Factbites
 Where results make sense
About us   |   Why use us?   |   Reviews   |   PR   |   Contact us  

Topic: Ablaut


Related Topics

In the News (Sat 25 May 19)

  
  Ablaut - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
The term "ablaut" was coined by the linguist Jacob Grimm, though the phenomenon was first described a century earlier by the Dutch linguist Lambert ten Kate in his book Gemeenschap tussen de Gottische spraeke en de Nederduytsche (1710).
Ablaut must be clearly distinguished from the later and unrelated phenomenon of umlaut (the fronting of vowels caused by a front vowel in a following syllable).
Various factors such as vowel harmony, assimilation with nasals, or the effect of the presence of laryngeals in the Indo-European roots and their subsequent loss in most daughter languages, mean that a language may have several different vowels representing a single vowel in the parent language.
en.wikipedia.org /wiki/Ablaut   (1623 words)

  
 Ablaut   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-10-06)
Verbs that display ablaut in English, and that do not form their preterites with a dental suffix like -ed or added -t or d, are called strong verbs.
Ablaut is a semi-regular phenomenon that affects whole classes of verbs in Ancient Greek and Sanskrit.
The ablaut is distinguished from the phonetic influence of a succeeding vowel, called umlaut.
www.yotor.com /wiki/en/ab/Ablaut.htm   (309 words)

  
 Ablaut -- Facts, Info, and Encyclopedia article   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-10-06)
The term "ablaut" was coined by the linguist (Click link for more info and facts about Jacob Grimm) Jacob Grimm, though the phenomenon was first described a century earlier by the Dutch linguist Lambert ten Kate in his book Gemeenschap tussen de Gottische spraeke en de Nederduytsche (1710).
Ablaut must be clearly distinguished from the later and unrelated phenomenon of (A diacritical mark (two dots) placed over a vowel in German to indicate a change in sound) umlaut (the fronting of vowels caused by a front vowel in a following syllable).
Various factors such as vowel harmony, assimilation with nasals, or the effect of the presence of (Click link for more info and facts about laryngeals) laryngeals in the Indo-European roots and their subsequent loss in most daughter languages, mean that a language may have several different vowels representing a single vowel in the parent language.
www.absoluteastronomy.com /encyclopedia/a/ab/ablaut.htm   (1444 words)

  
 Indo-European Linguistics: IE-Ablaut
Ablaut is the signalling of grammatical differences by altering the quantity and/or quality of the vowel(s) in a root.
Remnants of IE Ablaut are visible in English in verbs such as 'ride', which forms its preterite as 'rode' and its past-participle as 'ridden'.
Accented root-vowels became the e- and o-grades of the root (the full-grades), and unaccented roots became the zero-grade of the root.
www.utexas.edu /cola/depts/lrc/iedocctr/ie-ling/ie-ablaut.html   (601 words)

  
 Aorist - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
The aorist's second marker is a change in vowel grade, a process known as ablaut.
English further uses ablaut in extended forms, such as: sit, seat, sat, set (etymologically, to set is to cause to sit); lie, lay, lain, laid, layer; and sing, sang, sung, song.
In Latin, ablaut was a common marker of the aorist, for example: capiō "I take"; but cēpī "I took"; and Greek λειπω leipō "I leave", but ελιπον elipon "I left".
en.wikipedia.org /wiki/Aorist_aspect   (447 words)

  
 Robert Mailhammer   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-10-06)
This paper argues that the status of ablaut in the verbal system of Germanic is typologically distinct from that of Indo-European due to a fundamental change in verbal stem formation.
Germanic arranged its strong verbs according to ablaut patterns which are assigned solely on the basis of a verb’s root structure.
Ablaut is almost always used redundantly and it is not characteristic for a particular grammatical category, see Kury_owicz (1961:13).
linguistics.unimelb.edu.au /events/seminars/abstracts/2004/mailh.html   (520 words)

  
 Web Lecture 2.2
Ablaut involves the alternation of the vowel in a root: the vowels vary between
English still has a small set of verbs which are inflected by changing the vowel; they are relics of the ancient ablaut process.
It was somewhat like ablaut, in that it involved changing the internal structure of a root for grammatical purposes.
darkwing.uoregon.edu /~l150web/weblec2.2.html   (576 words)

  
 WEST GERMANIC STRONG VERB FACTS AND INFORMATION   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-10-06)
Strictly speaking, in this verb ''ablaut'' only causes a three-fold distinction: parts 1 and 2 are from the e-grade, part 3 from the o-grade, and parts 4 and 5 from the zero grade.
Although the verb ''to be'' is suppletive and highly irregular, its preterite follows the pattern of a class 4 strong verb, with grammatischer_Wechsel, and in English and Dutch this verb has retained the singular/plural distinction of both ablaut grade and consonant in the modern languages.
Possibly in some cases the ''a'' may be an example of the a-grade of ablaut, though this is controversial.
www.witwib.com /West_Germanic_strong_verb   (3760 words)

  
 Proto-Indo-European language - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-10-06)
However, by means of internal reconstruction and morphological (re-)analysis of the reconstructed, seemingly most archaic PIE word forms, it has recently been shown to be very probable that at a more distant stage (then: Early) PIE may have been a root-inflectional language like e.g.
As a consequence, it seems to be highly probable that PIE once was of the root-and-pattern morphological type (literature: Pooth (2004): "Ablaut und autosegmentale Morphologie: Theorie der uridg.
The Indo-European verb system is extremely complex and exhibits a system of ablaut which is preserved in the Germanic languages.
www.bucyrus.us /project/wikipedia/index.php/Proto-Indo-European_language   (882 words)

  
 OHG PRIMER - CHAPTER 12
The latter form their preterite by the addition of the syllable -ta, and their past participle by means of a t-suffix ; the former form their pret.
Ablaut is the gradation of vowels both in stem and suffix, caused by the primitive Indo-Germanic system of accentua­tion.
Although the series of vowels is seen most clearly in the stem-forms of strong verbs, the learner must not assume that ablaut occurs in strong verbs only.
mysite.wanadoo-members.co.uk /Marmaria/ohg/ohg_primer_12.htm   (1750 words)

  
 The Influence of Phonesthesia on the English Language
Secondary sound symbolism is the study of minor aspects of sound symbolism including ablaut modification, reduplication, spoonerisms, rhyming slang, malapropisms, and folk etymology.
Ablaut modification is the process whereby new words are formed by the modification of the vowel of an already existing word.
For examples of ablaut modification, see the end of my Dictionary of English Phonesthemes.
www.geocities.com /SoHo/Studios/9783/phonpap1.html   (1896 words)

  
 IHGG: Verb Definitions
In principle, five different word stems are formed by ablaut gradation, one for each of the five inflection classes of the German language.
That is because this particular type of ablaut gradation is nowadays considered archaic and somewhat affected.
The size of the ablaut classes is listed in the column Anzahl der Verben, which is the number of verbs in that sequence.
www.travlang.com /languages/german/ihgg/verbdef.html   (1263 words)

  
 Aorist aspect - Indopedia, the Indological knowledgebase
The aorist's third marker is a change in vowel grade, a process known as ablaut.
English further uses ablaut in extended forms, such as: sit, seat, sat, set (etymologically, to set is to cause to sit); and sing, sang, sung, song.
In Latin, ablaut was a common marker of the aorist, for example: "capio", "I take"; but "cepi", "I took"; and Greek "λειπω", "I leave", but "ελιπον", "I left."
www.indopedia.org /Aorist_tense.html   (588 words)

  
 About Ablaut   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-10-06)
The final -a is a stem-forming suffix that changes to -e when certain enclitics follow it, e.g., the diminutive =la.
This changing vowel is called 'the ablaut(ing) vowel' by modern Dakotanists, in spite of a general protest among Indo-Euorpeanists that this isn't quite what they had in mind by ablaut.
I suspect the Siouanists are actually thinking of the Proto-Indo-European thematic stem-formant -e/o-, which, of course, does ablaut, like several other PIE stem-formants, though it isn't "the ablaut vowel."
spot.colorado.edu /~koontz/notes/nt6.htm   (79 words)

  
 Take Our Word For It Issue 94
The habit of forming ablaut inflections was obviously so ingrained that we keep inventing them.
Many ablaut forms are no longer as obvious as sit and sat.
Mike's crutches enter this picture once again as crutch is an ablaut form of crotch which was originally a form of crook.
www.takeourword.com /Issue094.html   (2605 words)

  
 German Verb Classes
Mutations, at least as regards the German verbal system, are defined by Keller as "modifications of a stressed vowel under the influence of another vowel in a subsequent syllable." [2] This change is rather straightforward and leads to the differences in such verbs as stechen -- sticht, graben -- gräbt, and even voll -- füllen.
The Ablaut, however, is a much more ancient process, more peculiar to German, and in many ways more important than mutation.
This was a relatively narrow change, since the only vowels that were truly affected by it were e and a, but with the combination of mutation, Ablaut, and Abtönung, it is obvious that the alternations could become extremely complex, as indeed they did.
www.nthuleen.com /papers/130paper.html   (2427 words)

  
 Germanic languages - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-10-06)
The use of a dental suffix (/d/ or /t/) instead of vowel alternation (ablaut) to indicate past tense.
The presence of two distinct types of verb conjugation: weak (using dental suffix) and strong (using ablaut).
English has 161 strong verbs; all are of native English origin.
www.lighthousepoint.us /project/wikipedia/index.php/Germanic_languages   (629 words)

  
 Science Fair Projects - Ablaut   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-10-06)
Or else, you can start by choosing any of the categories below.
The term "ablaut" was coined by the linguist Jakob Grimm, though the phenomenon was first described a century earlier by the Dutch linguist Lambert ten Kate in his book Gemeenschap tussen de Gottische spraeke en de Nederduytsche (1710).
Ablaut must be clearly distinguished from the later and unrelated phenomenon of umlaut (the fronting of vowels caused by a font vowel in a following syllable).
www.all-science-fair-projects.com /science_fair_projects_encyclopedia/Ablaut   (1524 words)

  
 NHG Grammar: Ablaut   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-10-06)
der/das Band, der Bund) show a characteristic vowel alternation, which is called ablaut, sometimes apophony, sometimes vowel gradation.
Ablaut is a common Germanic phenomenon, and has parallels in other Indo-European language groups, so the origins of the alternation must lie in the Indo-European (maybe even pre-Indo-European) period.
However, no other IE family has systematized ablaut alternation to the same extent as Germanic, so it is generally believed that the systematic way in which ablaut is used in the Germanic languages reflects a Germanic innovation.
www.staff.ncl.ac.uk /jon.west/nhggr/nhggr_ablaut_data.htm   (184 words)

  
 Search Results for ablaut - Encyclopædia Britannica
The morphological use of vowel gradation (called ablaut) is well known from Indo-European languages (e.g., the vowel change in English sing, sang, sung) and is found in several Sino-Tibetan...
A comparative study of the Kartvelian languages enables specialists to outline the general structure of the parent language, called Proto-Kartvelian, which yielded the known Kartvelian, or South...
The ancient Greeks and Romans readily perceived that their languages were related to each other, and, as other European languages became objects of scholarly attention in the late Middle Ages and the...
www.britannica.com /search?query=ablaut&submit=Find&source=MWTAB   (323 words)

  
 Papers   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-10-06)
Dakota ablaut, previously regarded as a morphological process, is analyzed as coalescence of floating features driven by the phonology of the language.
Includes discussion of ablaut, as well as its presence/absence in reduplicated forms, the focus of the HUMDRUM presentation.
A shorter and revised version of the analysis in the MITWPL 42 paper.
www.georgetown.edu /faculty/jk395/myweb/papers.htm   (539 words)

  
 ablaut on Encyclopedia.com   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-10-06)
Phonological change resulted in alteration of syllable structure and in vowel gradation.
The n-less versus -n past participle forms of certain ablaut verbs in seventeenth and early eighteenth century American and British English.(Linguistics)
Reduplication and the Old English strong verbs class VII (1).
www.encyclopedia.com /html/a1/ablaut.asp   (350 words)

  
 Re: Natural language with the MOST irregular verbs?
In Gothic, these were still reduplicated, and mostly without Ablaut.
eC (iC) ~ oC ~ e:C ~ eC (iC) = Class V E6 eH Ablaut eH/oH/H/H > Gothic e: ~ o: ~ o: ~ e: + reduplication This is Gothic Class VII (Ablauting/reduplicating), e.g.
Besides this, Gothic also had verbs without Ablaut (sle:pan ~ sesle:p) (Gothic Class R-4).
www.usenet.com /newsgroups/sci.lang/msg07839.html   (928 words)

  
 SOUTHWEST JOURNAL OF LINGUISTICS
A new reconstruction of Kiowa-Tanoan consonantal ablaut is proposed that suggests that verb stems traditionally reconstructed as unablauted represent the historically ablauted form of the verb.
The proposed reconstruction suggests that historically ablauted forms originated in contexts of syntactic subordination.
Under this new conception of Kiowa-Tanoan ablaut (i) the ablaut altemations can be seen as phonologically regular, and (ii) the morphosyntactic distribution of ablaut in the modern Kiowa-Tanoan languages becomes coherent.
www.tamu-commerce.edu /swjl/public_html/swjl/94abstracts.html   (938 words)

  
 Irregular past tense formation in English interlanguage (ResearchIndex)   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-10-06)
Abstract: this article they argued that prototype theory can be applied to morphological classes, in particular ablaut classes in English verb morphology.
-ed, to construct past tense forms from given nonce verbs but that, to a certain extent, they also generalize certain ablaut patterns.
The probability of the respondents choosing ablaut instead of the more expectable regular past tense suffix...
citeseer.ist.psu.edu /plag00irregular.html   (157 words)

  
 [No title]
Date: Sat, 20 Apr 1996 03:35:05 -0400 Subject: Re: ablaut and Semitic On Sat, 20 Apr 1996 ProtoL@aol.com wrote: > I believe that -> e/I and -> o/u, depending on the > stress-accent in some languages, e.g.
Those who are interested in discussing this topic, which is only of antiquarian interest now anyway, should take the trouble to first read the relevant literature, starting with Kuipers and his earliest critics, who as I recall included W. Allen and Morris Halle.
Any and all serious linguists who try to compare IE with other language families do so by comparing whole families (or, equivalently, their protolanguages), not selected individual languages or branches.
oi.uchicago.edu /OI/ANE/ANE-DIGEST/V03/v03.n132   (5081 words)

Try your search on: Qwika (all wikis)

Factbites
  About us   |   Why use us?   |   Reviews   |   Press   |   Contact us  
Copyright © 2005-2007 www.factbites.com Usage implies agreement with terms.