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Topic: Acropolis


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  The Acropolis of Athens
The Parthenon and other main buildings on the Acropolis were built by Pericles in the fifth century BC as a monument to the cultural and political achievements of the inhabitants of Athens.
Below the Acropolis is the theater of Herod Atticus built by the Romans in 161 AD and still used today for classical concerts, ballet, performances of high cultural value and Yanni.
The cost of entrance to the Acropolis is about 12 euros and is good for the other sites in the area including the ancient agora, theatre of Dionysos, Kerameikos, Roman Agora, Tower of the Winds and the Temple of Olympian Zeus and is supposedly good for a week.
www.athensguide.com /acropolis.html   (0 words)

  
  acropolis - Hutchinson encyclopedia article about acropolis   (Site not responding. Last check: )
The Acropolis of Athens contains the ruins of the Parthenon and surrounding complexes, built there during the days of the Athenian empire.
Other notable strongholds were the Acropolis of Corinth, called Acrocorinthus, that of Larisa at Argos, that of Mount Ithome at Messene, and that of Thebes, called Cadmea.
Seeing no road, we took a tall hill to the left of the distant Acropolis for a mark, and steered straight for it over all obstructions, and over a little rougher piece of country than exists any where else outside of the State of Nevada, perhaps.
encyclopedia.farlex.com /acropolis   (341 words)

  
 Acropolis, Athens - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
This "Persian debris" is the richest archaeological treasure excavated on the Acropolis, as its burial had protected it from further destruction through the ages.
At the center of the acropolis is the Parthenon or Temple of Athena Parthenos (Athena the Virgin).
Acropolis of Athens - AcropolisofAthens.gr - one monument, one heritage
en.wikipedia.org /wiki/Acropolis,_Athens   (1545 words)

  
 Acropolis - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
The word "Acropolis", though Greek in origin and associated primarily with Greek cities (Athens, Argos, Thebes, and Corinth with its Acrocorinth), may be applied generically to all such citadels (Rome, Jerusalem, Celtic Bratislava, many in Asia Minor, or even Castle Hill at Edinburgh).
The most famous example of the kind is the Acropolis of Athens, which, by reason of its historical associations and the famous buildings erected upon it, is generally known without qualification as simply "The Acropolis".
The term Acropolis is also used to described the central complex of overlapping structures, such as plazas and pyramids, in many Mayan cities, including Tikal and Copán.
en.wikipedia.org /wiki/Acropolis   (272 words)

  
 Acropolis - Free Encyclopedia Free Dictionary of Italian Culture - Encyclopedia Palamito, on line since 1993   (Site not responding. Last check: )
The term acropolis implies a crowded city to the feet and on the slopes of a hill or a mountain.
The name of acropolis is often used for specifically pointing out the acropolis in Athens, the rocky high ground to south of the city, steep on the slopes northern and oriental, steep toward that southern, but accessible from the western side.
Under Pericle, the acropolis was magnificently embellished with the construction of the Propileis, with the tempietto of Atena Nike and with the new Partenone, while the Eretteo was assistant shortly after.
www.palamito.it /engl/Acropoli.htm   (875 words)

  
 MSN Encarta - Acropolis
In many cases the acropolis became the site of temples and public buildings and thus served as the town’s religious center and the focal point of its public life and as a place of refuge.
It houses the remains of the Parthenon, a magnificent temple dedicated to the goddess Athena; the Propylaea, a monumental marble gateway and the main entrance to the Acropolis; the Erechtheum, a temple famous for the perfection of its details; and the Temple of Athena Nike.
The principal entrance to the Acropolis is a monumental gateway called the Propylaea, which is made of white marble.
encarta.msn.com /encyclopedia_761559276/Acropolis.html   (889 words)

  
 The Acropolis of Athens
You may notice at the entrance to the Acropolis and the paths leading up to it the licensed guides who for around 30 Euros or so, will give you a tour so that you may leave the area more informed then when you got here.
Several of her books are considered controversial by her fellow archaeologists because they seem to prove a link between Chinese and Ancient Greek culture that if correct could change much of what we believe about the past.
Theresa works as a guide on the Acropolis and a tour with her may have you questioning the past as well.
www.athensguide.com /athacrop.html   (0 words)

  
 Acropolis of Athens
Acropolis (akro + polis) literally means edge or point of the city, and throughout the centuries in has embodied a much more significant position not in relation to a city, but in relation to an entire civilization.
The temples of the Acropolis of Athens were destroyed or burned several times in ancient times, and the monuments as we see them today were the result of a terrific public project the Athenians undertook during "The Golden Age of Perikles" circa 450 BC.
In the monuments of the Acropolis the ideals which forged western thought and culture are embodied in artistic expression and formal stylization of the highest degree.
www.greeklandscapes.com /greece/acropolis.html   (985 words)

  
 The Acropolis
The rocky hill of the Acropolis ("topmost part of the city") rises to 156 meters in the middle of the Attica basin.
The monuments on the western slope of the Acropolis - the Propylaea, the marble pedestal of Agrippa and the small temple of Athena Nike - are visible.
The Acropolis, the hill of Philopappos, Piraeus and the Saronic Gulf as seen from Lycabettus Hill at dusk.
www.grisel.net /acropolis.htm   (1758 words)

  
 Athens City Guide - What you need to know about Athens !
Since then, the Acropolis became a fortress, and, because of that, it was greatly and continuously damaged till the Turkish surrender in 1833.
The Acropolis is chosen as the seat of the Archbishop of Athens.
Later on, during King Otto’s reign, the Parthenon, or rather the entire Acropolis, risked another kind of danger: According to a design, at the request of Prince Frederick William of Prussia, the king’s uncle, the construction of a palace on the Acropolis contemplated.
www.athensguide.gr /pop/acropolis.html   (4666 words)

  
 Map of the Acropolis of Athens
This sanctuary, built in a crack of the cliff on the northern side of the Acropolis, was dedicated to Aglaurus, one of the daughters of Cecrops, the first king of Athens (see Herodotus' Histories, VIII, 53).
The propyla of the Acropolis were built by Pericles as part of his plans to enhance the site and constituted the doorway to the flat top of the sacred rock.
This street leading from the agora to the theater of Dionysus by the eastern side of the Acropolis, owed its name to the fact that monuments and tripods erected in memory of their victories at the theater by wealthy citizens selected as choirmasters (chorègoi) were lining up on its sides.
www.plato-dialogues.org /tools/acropol.htm   (1105 words)

  
 Map of the Acropolis of Athens
This sanctuary, built in a crack of the cliff on the northern side of the Acropolis, was dedicated to Aglaurus, one of the daughters of Cecrops, the first king of Athens (see Herodotus' Histories, VIII, 53).
The propyla of the Acropolis were built by Pericles as part of his plans to enhance the site and constituted the doorway to the flat top of the sacred rock.
This street leading from the agora to the theater of Dionysus by the eastern side of the Acropolis, owed its name to the fact that monuments and tripods erected in memory of their victories at the theater by wealthy citizens selected as choirmasters (chorègoi) were lining up on its sides.
plato-dialogues.org /tools/acropol.htm   (1105 words)

  
 acropolis on Encyclopedia.com   (Site not responding. Last check: )
ACROPOLIS [acropolis] [Gr.,=high point of the city], elevated, fortified section of various ancient Greek cities.
The Acropolis of Athens, a hill c.260 ft (80 m) high, with a flat oval top c.500 ft (150 m) wide and 1,150 ft (350 m) long, was a ceremonial site beginning in the Neolithic Period and was walled before the 6th cent.
Although the Acropolis was laid waste by the Persians in 480 BC and was later further damaged by the Turks and others, remains of the Parthenon, Erechtheum, and Propylaea still stand.
encyclopedia.infonautics.com /html/a1/acropoli.asp   (731 words)

  
 Acropolis360 Panorama Tour
Acropolis Hill, also called the "Sacred Rock" of Athens, is the most important site of the city.
During Perikles' Golden Age, ancient Greek civilization was represented in an ideal way on the hill and some of the architectural masterpieces of the period were erected within its grounds.
During the navigation you will have the opportunity to listen to contemporary music and commentary on the monuments as well as click info hotspots where extra information about the Acropolis is revealed in the text boxes adjacent to the panorama images.
www.virtualbritain.org /acropolis_tour1_MS.html   (238 words)

  
 The Acropolis Museum   (Site not responding. Last check: )
Many of the unique works of art that ornamented the Acropolis have been stolen and transferred abroad.
In the 1950's it was extended towards the east and the exhibition was rearranged by the archaeologist I. Meliades.
Since the beginning of the excavations, the vases and the bronzes have been kept in the National Archaeological Museum of Athens, while the inscriptions are housed in the Epigraphical Museum.
www.culture.gr /2/21/211/21101m/e211am01.html   (508 words)

  
 Acropolis Museum is Back on Track
Acropolis Museum is back on track and wants the Parthenon Marbles to come home.
They suspect that some of the recent lawsuits were a result of local residents' desire to attract attention to the destruction, not of the archaeological site, but of their own houses, hoping to wrest more money from museum developers.
The new Acropolis Museum, a three-story glass structure mounted on pillars, is intended not only as an upgrade but also as an enticement.
www.archaeology.org /0407/newsbriefs/acropolis.html   (838 words)

  
 The Acropolis of Athens   (Site not responding. Last check: )
During Perikles' Golden Age, ancient Greek civilization was represented in an ideal way on the hill and some of the architectural masterpieces of the period were erected on its ground.
The monuments on the Acropolis reflect the successive phases of the city's history.
The monumental gateway of the Acropolis was designed by the architect Mnesikles and constructed in 437-432 B.C. It comprises a central building and two lateral wings.
www.culture.gr /2/21/211/21101a/e211aa01.html   (906 words)

  
 Climbing the Acropolis
The word "acropolis" means the highest city, and it is. We cross the street and start walking towards the great limestone plateau.
Finally we reach what appears to be an entrance gate to the Acropolis, so we follow a group of tourists along the stone drive that leads towards the base of the plateau.
Five of the originals are in the Acropolis museum, and the sixth was taken to England long ago by Lord Elgin.
www.gogreece.com /classroom/Acropolis.htm   (3181 words)

  
 The importance of the Elgin Marbles Parthenon Frieze and its symbolism
The symbolism of the Parthenon with the Athena statue on the Acropolis of Athens suggests that stories told by Plato were (1) common knowledge among the Athenian intelligensia (2) universally held to be true and (3) resulted in the building of the greatest temple ever built.
For the fact is that a single night of excessive rain washed away the earth and laid bare the rock; at the same time there were earthquakes, and then occurred the extraordinary inundation, which was the third before the great destruction of Deucalion.
Where the Acropolis now is there was a fountain, which was choked by the earthquake, and has left only the few small streams which still exist in the vicinity, but in those days the fountain gave an abundant supply of water for all and of suitable temperature in summer and in winter.
www.mistral.co.uk /hammerwood/elgin.htm   (5509 words)

  
 [No title]
This plaza was enclosed by terraces on the east and the south-side, forming some sort of theatral area, recalling on a modest scale the areas for public spectacles which have been found in Crete in connection with the palaces of Cnossos and Phaestos.
In the west this plaza was limited by the cultplace of Poseidon or Zeus, marked with the holes in the Acropolis rock.
Kawerau Drawings of the excavation of the Athenian Acropolis by Kawerau, republished in: J.A. Bundgaard, The excavation of the Acropolis (Copenhagen 1974).
www.xs4all.nl /~mkosian/hekat.html   (3471 words)

  
 Guardian Unlimited | Arts features | Acropolis Museum, Athens, Greece
The new Acropolis Museum was going to be a modern masterpiece, its glory a glass-walled room looking up at the Parthenon, the great temple to Athena.
If the story of the new Acropolis Museum is pathetic, that of Santiago Calatrava's Olympic stadium may soon be acknowledged as glorious.
Luckily, the curator of the Gallery Bernier/Eliades, in an old house near the Acropolis, is happy to show me her Gilbert and George exhibition.
www.guardian.co.uk /arts/features/story/0,11710,1274256,00.html   (1610 words)

  
 Acropolis Rally '96
Acropolis Rally with up to date result service and pictures.
As ever, the roads in Acropolis were very hard for the tires and punctures were common.
Puncture-proof tires which all the teams were using helped somewhat but they too are slower when punctured and sometimes the surface of the tire simply disintegrates and lets the mousse out of the tire so drivers had to change tires themselves on areas where additional service was not allowed.
www.worldrally.net /pakar/96/acropolis96.html   (592 words)

  
 Geology of Athens
The Acropolis hill is a block of Late Cretaceous limestone resting on the marls and sandstones of the Athens Schist rock series (figures 3.3, 3.4), which can be seen on the approach to the main entrance to the site, and just beneath the Propylea (References 9, 10, 264).
The top of the Acropolis hill has been leveled with artificial fill up to 14 m thick which is retained by the walls.
The sacred hill of the Acropolis was never defaced with quarries, but limestone for many of its buildings and the walls was quarried from several of the adjacent hills including the Hill of the Nymphs (References 57, 290).
wwwdsa.uqac.uquebec.ca /~mhiggins/athen.htm   (1585 words)

  
 Acropolis Tour
The acropolis was an important site as early as the Bronze Age, when it housed a Mycenaean citadel.
The rebuilding of the acropolis was urged by Pericles, to express the power and glory of Athens, the city that was teacher of the Greeks and head of the Delian League that continued the fight against barbarian Persia.
On the south slope of the acropolis lie the remains of the theater of Dionysus, where the plays of Aeschylus and Sophocles were performed.
campus.lakeforest.edu /academics/greece/AcropTour.html   (1750 words)

  
 Flickr: Search
We found 22,355 results for photos tagged with Acropolis.
Find and Compare prices on What Is An Acropolis at Smarter.com.
Download Acropolis Download Acropolis for Free Tons of fun and challenging games....
www.flickr.com /search/?q=Acropolis&m=tags&s=int   (0 words)

  
 50 Places @ nationalgeographic.com   (Site not responding. Last check: )
In 447 B.C. the Athenians began to erect the Parthenon—jewel of the Acropolis, a symbol of classical beauty and a supreme achievement of ancient Greek architecture.
The Acropolis, awesome and aloof on its limestone mesa above hectic modern Athens, is so integral to the texts of our history books—and the subtexts of our imaginations—that it is one of those near-mythic monuments you feel you’ve seen even if you never have.
This quick introduction to the Acropolis combines brief histories of the famous monuments with photographs, visiting hours, and ticket information.
www.nationalgeographic.com /traveler/acropolis.html   (270 words)

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