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Topic: Abessive case


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  Abessive case - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
The name abessive is derived from Latin abesse "to be away/absent", and is especially used in reference to Finno-Ugric languages.
In Martuthunira, the privative case is formed with two suffixes, -wirriwa and -wirraa.
In the Finnish language, the abessive case is formed with the suffix -tta or -ttä according to vowel harmony.
en.wikipedia.org /wiki/Abessive_case   (237 words)

  
 Declension - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
Nominative-accusative (or simply accusative): The argument (subject) of an intransitive verb is in the same case as the agent (subject) of a transitive verb; this case is then called the nominative case, with the patient (direct object) of a transitive verb being in the accusative case.
The trigger may be identified as the agent, patient, etc. Other nouns may be inflected for case, but the inflections are overloaded; for example, in Tagalog, the subject and object of a verb are both expressed in the genitive case when they are not in the trigger case.
The Status of Morphological Case in the Icelandic Lexicon by Eiríkur Rögnvaldsson.
en.wikipedia.org /wiki/Grammatical_case   (810 words)

  
 Vocative case - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
The vocative case (also called the fifth case) is the case used for a noun identifying the person (animal, object, etc.) being addressed and/or occasionally the determiners of that noun.
In Latin, e.g., the nominative case is lupus and the vocative case is lupe!
The vocative case in Romanian is inherited from Latin.
en.wikipedia.org /wiki/Vocative_case   (1568 words)

  
 Ablative case - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-10-16)
The ablative case is a case found in e.g.
In Latin, the ablative case has absorbed the functions of the old instrumental case and the former locative case.
In the Finnish language (suomi), the ablative case is the sixth of the locative cases with the basic meaning "from off of" - a poor English equivalent, but necessary to distinguish it from "from out of" which would be Elative case.
www.encyclopedia-online.info /Ablative_case   (165 words)

  
 Accusative case: Facts and details from Encyclopedia Topic   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-10-16)
The dative case is a grammatical case for nouns and/or pronouns....
The accusative case of a noun is the grammatical case used to mark the direct object of a verb....
Possessive case is a grammatical case that exists in some languages and is used to indicate a relationship of possession....
www.absoluteastronomy.com /encyclopedia/a/ac/accusative_case.htm   (1320 words)

  
 Accusative case - LearnThis.Info Enclyclopedia   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-10-16)
The accusative case of a noun is, generally, the case used to mark the direct object of a verb.
The same case is used in many languages for the objects of (some or all) prepositions.
This is the form in nominative case, used for the subject of a sentence.
encyclopedia.learnthis.info /a/ac/accusative_case.html   (370 words)

  
 Genitive_case
The genitive case is a grammatical case that indicates a relationship, primarily one of possession, between the noun in the genitive case and another noun.
These are sometimes not identified as the genitive case, and in many instances are not marked with the apostrophe, but these usages demonstrate use of nouns in the genitive case as adverbs in the Germanic language, indicating the time when the events described happen.
In Baltic-Finnic languages, the accusative case -(e)n is homophonic to the genitive case.
www.brainyencyclopedia.com /encyclopedia/g/ge/genitive_case.html   (1151 words)

  
 Nominative case - Biocrawler   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-10-16)
The nominative case is a grammatical case for a noun.
The nominative case is the usual, natural form (more technically, the least marked) of certain parts of speech, such as nouns, adjectives, pronouns and less frequently numerals and participles, and sometimes does not indicate any special relationship with other parts of speech.
In nominative-absolutive languages, the nominative case marks the subject of a transitive verb or a voluntary subject of an intransitive verb, but not an involuntary subject of an intransitive verb (for which the absolutive case is used).
www.biocrawler.com /encyclopedia/Nominative_case   (370 words)

  
 Venla - Glossary
Abessive case is a case that expresses the lack or absence of the referent of the noun it marks.
Genitive case is a case in which the referent of the marked noun is the possessor of the referent of another noun.
Partitive case is a case that expresses the partial nature of the referent of the noun it marks, as opposed to expressing the whole unit or class of which the referent is a part.
users.utu.fi /jmkark/kieli/glossary.html   (1154 words)

  
 Nominative case - QuickSeek Encyclopedia   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-10-16)
The nominative case is a grammatical case for a noun, which generally marks the subject of a verb, as opposed to its object or other verb arguments.
Therefore, in some languages the nominative case is unmarked, that is, the nominative word is the base form or stem, with no inflection; alternatively, it may said to be marked by a null morpheme.
Moreover, in most languages with a nominative case, the nominative form is the lemma; that is, it is the one used to cite a word, to list it as a dictionary entry, etc.
nominativecase.quickseek.com   (304 words)

  
 Dative case - QuickSeek Encyclopedia   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-10-16)
The dative case is a grammatical case generally used to indicate the noun to whom something is given.
The pronoun whom is also a remnant of the dative case in English, descending from the Old English dative pronoun "hwām" (as opposed to the nominative "who", which descends from Old English "hwā") — though "whom" also absorbed the functions of the Old English accusative pronoun "hwone".
In this case, the noun or pronoun's case is determined by the preposition, NOT by its function in the sentence.
dativecase.quickseek.com   (773 words)

  
 abessive case Information Center - abessive case
In linguistics, the Abessive case is a noun case expressing the lack and absence of something.
The case is found mainly in Finno-Ugric languages but can also be seen in Caucasian ones.
In the Finnish language, the Abessive case is rarely used, especially in the spoken language.
www.scipeeps.com /Sci-Linguistic_Topics_A_-_Co/abessive_case.html   (107 words)

  
 Partitive case - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-10-16)
Note: partitive case has to be distinguished from partitive meaning which refers to the selection of a part/quantity out of a group/amount, see Partitive.
The partitive case is a grammatical case which denotes "partialness", "without result", or "without specific identity".
In the Finnish language, this case is often used to express unknown identities and irresultative actions.
www.educhy.com /index.php/Partitive_case   (426 words)

  
 Abessive case: Facts and details from Encyclopedia Topic   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-10-16)
Adessive case In the finnish language, estonian language and hungarian language the adessive case is the fourth of the locative cases with the basic meaning of "on"....
Allative case In the finnish language, the allative case is the fifth of the locative cases, with the basic meaning of "onto"....
Absolutive case In ergative-absolutive languages, the absolutive case is used to mark the subject of an intransitive verb or the object of a transitive verb....
www.absoluteastronomy.com /a/abessive_case   (499 words)

  
 Prepositional case - QuickSeek Encyclopedia   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-10-16)
Prepositional case is a grammatical case that marks prepositions.
Since the case is also used to denote (most) locations it is frequently called locative case in English and some other languages.
The equivalent term is lokál (as opposed to lokatív) in Czech and in Slovak and miejscownik in Polish.
postpositionalcase.quickseek.com   (136 words)

  
 Estonian Inflection
The nominative case is used when the noun is the subject (or predicate) of the sentence.
The elative case is used to show something else is going outside of it, or made from it.
The translative case is also used as a short form of the postposition 'jaoks' to show what something is for.
www.cusd.claremont.edu /~tkroll/inflection.html   (413 words)

  
 Possessive case - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-10-16)
It is not the same as the genitive case, which can express a wider range of relationships, though the two have similar meanings in many languages.
The term "possessive case" is often used to refer to the "'s" morpheme, which is suffixed onto many nouns in English to denote possession.
This categorization is arguably not strictly correct — some grammarians contend that this affix is actually a clitic.
en.wikilib.org /wiki/Possessive_case   (167 words)

  
 Ergative vs. absolutive case - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-10-16)
The ergative case is used, in ergative-absolutive languages which inflect for case, to mark the subject of a transitive verb.
The absolutive case, in the same context, is used to mark
The ergative case is typically marked (most salient), while the absolutive case is unmarked.
www.encyclopedia-online.info /Ergative_case   (80 words)

  
 Instrumental_case info here at www.unfettered.info   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-10-16)
In linguistics the instrumental case indicates that a noun is the instrument or means by which the subject achieves or accomplishes an action.
In linguistics, the instrumental case (also called the eighth case) indicates that a noun is the instrument or means by which the subject achieves or accomplishes an action.
In Classical Greek, for example, the dative case is used as the instrumental case.
www.unfettered.info /Instrumental_case   (849 words)

  
 Vocative case - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-10-16)
The vocative case is the case used for a noun identifying the person (animal, object, etc.) being addressed and/or occasionally the determiners of that noun.
Historically, the vocative case was an element of the Indoeuropean system of cases, and existed in Latin, Sanskrit, and Classical Greek.
Examples are Modern Greek and Slavic languages such as Polish, Czech, Serbian, Croatian, Bosnian, Ukrainian, and the modern Celtic languages such as Scottish Gaelic and Irish.
www.educhy.com /index.php/Vocative_case   (1281 words)

  
 List of linguistic topics: Facts and details from Encyclopedia Topic   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-10-16)
In ergative-absolutive languages, the absolutive case is used to mark the subject of an intransitive verb or the object of a transitive verb....
In the finnish language, estonian language and hungarian language the adessive case is the fourth of the locative cases with the basic meaning of "on"....
In the finnish language, the allative case is the fifth of the locative cases, with the basic meaning of "onto"....
www.absoluteastronomy.com /enc2/list_of_linguistic_topics   (8257 words)

  
 What is case?
Case is a grammatical category determined by the syntactic or semantic function of a noun or pronoun.
The term case has traditionally been restricted to apply to only those languages which indicate certain functions by the inflection of
In the following sentence, case is indicated by the case markers ga, ni, and o:
www.sil.org /linguistics/GlossaryOfLinguisticTerms/WhatIsCase.htm   (140 words)

  
 Abessive - KutjaraWiki   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-10-16)
The abessive case (from Latin ab, away + esse, to be), sometimes called the caritive (from Latin carere, to lack), expresses the lack or absence of something—it is equivalent to the English preposition without.
Glossary of linguistic terms – What is abessive case?
Abessive · Ablative · Benefactive · Causative · Comitative · Dative · Elative · Equative · Essive · Genitive · Illative · Inessive · Instrumental · Lative · Locative · Oblique · Partitive · Possessive · Postpositional · Prepositional · Prolative · Superessive · Translative · Vocative
www.kutjara.com /wiki/index.php?title=Abessive   (122 words)

  
 caritive case - Wiktionary
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(grammar): case used to express the lack or absence of something.
It has the meaning of the English preposition "without." The caritive case is found in some Caucasian languages.
en.wiktionary.org /wiki/caritive_case   (57 words)

  
 ipedia.com: Dative case Article   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-10-16)
Grammatical cases List of grammatical cases Abessive case Ablative case Absolutive case Accusative case Adessive case Allative case Comitative case Dative case Dedative case Elative case Ergative case...
While the dative case is no longer a part of the English grammar, it survives in a few set expressions.
This collapse of the accusative and dative pronouns (which were distinct in Old English) into the same pronoun-set has led grammarians to discard the accusative/dative distinction in modern English grammar and refer to this combined form as the 'objective' (See also Declension in English).
www.ipedia.com /dative_case.html   (244 words)

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