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Topic: A Letter Concerning Toleration


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The toleration of those that differ from others in matters of religion is so agreeable to the Gospel of Jesus Christ, and to the genuine reason of mankind, that it seems monstrous for men to be so blind as not to perceive the necessity and advantage of it in so clear a light.
Concerning outward worship, I say, in the first place, that the magistrate has no power to enforce by law, either in his own Church, or much less in another, the use of any rites or ceremonies whatsoever in the worship of God.
Concerning which it is manifest that those who have one and the same rule of faith and worship are of the same religion; and those who have not the same rule of faith and worship are of different religions.
eserver.org /18th/toleration.txt   (13954 words)

  
 Locke, A Second Letter Concerning Toleration ToC: The Online Library of Liberty   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-09-10)
The first thing you seem startled at in the author’s letter, is the largeness of the toleration he proposes; and you think it strange that he would not have so much as a “pagan, mahometan, or jew, excluded from the civil rights of the commonwealth, because of his religion,” p.
Toleration is but the removing that force; so that why those should not be tolerated as well as others, if you wish their conversion, I do not see.
The purpose of the letter is plainly to defend toleration, exempt from all force; especially civil force, or the force of the magistrate.
oll.libertyfund.org /Home3/HTML.php?recordID=0389   (13289 words)

  
 Amazon.com: A Letter Concerning Toleration: Books: John Locke,Hilaire Belloc   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-09-10)
Locke sees tolerance as fundamentally a "live and let live" situation, a state which must be acheived to avoid the endless relativity of a regime fueled by religion; as each man is orthodox to himself and heretical to others, he argues, religious tolerance *must* be a basic societal tenet for the state to function.
Accordingly, whilst tolerance had been considered historically as a "concession" granted by the dominant religious movement or Church to other religious minorities, religious freedom appears in the Western civilization only once the political power is separated from the religious community.
In the letter, Locke argues that all religious practices should be tolerated unless they are a threat to the proper functioning of the state.
www.amazon.com /Letter-Concerning-Toleration-John-Locke/dp/1419101994   (2207 words)

  
 John Locke's Letter on toleration   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-09-10)
Since you are pleased to inquire what are my thoughts about the mutual toleration of Christians in their different professions of religion, I must needs answer you freely that I esteem that toleration to be the chief characteristic mark of the true Church.
Let anyone have never so true a claim to all these things, yet if he be destitute of charity, meekness, and good-will in general towards all mankind, even to those that are not Christians, he is certainly yet short of being a true Christian himself.
How great soever, in fine, may be the pretence of good-will and charity, and concern for the salvation of men's souls, men cannot be forced to be saved whether they will or no.
www.sullivan-county.com /news/deist1999/locke.htm   (13970 words)

  
 A Letter concerning Toleration   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-09-10)
When they are not strengthened with the civil power, then they can bear most patiently and unmovedly the contagion of idolatry, superstition, and heresy in their neighbourhood ; of which on other occasions the interest of religion makes them to be extremely apprehensive.
In the third place, let us see what the duty of toleration requires from those who are distinguished from the rest of mankind (from the laity, as they please to call us) by some ecclesiastical character and office ; whether they be bishops, priests, presbyters, ministers, or however else dignified or distinguished.
Concerning which it is manifest that those who have one and the same rule of faith and worship are of the same religion ; and those who have not the same rule of faith and worship are of different religions.
www.ac-nice.fr /philo/textes/Locke-Toleration.htm   (14453 words)

  
 Locke, A Letter Concerning Toleration (Epistola de Tolerantia) ToC: The Online Library of Liberty   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-09-10)
To impose such things therefore upon any people, contrary to their own judgment, is in effect to command them to offend God; which, considering that the end of all religion is to please him, and that liberty is essentially necessary to that end, appears to be absurd beyond expression.
But further: Things ever so indifferent in their own nature, when they are brought into the church and worship of God, are removed out of the reach of the magistrate’s jurisdiction, because in that use they have no connection at all with civil affairs.
It remains that I say something concerning those assemblies, which being vulgarly called, and perhaps having sometimes been conventicles, and nurseries of factions and seditions, are thought to afford the strongest matter of objection against this doctrine of toleration.
oll.libertyfund.org /Home3/HTML.php?recordID=0388   (14722 words)

  
 Locke : Second letter concerning toleration   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-09-10)
It is a response to the attack on A Letter concerning Toleration (1689, also anonymous, and by Locke) by Jonas Proast in his The Argument of the 'Letter concerning Toleration' Briefly Consider'd and Answer'd.
In the first letter Locke had claimed 'Toleration to be the chief Characteristical Mark of the True Church'.
His views on religious toleration continued to be the subject of controversy and he penned two more letters, the fourth of which was published posthumously.
www.library.usyd.edu.au /libraries/rare/modernity/locke3.html   (119 words)

  
 Locke, A Letter Concerning Toleration
Locke's Letter on Toleration was published in 1689, in Latin, and translated into English shortly afterwards by another hand.
It was prompted by the persecution of the French Protestants by the government of Louis XIV, and by suspicion that James II was planning persecution in England.
Their authority, whatever it is, 'ought to be confined within the bounds of the Church, nor can it in any manner be extended to civil affairs, because the Church itself is a thing absolutely separate and distinct from the Commonwealth', p.
www.humanities.mq.edu.au /Ockham/y67s20.html   (638 words)

  
 Some Jewish reflections on Locke's Letter Concerning Toleration Cross Currents - Find Articles   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-09-10)
By the same token, centuries after Locke urged toleration of minorities, we find ourselves in the surprising position--quite inconceivable in Locke's time and for a long time afterwards as well--of being the political majority in Israel.
But Locke himself considered toleration the most important issue of his time, and his work on toleration to be his most important contribution.
Not only was A Letter Concerning Toleration his first publication, but he returned to the issue, in response to objections, to publish a Second Letter (1690) and a Third (1692), and he was at work on a Fourth Letter when he died (1704).
www.findarticles.com /p/articles/mi_m2096/is_1_56/ai_n16462582?lstpn=search_sampler&lstpc=search&lstpr=external&lstprs=other&lstwid=1&lstwn=search_results&lstwp=body_middle   (953 words)

  
 A Letter Concerning Toleration
In this "letter" addressed to an anonymous "Honored Sir," Locke argues for a new understanding of the relationship between religion and government.
Deeply influenced by Empiricism, Locke develops a philosophy that is contrary to the one expressed by Thomas Hobbes in Leviathan, primarily because it supports toleration for various Christian denominations.
John Locke (1632–1704) was a 17th-century philosopher concerned primarily with society and epistemology.
www.ou.edu /cas/psc/booklocke2.htm   (485 words)

  
 John Locke: A Letter Concerning Toleration (1689)
No peace and security, no, not so much as common friendship, can ever be established or preserved amongst men o long as this opinion prevails, that dominion is founded in grace and that religion is to be propagated by force of arms.
But as in every Church there are two things especially to be considered - the outward form and rites of worship, and the doctrines and articles of things must be handled each distinctly that so the whole matter of toleration may the more clearly be understood.
I answer: What power can be given to the magistrate for the suppression of an idolatrous Church, which may not in time and place be made use of to the ruin of an orthodox one?
www.lonang.com /exlibris/locke/Toleration.htm   (13999 words)

  
 A Letter Concerning Toleration, by John Locke   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-09-10)
But as in every Church there are two things especially to be considered—the outward form and rites of worship, and the doctrines and articles of things must be handled each distinctly that so the whole matter of toleration may the more clearly be understood.
It may be said: “What if a Church be idolatrous, is that also to be tolerated by the magistrate?”; I answer: What power can be given to the magistrate for the suppression of an idolatrous Church, which may not in time and place be made use of to the ruin of an orthodox one?
Whereas if each of them would contain itself within its own boundsthe one attending to the worldly welfare of the commonwealth, the other to the salvation of souls—it is impossible that any discord should ever have happened between them.
worldebookfair.com /eBooks/Adelaide/l/l81t   (14201 words)

  
 Amendment I (Religion): John Locke, A Letter concerning Toleration
And therefore peace, equity, and friendship are always mutually to be observed by particular churches, in the same manner as by private persons, without any pretence of superiority or jurisdiction over one another.
These things are not lawful in the ordinary course of life, nor in any private house; and therefore neither are they so in the worship of God, or in any religious meeting.
If they are persuaded that they please God in observing the rites of their own country, and that they shall obtain happiness by that means, they are to be left unto God and themselves.
press-pubs.uchicago.edu /founders/print_documents/amendI_religions10.html   (2889 words)

  
 John Locke - A Letter Concerning Toleration - And Biblical Authority   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-09-10)
Whosoever, therefore, is sincerely solicitous about the kingdom of God and thinks it his duty to endeavour the enlargement of it amongst men, ought to apply himself with no less care and industry to the rooting out of these immoralities than to the extirpation of sects.
If any man err from the right way, it is his own misfortune, no injury to thee; nor therefore art thou to punish him in the things of this life because thou supposest he will be miserable in that which is to come.
place, let us see what the duty of toleration requires from those who are distinguished from the rest of mankind (from the laity, as they please to call us) by some ecclesiastical character and office; whether they be bishops, priests, presbyters, ministers, or however else dignified or distinguished.
www.piney.com /LockeTol.html   (15522 words)

  
 Amazon.ca: Two Treatises of Government and A Letter Concerning Toleration: Books: John Locke,Ian Shapiro   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-09-10)
Amazon.ca: Two Treatises of Government and A Letter Concerning Toleration: Books: John Locke,Ian Shapiro
Publisher: learn how customers can search inside this book.
Two Treatises of Government and A Letter Concerning Toleration (Paperback)
www.amazon.ca /Treatises-Government-Letter-Concerning-Toleration/dp/0300100183   (184 words)

  
 Amazon.co.uk: The Second Treatise of Government: AND A Letter Concerning Toleration (Dover Thrift Editions): Books: ...   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-09-10)
Amazon.co.uk: The Second Treatise of Government: AND A Letter Concerning Toleration (Dover Thrift Editions): Books: John Locke
His Letter Concerning Toleration rests on the same basic principles as his political theory; Locke's main argument for toleration is a corollary of his theory of the nature of civil society.
The basis of social and political philosophy for generations, these works laid the foundation of the modern democratic state in England and abroad.
www.amazon.co.uk /Second-Treatise-Government-Concerning-Toleration/dp/0486424642   (454 words)

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