conradtd/pols2010/2010Spring04/2010Sp04-023.htm   (639 words)

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