Factbites
 Where results make sense
About us   |   Why use us?   |   Reviews   |   PR   |   Contact us  

Topic: Absalom Jones


Related Topics

  
  Absalom Jones - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
Absalom Jones (1746 - February 13, 1818), was an African American abolitionist and clergyman.
Jones was later ordained as the first African-American priest in the Episcopal Church in the USA.
Absalom Jones was also part of the first group of African-Americans to petition the U.S. Congress.
en.wikipedia.org /wiki/Absalom_Jones   (190 words)

  
 Article
Absalom Jones, Richard Allen and the other men got up…but they did not move to the back of the balcony where they were told to go.
Absalom Jones was born a slave in Delaware in 1746.
Absalom Jones was ordained a deacon, and then, a priest in the Episcopal Church in 1802.
staweb.sta.cathedral.org /ePubs/cArticle.asp?article=639&comesFrom=sn   (818 words)

  
 WE are the Joneses
Jones was also an important correspondent between the early inventors of photography, playing a crucial role in the exchange of ideas between the English and French experimenters with paper processes.
Jones won the United States Open golf championship in 1923, 1926, 1929, and 1930; he was US national amateur champion in 1924, 1925, 1927, 1928, and 1930, and won the British Open championship in 1926, 1927, and 1930.
Jones was a devout admirer of Karl Marx, whose doctrines he endeavoured to use as a basis for the reconstruction of chartism.
homepage.ntlworld.com /we.thejoneses/history1.htm   (2467 words)

  
 Worship That Works
Absalom Jones was responding to the matter of the stewardship of life, one that would have impact upon the future welfare and "well-care" of his family.
Although Absalom Jones preferred to remain a Methodist, a majority of the membership was so disaffected with Methodism because of their treatment at St. George's that they voted to conform to the polity and worship of the Episcopal Church.
Under Absalom Jones' able leadership and shared ministry with the people, as a condition of their reception into the Diocese of Pennsylvania the members of St. Thomas laid before the diocese three requirements for their admission: 1.That they be received as a body already organized: 2.
www.er-d.org /6087_27569_ENG_HTM.htm   (1728 words)

  
 Africans in America/Part 3/Portrait of Absalom Jones   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-10-09)
The most widely recognized image of the Reverend Absalom Jones, completed sometime prior to the winter of 1810, displays a dignity rarely allowed African subjects in 19th century art.
The portrait was painted by Raphaelle Peale, the oldest surviving child of the prominent Philadelphia portraitist Charles Willson Peale.
The senior Peale was pleased to discover that his son had "painted a Portrait in oil of Absalom Jones a very excellent picture of the Rev'd.
www.pbs.org /wgbh/aia/part3/3h85.html   (158 words)

  
 Absalom Jones 2004   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-10-09)
Kansas City, MO Born a slave in Delaware in 1746, Absalom Jones was the first Black American to be ordained in any denomination.
Absalom Jones, with the aid of Quakers and Episcopalians, erected the African Church.
Jones was ordained priest in 1802, yet he and his parishioners were not permitted to participate in Diocesan life.
www.diowestmo.org /AbsalomJones2004.htm   (279 words)

  
 Africans in America: WHYY
Absalom Jones became head of the St. Thomas' Episcopal Church, and frequently preached against slavery.
Absalom Jones also joined Richard Allen and James Forten in marshalling two thousand five hundred volunteers to fortify the city of Philadelphia against the approaching British army.
Richard Allen and Absalom Jones organized the fl community to assist the city in coping with that unknown disease which killed one in every ten of Philadelphia's inhabitants.
www.whyy.org /aina/people.html   (638 words)

  
 March 2004: Absalom Jones
Jones, the first fl American to be formally ordained as an Episcopal priest, was born into slavery and was able to buy his freedom at age 38.
Jones and others put their lives at risk for the benefit of the sick and dying.
Washington was honored for her "untiring, committed loyalty and service to church and community," said MaryRose Chappelle, general chair of the 2004 Absalom Jones Day Committee and a member of Calvary, D.C. Among her many achievements, Washington established an Absalom Jones memorial window and scholarship fund at St. Philip's.
www.edow.org /news/window/march2004/absalom.html   (624 words)

  
 Worship That Works
When we consider the Reverend Absalom Jones, we are first reminded of a man whose faith in and love for Jesus Christ served as an example of godly love and prophetic witness in the history of the Episcopal Church.
Absalom Jones was responding to the matter of the stewardship of life that would have impact on circumstances that circumscribed the future welfare of his family.
Under Absalom Jones' able leadership and shared ministry with the people, as a condition of their reception into the Diocese of Pennsylvania, the members of St. Thomas laid before the diocese three requirements for their admission: (1) That they be received as a body already organized.
www.er-d.org /6087_6178_ENG_HTM.htm   (1714 words)

  
 19th Century (N-S)
Jones believed that the church was not only a place of worship and religious education but also for general education, mutual aid and protest.
Absalom Jones was a tireless worker for the fl community, and for the city at large, in Philadelphia, especially during the yellow fever epidemic of 1793.
Absalom Jones was a leader in Philadelphia, but he was only one of the~ many African-Americans who had distinguished careers despite severe obstacles in the post-Revolutionary period.
www.delart.org /damdocent/19thns.html   (6677 words)

  
 Absalom Jones -- Facts, Info, and Encyclopedia article   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-10-09)
Absalom Jones (1746 - February 13, 1818), was an (additional info and facts about African American) African American (A reformer who favors abolishing slavery) abolitionist and (A member of the clergy and a spiritual leader of the Christian Church) clergyman.
He was born into slavery in (A Mid-Atlantic state; one of the original 13 colonies) Delaware.
Jones was later ordained as the first African-American (A clergyman in Christian churches who has the authority to perform or administer various religious rites; one of the Holy Orders) priest in the Episcopal Church in the USA.
www.absoluteastronomy.com /encyclopedia/a/ab/absalom_jones.htm   (188 words)

  
 ETSS
In his preaching, Absalom Jones made it clear that the liberation of his people was his ultimate goal, and in his pastoral ministry he demonstrated how they should care for one another on their way toward this goal.
Precisely because Absalom Jones grasped deeply Paul's metaphorical use of the concept of slavery, he was empowered to struggle literally with the institution of slavery.
If we take the example of Absalom Jones to heart, hearing the same evangelical call to freedom that he heard, we are not only confronted with the moral question of whether we will struggle with the racist legacy of slavery in the same way that he struggled with slavery itself.
www.etss.edu /Floyd1.shtml   (1616 words)

  
 [No title]
The Petition of Absalom Jones and Others, December 30, 1799, is one of the earliest surviving petitions sent to Congress by free fls living in Philadelphia.
Absalom Jones, (1746-1818) born in slavery in Delaware, was sold at the age of 16 to a Philadelphia shop keeper.
Jones founded the Free African Society with his friend Richard Allen, in 1787, the same year the Constitution was drafted.
chnm.gmu.edu /fairfaxtah/documents/absalomjones.doc   (943 words)

  
 New Page 1
Jones was born a slave in Delaware, but later moved to Philadelphia where he worked in a grocery store.
Jones became a lay preacher at St. George’s where he met Allen who was also a lay preacher.
One day Jones was on his knees praying at the front of the church a white man came up to him and told him that he needed to move to the back of the church so white people can see.
project1.caryacademy.org /south13   (445 words)

  
 Absalom Jones - TheBestLinks.com - African-American, February 13, 1818, 1746, ...
Absalom Jones - TheBestLinks.com - African-American, February 13, 1818, 1746,...
Absalom Jones, African-American, February 13, 1818, 1746, Abolitionist...
Absalom Jones (1746 - February 13, 1818), was an African-American abolitionist and Methodist.
www.thebestlinks.com /Absalom_Jones.html   (112 words)

  
 The Black Experience within the Episcopal Church
Jones was born a slave in Delaware in 1746.
Absalom Jones was ordained a deacon in 1795, and a priest in 1802.
Absalom Jones is still commemorated annually as the first Black Episcopal priest (in fact he was the first Black minister of any denomination ordained in the United States).
newark.rutgers.edu /~lcrew/blackexperience.html   (6185 words)

  
 African American Journey: Jones, Absalom   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-10-09)
Absalom Jones was a leader of the struggle to give fl Americans control over their religious worship.
Jones was born a slave in Sussex County, Delaware.
Jones bought his freedom in 1784 with money he had saved.
www.worldbook.com /features/aajourney/html/bh034.html   (180 words)

  
 Absalom Jones (Canterbury) Student Center   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-10-09)
The Absalom Jones (Canterbury) Student Center is the ministry of the Episcopal Diocese of Atlanta to the Atlanta University Center (the world's largest consortium of historically-fl colleges and universities).
The center was founded in 1958 and is named for the former slave and first African-American Episcopal priest, Absalom Jones (pictured on left).
Jones was an impressive teacher and pastor and an important figure in the history of the Episcopal Church.
www.absalomjones.org   (124 words)

  
 African Methodist Episcopal Church - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
The church was born in protest against slavery—against dehumanization of African people, brought to the American continent as cheap labor.
The incident that led to this was the removal of Absalom Jones (1746–1818) from St. George's by the trustees while he was in the act of prayer.
The congregation supported the act of the trustees, and Allen and Jones led the African-American members to form the Bethel African Methodist Episcopal Church in 1793.
en.wikipedia.org /wiki/A.M.E._Church   (1315 words)

  
 WFotW ~ Faulkner Glossary: "J"
Jones, Januarius: A fellow of Latin in a small college, and a fat, satyr-like man who literally pursued several women attempting to seduce them in Soldiers' Pay.
Jones, Milly: (1853-August 12, 1869) The daughter of Melicent Jones and granddaughter of Wash Jones, who cared for her after her mother apparently wound up in a Memphis brothel.
In 1869 she gave birth to a daughter fathered by Thomas Sutpen, who spurned her when he discovered the child was not a boy.
www.mcsr.olemiss.edu /~egjbp/faulkner/glossaryj.html   (705 words)

  
 Vignettes: Ministers Richard Allen and Absalom Jones   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-10-09)
Jones, meanwhile, attacked slavery from his pulpit at St. Thomas African Episcopal Church.
In 1799, Jones petitioned the U.S. House of Representatives to repeal the Fugitive Slave Act of 1793.
Though unsuccessful, Jones argued, "In the Constitution and in the Fugitive Slave bill, no mention is made of Black people or slaves, therefore if the Bill of Rights…[is] of any validity, we beseech that as we are men, we may be admitted to partake of the Liberties [sic] and unalienable rights therein held forth."
www.cr.nps.gov /ugrr/vignettes_allenjones.htm   (144 words)

  
 Stewardship of the James Dexter Site: Considerations
Absalom Jones’ roots were also in Delaware, where he had been born into slavery.
Along with the need to fashion a form of religious expression that addressed the values and experience of the group's members, there was also a desire to escape the indignities and injustice at the hands of a white religious hierarchy with congregations which were, at best, patronizing and often hostile.
Absalom Jones led a group that founded and built the African Episcopal Church of St. Thomas.
www.nps.gov /inde/archeology/dexter2.htm   (4887 words)

  
 Enslaved Africans   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-10-09)
Absalom Jones, born in Delaware as a slave in 1746, taught himself how to read.
In 1804, Jones was ordained by Bishop William White as the first African Episcopal priest.
Absalom Jones died in 1818 as a man of conviction and moral heroic leader who not only preached the word of God, but also practiced his beliefs.
astro.temple.edu /~stewartd/absalomjones.html   (189 words)

  
 Free Culture
The one notable exception is a poem she wrote to the Earl of Dartmouth in which she describes vividly the cruelty of her kidnapping from Africa.
When a group of worshippers, including Absalom Jones, were forcibly evacuated from a Methodist church during prayer, the group formed their own church.
   Absalom Jones, the first man to be evacuated from the Methodist church, set up his own Episcopalian Church.
www.wsu.edu:8000 /~dee/DIASPORA/FREE.HTM   (1720 words)

  
 George F. Bragg (George Freeman), 1863-1940. Richard Allen and Absalom Jones, by the Rev. George F. Bragg, in Honor of ...
Absalom Jones and Richard Allen were the "overseers" of this new organization.
The Reverend Absalom Jones, the first minister of St. Thomas Church, though very deficient in literary qualifications for the ministry, was a 'man of good report and godly conversation.' He was held in great reverence and esteem by the colored people of our city.
It is worthy of special note that Absalom Jones and Richard Allen, the acknowledged leaders of the race, in those times, were not only of great moral elevation, but were men of means.
docsouth.unc.edu /neh/bragg1915/bragg1915.html   (6782 words)

  
 Absalom Jones   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-10-09)
In 1787, fl Christians organized the Free African Society, the first organized Afro-American society, and Absalom Jones and Richard Allen were elected overseers.
He denounced slavery, and warned the oppressors to "clean their hands of slaves." To him, God was the Father who always acted on "behalf of the oppressed and distressed." But it was his constant visiting and mild manner that made him beloved by his own flock and by the community.
Known as "the Black Bishop of the Episcopal Church," Jones was an example of persistent faith in God and in the Church as God's instrument.
www.geocities.com /episcopal23/jones.html   (351 words)

Try your search on: Qwika (all wikis)

Factbites
  About us   |   Why use us?   |   Reviews   |   Press   |   Contact us  
Copyright © 2005-2007 www.factbites.com Usage implies agreement with terms.