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Topic: Absolutism


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  Absolutism
Absolutism was represented here as a consequence of the Enlightenment's replacement of Christianity as the commonly agreed source of rights by the concept of enlightened natural law.
Absolutism was also believed to be a consequence of the rise of the modern centraliz ed state since the 16th century and the destruction of the Medieval civil order based on clear hierarchies and estates.
Especially after Hegel's representation of the state as an appearance of the "absolute," the historical era of absolute monarchy was regarded as an early form of the modern state.
www.ohiou.edu /~Chastain/ac/absoluti.htm   (1014 words)

  
  Absolutism - LoveToKnow 1911
ABSOLUTISM, in aesthetics, a term applied to the theory that beauty is an objective attribute of things, not merely a subjective feeling of pleasure in him who perceives.
The fact that, in practice, the judgments even of connoisseurs are perpetually at variance, and that the so-called criteria of one place or period are more or less opposed to those of all others, is explained away by the hypothesis that individuals are differently gifted in respect of the capacity to appreciate.
(See Aesthetics.) In political philosophy absolutism, as opposed to constitutional government, is the despotic rule of a sovereign unrestrained by laws and based directly upon force.
www.1911encyclopedia.org /Absolutism   (160 words)

  
  Moral absolutism - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
"Absolutism" is often philosophically contrasted with moral relativism, which is a belief that moral truths are relative to social, cultural, historical or personal references, and to situational ethics, which holds that the morality of an act depends on the context of the act.
Moral absolutists might, for example, judge slavery, war, dictatorship, the death penalty, or childhood abuse to be absolutely and inarguably immoral regardless of the beliefs and goals of a culture that engages in these practices.
This rare view of moral absolutism might be contrasted with moral consequentialism—the view that the morality of an action depends on the context or consequences of that action.
en.wikipedia.org /wiki/Moral_absolutism   (1011 words)

  
 Absolutism - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
Absolutism (see Absolute truth), the contention that in a particular domain of thought, all statements in that domain are either absolutely true or absolutely false
Enlightened absolutism, a term used to describe the actions of absolute rulers who were influenced by the Enlightenment (eighteenth and early nineteenth century Europe)
Moral absolutism, the position that there are absolute standards against which moral questions can be judged, and that certain actions are good or evil, regardless of the context of the act
en.wikipedia.org /wiki/Absolutism   (200 words)

  
 [No title]
Absolutism was a result of the lengthy political crisis and the acute state of emergency which resulted from the last of the Karl Gustav wars against Sweden in 1657-1660.
Absolutism is a system in which one man has absolute power over the people.
Absolutism is defined as the political idea that absolute power should be vested in a single ruler.
www.lycos.com /info/absolutism.html   (539 words)

  
 Political absolutism - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
Absolutism is a political theory which argues that one person, who is often generally a monarch, should hold all power.
Prominent theorists associated with absolutism include Augustine of Hippo, Paul of Tarsus, Jacques-Bénigne Bossuet, Robert Filmer and Thomas Hobbes.
Were it not for their empowered subjects, however, both were said to have had designs on establishing an absolute monarchy.
en.wikipedia.org /wiki/Political_absolutism   (351 words)

  
 ABSOLUTISM - LoveToKnow Article on ABSOLUTISM
The fact that, in practice, the judgments even of connoisseurs are perpetually at variance, and that the so-called criteria of one place or period are more or less opposed to those of all others, is explained away by the hypothesis that individuals are differently gifted in respect of the capacity to appreciate.
In political philosophy absolutism, as opposed to constitutional government, is the despotic rule of a sovereign unrestrained by laws and based directly upon force.
In the strict sense such governments are rare, but it is customary to apply the term to a state at a relatively backward stage of constitutional development.
2.1911encyclopedia.org /A/AB/ABSOLUTISM.htm   (163 words)

  
 Absolutism
This person was not to be questioned or disobeyed; this became known as "absolutism," since the monarch ruled with "absolute" power, that is, unshared power.
All of these monarchs attempted to rule their countries with an absolute and iron fist while instituting reforms based on Enlightenment principles.
Enlightened absolutism was essentially an attempt to justify absolute power in its capacity to create a better life for its subjects, which included establishing rights, which are, as you know, principles of self-rule.
www.wsu.edu /~dee/GLOSSARY/ABSOLUTE.HTM   (654 words)

  
 Absolutism
Absolutism is a type of national monarchy in which the monarch has great power and tends to be looked up to with awe and reverence.
Absolute government involved centralizing political power in the hands of a monarch, who allied with and exercised control over the traditional landed aristocracy, gained loyalty and support from the merchant rulers of cities, and exercised power through a bureacracy and a standing army.
The characteristics of absolutism which developed in eastern Europe by the seventeenth century were considerably different from that of France and Spain in the west.
www2.sunysuffolk.edu /westn/absolutism.html   (931 words)

  
 Absolutism Notes
Absolute rulers asserted their supreme right to proclaim laws and levy taxes, appointing more officials to carry out the details of government and multiplying fiscal demands on their subjects.
Absolutism was at least in part an attempt to reassert public order and coercive state authority after wars of religion had raged through much of Europe.
Absolute monarchs lent their authority and prestige to the Catholic Church, the support of which, in turn, seemed to legitimize absolute monarchical power.
www.angelfire.com /folk/dr_smithers/150absolutism.htm   (1850 words)

  
 Reference.com/Encyclopedia/Absolutism
Absolute truth, the contention that in a particular domain of thought, all statements in that domain are either absolutely true or absolutely false
Moral absolutism, the position that there are absolute standards against which moral questions can be judged, and that certain actions are good or evil, regardless of the context of the act
Absolute monarchy, a form of government where the monarch has the power to rule their land freely, with no laws or legally-organized direct opposition in force
www.reference.com /browse/wiki/Absolutism   (208 words)

  
 AMBIGUOUS ABSOLUTISM AND AMSOLUTE AMBIGUITY
As an example, while the ambiguous absolute mindset is quick to accept dowsing as a real phenomenon, the absolutely ambiguous mind looks to other possibilities and responds with an affirmation of possibility countenanced by testing dowsers' claims, such as with challenging dowsing and dowsers to find a location where there is no water.
The former, however, is the consequence of ambiguous absolutism leading to a "belief" without proof of everything from angels, aliens and alien abduction, god or gods, crystals, to psychic phenomenon, telepathy, witches, warlocks and evil spirits.
Absolutism, may be historically defined as a sovereign power vested in an ultimate authority of the state resting in the hands of one that rules, often, by perceived divine right.
www.sover.net /~jozef/ac4t0202.html   (2209 words)

  
 Bloomsbury.com - Research centre
Absolutism is rule not limited by any formal constraint, legal, constitutional or conventional; its power is unchecked, and its 'laws' are the commands of the ruler (the sovereign) who is not subject to law.
Absolutism is necessarily an ideal, as no ruler ever fully controls all his or her subjects.
They thought absolute government was not only preferable to feudalism but was also the only way to avoid the violence characteristic of human beings in 'a state of nature'.
www.bloomsburymagazine.com /ARC/detail.asp?entryid=101823&bid=2   (176 words)

  
 ::Absolutism and France::
Absolutism within France was a political system associated with kings such as Louis XIII and, more particularly, Louis XIV.
Absolutism or absolute monarchical rule was developing across Europe during the Sixteenth and Seventeenth Centuries.
Absolute rule meant that the power of the monarch was, in theory, unlimited except by divine law or by what was called ‘natural law’.
www.historylearningsite.co.uk /absolutism_and_france.htm   (486 words)

  
 Absolutism - Search Results - MSN Encarta
Absolutism political system in which total power is vested in a single individual or a group of rulers.
On the death of Cardinal Mazarin in 1661 Louis XIV announced that henceforth he would be his own first minister.
- something absolute: a standard, principle, or theory that is...
uk.encarta.msn.com /Absolutism.html   (124 words)

  
 ABSOLUTISM
Absolutism, whether predicated upon the Divine Right of Kings or the Social Contract, was the only way in which humanity's latent inhumanity can be controlled.
After a number of defeats, Louis was compelled to accept the Treaty of Utrect in 1713.  Under the conditions of the treaty, Louis' grandson received the Spanish throne, with the stipulation that France and Spain would never be governed by the same monarch.
Russian absolutism reached its peak in 1682, when Peter I, also known as Peter the Great, ascended to the Russian throne.  Standing around 6'7'', Peter was a giant of a man, and his intellectual stature matched that of his body.
www.worldciv1.homestead.com /ABSOLUTISM.html   (1314 words)

  
 Non-absolutism and Omniscience
Is non-absolutism is absolute, it is not universal since there is one real which is absolute and if non-absolutism is itself non-absolute, it is not an absolute and universal fact.
Absolute to be absolute presupposes a relative somewhere and in some forms, even the relative of its non-existence.
"He is in possession of absolute truth, transcending the realm of provisional truths." This is the state of supreme knowledge, free from all limitations, where "the soul vibrates at its natural rhythm and exercises its function of unlimiting knowledge." This is another name of pure perception or infinition in epistemology and mysticism in religion.
www.jainworld.com /jainbooks/ramjees/nonabsolute.htm   (2620 words)

  
 [U04] Values - Moral absolutism and moral contextualism
Moral absolutism is the view that some actions are morally required or morally prohibited regardless of the situation and the potential consequences.
Others might also hold some form of moral absolutism with regard to abortion and homosexuality, believing (perhaps for religious reasons) that they are never justified.
Obviously, moral contextualism with regard to an action X is inconsistent with moral absolutism with regard to X. Unlike Kant, most of us would probably think that when a murderer wants to find out where a person is in order to kill him, we should lie if it would save that person's life.
philosophy.hku.hk /think/value/absolutism.php   (589 words)

  
 "Absolutism in the Seventeenth Century", essay by Tyler Jones
Absolutism, the political situation in which a monarch controls all aspects of government with no checks or balances, had been introduced in England by James I and Charles I, but never quite took hold.
In France, on the other hand, Louis XIV took absolutism to extremes, claiming to be a servant of God (the "divine right of Kings") and dissolving France's only general assembly.
Why absolutism failed in England but flourished in France is due mainly to the political situation in each country when the idea was first introduced.
www.june29.com /Tyler/nonfiction/absolute.html   (833 words)

  
 Absolutism and Freedom of Expression
Principal emphasis is placed on the difficult conditions of freedom of expression under Absolutism, which extended from 1661 to 1848.
Following the introduction of Absolutism, the newspapers were excepted from general censorship by Copenhagen University and placed under the German Chancellery [1].
After the fall of Absolutism, the March Ministry, a conservative/liberal government, complied with the public demand for freedom of expression in a provisional regulation of 24 March 1848.
www.ifla.org /faife/papers/riga/christia.htm   (4436 words)

  
 Absolutism
This person was not to be questioned or disobeyed; this became known as "absolutism," since the monarch ruled with "absolute" power, that is, unshared power.
All of these monarchs attempted to rule their countries with an absolute and iron fist while instituting reforms based on Enlightenment principles.
Enlightened absolutism was essentially an attempt to justify absolute power in its capacity to create a better life for its subjects, which included establishing rights, which are, as you know, principles of self-rule.
www.wsu.edu:8001 /~dee/GLOSSARY/ABSOLUTE.HTM   (654 words)

  
 Science & Absolutism   (Site not responding. Last check: )
Those who criticize the residual absolutism of science apparently fail to comprehend the potentially radical nature of the relativism that they suggest.
It is then difficult to argue that there is not a strong historical tie between the absolute laws of God and of science.
If science were to forego its absolutism, as many people propose, then immaterialism becomes a leading contender to replace the present materialism.
home.comcast.net /~dantsmith/aAquarium/ScienceAbsolutism.html   (766 words)

  
 Absolutism
The idea of the ways of absolutism came around after the theory of the divine right of kings.
This belief simply states that God ordained certain individuals to govern and that justification for absolutism came from the power of God as well.
The leader to show the way and is considered the father of absolutism was Louis XIV.
www.absolutism-n-constitutionalism.freehomepage.com /custom4.html   (75 words)

  
 Reign of Louis XIV
Absolute monarchy or absolutism meant that the sovereign power or ultimate authority in the state rested in the hands of a king who claimed to rule by divine right.
There was also a large gulf between the theory of absolutism as ex pressed by Bossuet and the practice of absolutism.
Although Louis may have believed in the theory of absolute monarchy and consciously fostered the myth of himself as the Sun King, the source of light for all of his people, historians are quick to point out that the reali ties fell far short of the aspirations.
www.stetson.edu /~psteeves/classes/louisxiv.html   (1173 words)

  
 [No title]
An absolute monarch is a ruler whose power is unlimited, this is known as absolutism.
The political parties, which are protesting against the King, have already said the appointment of a prime minister was not as major an issue as the restoration of democracy.
Absolutism inhibits people thinking for themselves and prevents debate because it allows for no choice, there being only one morally correct path.
www.lycos.com /info/absolutism--miscellaneous.html?page=2   (371 words)

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