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Topic: Absolutive case


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  Absolutive case - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
) is the grammatical case used to mark both the subject of an intransitive verb and the object of a transitive verb.
In the languages of this kind, the ergative case is typically marked (most salient), while the absolutive case is unmarked.
For this reason, words in absolutive case are usually used as the lemma to represent a lexeme.
en.wikipedia.org /wiki/Absolutive_case   (157 words)

  
 Ergative case
Two major case systems found in languages are the nominative-accusative and the ergative-absolutive.
The first form is the absolutive case and the second form is the ergative case.
See also nominative case, absolutive case, accusative case, dative case, genitive case, vocative case, ablative case; compare to ergative verb.
www.ebroadcast.com.au /lookup/encyclopedia/er/Ergative.html   (297 words)

  
 Absolutive case: Definition and Links by Encyclopedian.com
as opposed to the absolutive case which is assigned to: 1.
The subject of an intransitive verb....first form is the absolutive case and the second form is the ergative case.
In ergative languages, the Absolutive case marks the subject of a intransitive verb and object of transitive verb.
www.encyclopedian.com /ab/Absolutive-case.html   (189 words)

  
 Case - CDLI Wiki   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-11-03)
There are three nominal cases that should probably be categorized as core or grammatical in nature: the zero-marked absolutive/nominative case, the ergative case-marking postposition /*-e/, which is formally identical with the locative-terminative case-marking postposition, and the genitive case-marking postposition /*-a/.
The allative, known in the older literature as the terminative case, is usually associated with the *-ši- verbal infix.
The locative is often associated with the *-ni- verbal infix, or alternatively with the *-a- verbal infix.
cdli.ucla.edu /wiki/index.php/Case   (730 words)

  
 absolutive case Information Center - absolutive case
In ergative-absolutive languages, the absolutive is the grammatical case used to mark both the subject of an intransitive verb and the object of a transitive verb.
It contrasts with the ergative case, that marks the subject of transitive verbs.
For this reason, words in absolutive case are usually used absolutive case as the lemma to represent a lexeme.
www.scipeeps.com /Sci-Linguistic_Topics_A_-_Co/absolutive_case.html   (131 words)

  
 Morphosyntactic alignment - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-11-03)
In a language with morphological case marking, the experiencer and agent are both marked with the nominative case or sometimes unmarked, while the patient is marked with the accusative case.
The agent is marked with the ergative case, while the experiencer and patient are marked with the absolutive case or often left unmarked.
The first form is in the absolutive case, marked here by a null morpheme (-∅) and the second form is in the ergative case, marked by a -k suffix.
88.208.194.172 /wiki/index.php/Morphosyntactic_alignment   (1331 words)

  
 Declension Info - Bored Net - Boredom   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-11-03)
The case does not depend on whether a verb is used in a transitive or intransitive form.
The trigger may be identified as the agent, patient, etc. Other nouns may be inflected for case, but the inflections are overloaded; for example, in Tagalog, the subject and object of a verb are both expressed in the genitive case when they are not in the trigger case.
Positional: Nouns are not inflected for case; the position of a noun in the sentence expresses its case.
www.borednet.com /e/n/encyclopedia/d/de/declension.html   (402 words)

  
 CASES AND POSTPOSITIONS
Notice that one case morpheme attached at the end suffices to mark the entire Noun phrase; that is, we do not have to attach an ergative marker to each of the words of the Noun phrase in (1a), nor do we have to add more than one dative marker in (1b).
The gloss for the invisible morpheme in the absolutive case is 'A'.
In both cases, the distinction involves the addition of a morpheme: ga in the case of animates, ta in the case of inanimate phrases lacking a singular determiner.
www.ehu.es /grammar/gram3.htm   (3626 words)

  
 Absolutive case   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-11-03)
In ergative-absolutive languages, the absolutive case is used to mark the subject of an intransitive verb or the object of a transitive verb.
In such languages, the ergative case is typically marked (most salient), while the absolutive case is unmarked.
In nominative-absolutive languages, the absolutive case marks the object of a transitive verb or an involuntary subject of an intransitive verb.
absolutive-case.iqnaut.net   (80 words)

  
 [No title]
The case marker used for transitive agents is called ergative case, while the case marker (often zero, as in Walmatjari) used for transitive patients and intransitive subjects is called absolutive case.
In (13a), the absolutive argument (i.e., the transitive patient) of the second clause is missing; it is interpreted as being coreferential with the absolutive argument of the first clause (‘man’).
The absolutive case marking on the agent follows the regular rules of morphological case assignment in the language; and as absolutive argument, the agent bears the grammatical subject relation in the antipassive clause.
www.stanford.edu /~bresnan/128_2002/kroeger-ch11.doc   (8256 words)

  
 Dative case - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-11-03)
The dative case is a grammatical case generally used to indicate the noun to whom something is given.
The pronoun whom is also a remnant of the dative case in English, descending from the Old English dative pronoun "hwām" (as opposed to the nominative "who", which descends from Old English "hwā") — though "whom" also absorbed the functions of the Old English accusative pronoun "hwone".
In this case, the noun or pronoun's case is determined by the preposition, NOT by its function in the sentence.
88.208.194.172 /wiki/index.php/Dative_case   (709 words)

  
 Genitive case information - Search.com   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-11-03)
The genitive case (also called the second case) is a grammatical case that indicates a relationship, primarily one of possession, between the noun in the genitive case and another noun.
In the case of constellations, it is useful to know the genitive of the constellation's Latin name, since this is used to make the Bayer designation of stars in that constellation.
In Baltic-Finnic languages, the accusative case -(e)n is homophonic to the genitive case.
c10-ss-1-lb.cnet.com /reference/Genitive_case   (933 words)

  
 Dave's Language Creation Notebook
The accusative case is a case that (usually) marks the direct object of a transitive verb in nominative-accusative languages.
The absolutive case is a case that marks the subject of intransitive verbs and the direct object of transitive verbs in ergative-absolutive languages.
Thus, the case assigned to both the subject and object of a transitive verb is the duative, and the case assigned to the single argument of an intransitive verb is the unitive.
dedalvs.free.fr /notes/ergativity.php   (10172 words)

  
 Cases in Indo-European Languages: an article by Cyril Babaev
Case is a grammar category of nominal parts of speech which expresses their syntactic relation to other words of the sentence.
Ergative case functions as the subject and indirect object, absolutive case - as the subject and the direct object.
Nominative was the case of the subject in the sentence.
indoeuro.bizland.com /archive/article10.html   (2973 words)

  
 Uhli Morphology   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-11-03)
Absolutive case is used for the subject of intransitive verbs and the object of transitive verbs.
Dative case is used for indirect objects and the third argument of a causative.
Genitive case is used to mark the noun as a possessor.
bellsouthpwp.net /s/h/sharaya/umorph.html   (662 words)

  
 Ergative vs. absolutive case
The ergative case is used, in ergative-absolutive languages which inflect for case, to mark the subject of a transitive verb.
The absolutive case, in the same context, is used to mark
The ergative case is typically marked (most salient), while the absolutive case is unmarked.
publicliterature.org /en/wikipedia/e/er/ergative_vs__absolutive_case.html   (58 words)

  
 Chicago Linguistic Society
case is available for the object in the former but not in the latter.
Additional evidence for this analysis comes from a second evidential strategy in the language based on the periphrastic perfect, where the mere omission of the be auxiliary also yields an evidential reading.
One is the animacy of the subject, regardless of predicate type, and the other is a generalized notion of `activity' with respect to the predicate, which includes statives which can be true at intervals (Dowty 1979).
humanities.uchicago.edu /orgs/cls/conf/case_voice.html   (708 words)

  
 Somali Noun Morphophonology
In general, case marking is phrasal, and is only implemented on the last element in a noun phrase, which may or may not be a noun.
The premodier form is either the absolutive or a version of the absolutive with final H tone.
All nouns in the genitive have the tone pattern LH, or H in the case of a monosyllable (at least in Saeed's tone marking).
www.ling.upenn.edu /courses/Spring_1998/ling502/nouns.htm   (1099 words)

  
 7.3. Case
Both the locative and the ergative cases are marked with the suffix <-e> or <-ʔe>.
The vocative case is used in directly addressing entities possessed of a soul, such as animals, humans, gods and personified ideas or objects.
The comparative case consists of the locative/ergative suffix <-(ʔ)e> and the suffix and is used in comparisons.
www.valdyas.org /~boud/barushlani/ch07s03.html   (282 words)

  
 Iltârer Nouns
The absolutive case is often used for a direct object, the subject of an intransitive verb, and for abstract nouns and nouns representing inanimate objects, regardless of whether they appear as subject or object.
The uses of the absolutive case are best understood in contrast with the uses of the causative case, which are easier to characterize.
The causative case is used to convey the immediate source of an action or process (the Aristotelian concept of efficient cause matches closely).
www.telp.com /ilt_nouns.htm   (767 words)

  
 Ergativity in Suleimaniye Kurdish
In the case of any one particular language, it may not always be obvious whether the grammar is ergative/absolutive or nominative/accusative; this is true partially because grammars which employ features of the ergative/absolutive system tend to employ a combination of both systems, rather than being purely ergative.
Case Endings: In an ergative/absolutive system, subjects and objects are marked with the same case (usually the unmarked, or absolutive, case), and agents are marked with a different case (the marked, or ergative, case) [ Dixon 1979:62, 64 ].
That is, in the case of subject and agent, a clitic is required to appear on the verb (and then move off, in the case of past transitive verbs) regardless of whether or not an explicit subject or agent noun phrase is present in the sentence.
www.home.earthlink.net /~rcfriend/ESK.htm   (7249 words)

  
 Declension : Noun case
The case doesn't depend on whether a verb is used in a transitive or intransitive form.
Prepositional/postpositional: Nouns are accompanied by words that mark case, but the noun itself isn't modified.
For an example of a language that uses a large number of cases, view the section on "Cases" in the Finnish language grammar article.
www.wordlookup.net /no/noun-case.html   (604 words)

  
 Declension - Article from FactBug.org - the fast Wikipedia mirror site
The patient of a (transitive) verb is in the accusative case.
This noun is in the trigger case, and information elsewhere in the sentence (for example a verb affix in Tagalog) specifies the role of the trigger.
The Status of Morphological Case in the Icelandic Lexicon by Eiríkur Rögnvaldsson.
www.factbug.org /cgi-bin/a.cgi?a=8645   (514 words)

  
 friday - conference program - the chicago linguistic society
I crucially show that structural case is available for the object in the former but not in the latter.
I additionally show how a popular alternative analysis of Tagalog syntax, which is based on a mechanism of “case agreement”, cannot account for the differences between the two constructions, in particular the distribution of structural case in the language.
This paper argues instead that structural objective case marks a subject-predicate dependency relation, where the dependency is expressed by a particular term of the predicate, the object.
humanities.uchicago.edu /orgs/cls/program_f.html   (1418 words)

  
 Ergative-absolutive language - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
The agent of a transitive verb (A) is marked with ergative case.
In Urdu and Hindi, ergative case is marked on agents in the perfective aspect for transitive and ditransitive verbs, while in other situations agents appear in the nominative case.
Certain Australian Aboriginal languages (e.g., Warlpiri) possess an intransitive case and an accusative case along with an ergative case, and lack an absolutive case; such languages are called ergative-accusative languages or tripartite languages.
en.wikipedia.org /wiki/Ergative-absolutive_language   (1410 words)

  
 Illative case information - Search.com   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-11-03)
Illative is, in the Finnish language, Estonian language and the Hungarian language, the third of the locative cases with the basic meaning of "into (the inside of)".
The illative case, denoting direction of movement, is used rarely in the modern standard Lithuanian, although it's used in common spoken language, especially in its certain dialects.
The illative case was used extensively in older Lithuanian; the first Lithuanian grammar by Daniel Klein, that mentions both illative and į+accusative, calls the usage of the illative "more elegant".
c10-ss-1-lb.cnet.com /reference/Illative_case   (364 words)

  
 Abstract: Edith Aldridge
I propose that absolutive Case in ergative languages is checked either by T or v, depending on the transitivity of the clause.
In transitive clauses, v hosts an uninterpretable absolutive Case feature which is checked with a VP-internal DP goal.
In intransitive clauses, like antipassives, the absolutive Case feature is located in T, which serves as the probe for the DP closest to it, the external argument in [Spec, v].
www.ling.hawaii.edu /afla/AbAldridge.htm   (458 words)

  
 Ergativity main page
I argue that ergative case is not equivalent to nominative nor to accusative case in that it is direct, inherent and assigned internally to vP to the external agent argument.
Abstract: This paper proposes a restrictive theory of ergativity, whereby ergative case is inherent (Woolford 1997), and absolutive case is eliminated in favour of nominative case and accusative case.
This structure, in turn, necessarily yields the assignment of absolutive case to the main clauses’s subject, regardless of the nature of the verb embedded in the adjunct clause.
www.chass.utoronto.ca /~ajohns/ergativity.html   (1437 words)

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