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Topic: Abbasid


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  Abbasid. The Columbia Encyclopedia, Sixth Edition. 2001-05
The head of the Abbasid family became caliph as Abu al-Abbas as-Saffah late in 749.
The early years of Abbasid rule were brilliant, rising to true splendor under Harun al-Rashid, the fifth caliph, and to intellectual brilliance under his son al-Mamun (see Mamun, al-), the seventh caliph.
The conquests of Jenghiz Khan further lowered the prestige of the Abbasids, and in 1258 his grandson Hulagu Khan sacked Baghdad and overthrew the Abbasid caliphate.
www.bartleby.com /65/ab/Abbasid.html   (412 words)

  
 Abbasids
The Abbasids were all of one big family that claimed to descend from Abbas, an uncle of Muhammad.
The Shi'is of the period rejected the legitimacy of the Abbasid leadership.
In political terms, the Abbasid Caliphs became puppets in the hands of the Turkish military troops, and in 935 the title Emiru l-Umara was transferred to the chief of the Turkish soldiers.
i-cias.com /e.o/abbasids.htm   (403 words)

  
 Abbasids
The Abbasids came to power under the auspices of a Shi`ite movement which, they claimed, had transferred its loyalty to Muhammad b.
The reign of Harun al-Rashid (786-809) is widely regarded as the apex of Abbasid power and achievement, but it is during his reign that one begins to see signs of weakness.
The last Abbasid caliph was deposed by Selim I, the Ottoman conquerer of Syria and Egypt; thereafter the title of caliph was held by the Ottoman sultans.
www.princeton.edu /~batke/itl/denise/abbasids.htm   (1085 words)

  
  Abbasids
The Abbasids were all of one big family that claimed to descend from Abbas, an uncle of Muhammad.
The Shi'is of the period rejected the legitimacy of the Abbasid leadership.
In political terms, the Abbasid Caliphs became puppets in the hands of the Turkish military troops, and in 935 the title Emiru l-Umara was transferred to the chief of the Turkish soldiers.
lexicorient.com /e.o/abbasids.htm   (403 words)

  
  Abbasids
The Abbasids were the dynasty of caliphs who ruled the Islamic Empire from 750 until the Mongol conquest of the Middle East in 1258.
In 750 the Abbasids defeated the Umayyads and transferred the capital of the Caliphate from Damascus to Baghdâd, thereby shifting the empire's center from Syria to Iraq.
Abbasid was the dynastic name generally given to the caliphs of Baghdad, the second of the two great dynasties of the Muslim empire.
mb-soft.com /believe/txh/abbasid.htm   (2415 words)

  
  Abbasid - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
Abbasid (Arabic: العبّاسيّون Abbāsīyūn) was the dynastic name generally given to the caliphs of Baghdad, the second of the two great Sunni dynasties of the Islamic empire, that overthrew the Umayyad caliphs from all but Spain.
The Abbasid caliphs officially based their claim to the Caliphate on their descent from Abbas ibn Abd al-Muttalib (AD 566-652), one of the youngest uncles of the Islamic prophet Muhammad, by virtue of which descent they regarded themselves as the rightful heirs of Muhammad as opposed to the Umayyads.
Abbasid Caliphs on behalf of Mamluk Sultans of Cairo
en.wikipedia.org /wiki/Abbasid   (1552 words)

  
 NationMaster - Encyclopedia: Abbasid caliphate
Al-Muttaqi was the Abbasid caliph in Baghdad from 940 to 944.
Az-Zahir was the Abbasid Caliph in Baghdad from 1225 to 1226.
Al-Muti (or Obedient to the Lord) was the Abbasid Caliph in Baghdad from 946 to 974.
www.nationmaster.com /encyclopedia/Abbasid_caliphate   (8427 words)

  
 NationMaster - Encyclopedia: Abbasid
Abbasid (Arabic: العبّاسيّون Abbāsīyūn) was the dynastic name generally given to the caliphs of Baghdad, the second of the two great Sunni dynasties of the Islamic empire, that overthrew the Umayyad caliphs.
Abbasid (Arabic: العبّاسدين; al-ʿAbbāsidīn) was the dynastic name generally given to the caliphs of Baghdad, the second of the two great Sunni dynasties of the Muslim empire, that overthrew the Umayyad caliphs.
The Abbasid caliphs officially based their claim to the Caliphate on their descent from Abbas ibn Abd al-Muttalib (AD 566-652), one of the youngest uncles of the Prophet Muhammad, by virtue of which descent they regarded themselves as the rightful heirs of the Prophet as opposed to the Umayyads.
www.nationmaster.com /encyclopedia/Abbasid   (807 words)

  
 Abbasid   (Site not responding. Last check: )
Abbasid was the dynastic name generally given to the caliphs of Baghdad, the second of the two great Sunni dynasties of the Muslim empire.
The Abbasid caliphs officially based their claim to the throne on their descent from Abbas ibn Abd al-Muttalib (AD 566 - 652), one of the youngest uncles of Muhammad, in virtue of which descent they regarded themselves as the rightful heirs of the Prophet as opposed to the Umayyads.
The Abbasids also persecuted descendants of Ali ibn Abu Talib viewing them as threats, and this in turn earned the dynasty great disfavor with the Shia, who lost many of their leaders to the Abbasids.
www.serebella.com /encyclopedia/article-Abbasid.html   (618 words)

  
 HighBeam Encyclopedia - Abbasid   (Site not responding. Last check: )
ABBASID [Abbasid] or Abbaside, Arab family descended from Abbas, the uncle of Muhammad.
Arabs, Persians, and the advent of the Abbasids reconsidered.
Religious inquisition as social policy: the persecution of the 'Zanadiqa' in the early Abbasid Caliphate.
encyclopedia.infonautics.com /html/A/Abbasid.asp   (622 words)

  
 Abbasid
Abbasid (Arabic: العبّاسيّون, Abbāsīyūn) is the dynastic name generally given to the caliph of Baghdad, the second of the two great Sunni dynasties of the Islamic empire, that overthrew the Umayyad caliphs from all but Spain.
The Abbasid caliphs officially based their claim to the caliphate on their descent from Abbas ibn Abd al-Muttalib (AD 566-652), one of the youngest uncles of the Islamic prophet Muhammad, by virtue of which descent they regarded themselves as the rightful heirs of Muhammad as opposed to the Umayyads.
The Abbasids also appealed to non-Arab Muslims, known as mawali, who remained outside the kinship-based society of Arab culture and were perceived of as a lower class within the Umayyad empire.
articles.gourt.com /en/Abbasid   (1485 words)

  
 AllRefer.com - Abbasid (Middle Eastern History, Biography) - Encyclopedia
The Abbasids held the caliphate from 749 to 1258, but they were recognized neither in Spain nor (after 787) W of Egypt.
The early years of Abbasid rule were brilliant, rising to true splendor under Harun al-Rashid, the fifth caliph, and to intellectual brilliance under his son al-Mamun (see Mamun, al-), the seventh caliph.
The conquests of Jenghiz Khan further lowered the prestige of the Abbasids, and in 1258 his grandson Hulagu Khan sacked Baghdad and overthrew the Abbasid caliphate.
reference.allrefer.com /encyclopedia/A/Abbasid.html   (474 words)

  
 Egypt: History - Abbasid Period
One of the most significant trends established by the Abbasid rule were the use of Turkish war slaves.
The Tulunids under the Abbasids, Egypt was often loosely governed by the Baghdad Khalif's appointees, many of whom did not rule from Egypt.
The Abbasids had once again gained strength, and they sent a soldier named Mohammed Ibn Sulyman to regain control of the country, which he did in 905.
www.touregypt.net /habbasid.htm   (1777 words)

  
 MuslimHeritage.com - Topics   (Site not responding. Last check: )
Al-Mansur (754-775), the second Abbasid Caliph and in many ways the founder of the new dynasty, established the permanent seat of the Abbasid capital in the new city on the west bank of the Tigris river not far from the ruins of the old Sassanid Persian capital of Ctesiphon.
As the Abbasid dynasty came to power through a religiously motivated movement, and sought in religion the basis of unity and authority, the Koranic meaning was certainly in their mind.
On the whole, the history of the Abbasid art of gardening is almost exclusively connected with two cities, namely: Baghdad and Samarra, the second Abbasid capital built some 110 km north of Baghdad in 835 CE by the Caliph al-Mu'tasim.
www.muslimheritage.com /topics/default.cfm?ArticleID=316   (1770 words)

  
 Abbasid   (Site not responding. Last check: )
The Abbasid caliphs officially based their claim to thethrone on their descent from Abbas ibn Abdal-Muttalib (AD 566 - 652), one of the youngest unclesof Muhammad, in virtue of which descent they regarded themselves as the rightfulheirs of the Prophet as opposed to the Umayyads.
The Abbasids also persecuted descendants of Ali ibn Abu Talib viewing them as threats, and this in turnearned the dynasty great disfavor with the Shia, who lost many of their leaders to theAbbasids.
The Abbasids still maintained a feeble show of authority, confined to religious matters, in Egypt under the Mamelukes, but the dynasty finally disappeared with Motawakkil III, who wascarried away as a prisoner to Constantinople by Selim I.
www.therfcc.org /abbasid-6564.html   (509 words)

  
 Abbasid   (Site not responding. Last check: )
The Abbasid caliphs officially based claim to the throne on their descent Abbas ibn Abd al-Muttalib (AD 566 - 652) one of the youngest uncles of Muhammad in virtue of which descent they themselves as the rightful heirs of the as opposed to the Umayyads.
Mansur the second of the house who the seat of government to the new of Baghdad fought successfully against the peoples of Minor and the reigns of Harun al-Rashid (786 - 809) and al-Ma'mun (813 - 833) were periods of extraordinary splendour.
The Abbasids still maintained a feeble show authority confined to religious matters in Egypt under the Mamelukes but the dynasty finally disappeared with III who was carried away as a to Constantinople by Selim I.
www.freeglossary.com /Abbasid   (740 words)

  
 Abbasid Encyclopedia Articles @ StardustMemories.com (Stardust Memories)   (Site not responding. Last check: )
Their rule was finally ended in 1258, when Hulagu Khan, the Mongol conqueror, sacked Baghdad.
Descendants of the Abbasids live in modern day Iraq.
While this helped integrate Arab and Persian cultures, it alienated many of their Arab supporters, particularly the Khorasanian Arabs who had supported them in their battles against the Umayyads.
www.stardustmemories.com /encyclopedia/Abbasid   (1150 words)

  
 History of Islam
Death of the Abbasid Caliph Muktafi; accession of Muqtadir.
Death of the Abbasid Caliph Ar Radi, accession of Muttaqi.
Abdication of the Abbasid Caliph Al Muttih; accession of At Taii.
www.muslimaccess.com /sunnah/historyofislam/centuries/century10.html   (592 words)

  
 abasid1
The 'Abbasids themselves came from their retreat at Humaymah in southern Jordan, and in 749 the first 'Abbasid caliph, as-Saffah, was proclaimed in the mosque at Al-Kufah.
This rebellion was extremely serious for the 'Abbasid government: it laid to waste large areas of agricultural land, and the great trading port of Basra was taken and sacked in 871, the rebels burning mosques and houses and massacring the inhabitants with indiscriminate ferocity.
The political catastrophe of the 'Abbasid Caliphate was accompanied by economic collapse.
www.angelfire.com /nt/Gilgamesh/abasid1.html   (1996 words)

  
 Islam
After the Abbasid overthrow and massacre of the Omayyads, Spain was a place where their authority was never asserted.
The T.âhirids were the faithful Abbasid governors of Khurâsân, only beginning the process of drifting out of central control when the area was seized by the S.affârids.
After the Ommayads prevented the imposition of Abbasid authority in Spain, the first territories to be wholly alienated from the Caliphate were in North Africa -- the Maghrib, the "West." This was mostly a matter of heterodoxy.
www.friesian.com /islam.htm   (9016 words)

  
 World Civilizations Online Chapter 13 -- Chapter 13 Outline
Although the political unity of Islam was forever shattered, the last centuries of Abbasid rule witnessed a period of cultural creativity and the expansion of Islam into South and Southeast Asia and Africa.
The Abbasid caliphs maintained harems, in which both wives and concubines were secluded in the imperial chambers.
The prosperity of the later Abbasid period allowed the Muslim elite to obtain numerous slaves, many of which were taken or purchased from the non-Islamic regions that surrounded the empire.
occawlonline.pearsoned.com /bookbind/pubbooks/stearns_awl/chapter13/objectives/deluxe-content.html   (2401 words)

  
 Abbasid   (Site not responding. Last check: )
Abbasid provinces during the caliphate of [[Harun al-Rashid]] Abbasid was the dynastic name generally given to the caliphs of Baghdad, the second of the two great Shiite dynasties of the Muslim empire, that overthrew the Umayyid caliphs.
Abbasid coins during [[Harun al-Rashid's reign]] These fissures in their support led to immediate problems.
The Abbasids also found themselves at odds with the Shia, many of whom had supported their war against the Umayyads, since the Abbasids claimed legitimacy by their familial connection to Muhammed.
abbasid.iqnaut.net   (1059 words)

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