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Topic: Adessive case


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  Genitive case - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-11-07)
The genitive case (also called the second case) is a grammatical case that indicates a relationship, primarily one of possession, between the noun in the genitive case and another noun.
In the case of constellations, it is useful to know the genitive of the constellation's Latin name, since this is used to make the Bayer designation of stars in that constellation.
In Baltic-Finnic languages, the accusative case -(e)n is homophonic to the genitive case.
trickmy.net /cgi-bin/nph-proxy.pl/100010A/http/en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Genitive   (917 words)

  
 Ablative case - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-11-07)
The ablative case is a case found in e.g.
In Latin, the ablative case has absorbed the functions of the old instrumental case and the former locative case.
In the Finnish language (suomi), the ablative case is the sixth of the locative cases with the basic meaning "from off of" - a poor English equivalent, but necessary to distinguish it from "from out of" which would be Elative case.
www.encyclopedia-online.info /Ablative_case   (165 words)

  
 Vocative case - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-11-07)
The vocative case is the case used for a noun identifying the person (animal, object, etc.) being addressed and/or occasionally the determiners of that noun.
In Latin, e.g., the nominative case is lupus and the vocative case is lupe!
The vocative case in Romanian is inherited from Latin.
www.educhy.com /index.php/Vocative_case   (1281 words)

  
 Dative case - Biocrawler   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-11-07)
The dative case is a grammatical case generally used to indicate the noun to whom something is given.
The dative generally marks the indirect object of a verb, although in some instances, the dative is used for the direct object of a verb pertaining directly to an act of giving something.
The pronoun whom is also a remnant of the dative case in English, descending from the Old English dative pronoun "hwām" (as opposed to the nominative "who", which descends from Old English "hwā") — though "whom" also absorbed the functions of the Old English accusative pronoun "hwone".
www.biocrawler.com /encyclopedia/Dative_case   (739 words)

  
 Ablative case - Encyclopedia, History, Geography and Biography   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-11-07)
This is known as the ablative of means or of instrument, and is equivalent to the instrumental case found in some other languages.
In Finnish, the ablative case is the sixth of the locative cases with the meaning "from off of", e.g.
It is an outer locative case, used just as the adessive and allative cases to denote both being on top of something and "being around the place" (as opposed to the inner locative case, the elative, which means "from out of" or "from the inside of").
www.arikah.net /encyclopedia/Ablative_case   (527 words)

  
 Declension - Biocrawler   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-11-07)
The patient of a (transitive) verb is in the accusative case.
This noun is in the trigger case, and information elsewhere in the sentence (for example a verb affix in Tagalog) specifies the role of the trigger.
The trigger may be identified as the agent, patient, etc. Other nouns may be inflected for case, but the inflections are overloaded; for example, in Tagalog, the subject and object of a verb are both expressed in the genitive case when they are not in the trigger case.
www.biocrawler.com /encyclopedia/Declension   (573 words)

  
 Declension
Active: The agent of a verb is always in the subject case, and the patient is always in the object case.
The case does not depend on whether a verb is used in a transitive or intransitive form.
Positional: Nouns are not inflected for case; the position of a noun in the sentence expresses its case.
www.ebroadcast.com.au /lookup/encyclopedia/no/Noun_case.html   (367 words)

  
 Instrument Case   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-11-07)
In the Finnish language, the Allative case is the fifth of the locative cases, with the basic meaning of "onto".
In addition, it is the logical complement of the adessive case for referring to "being around the place".
This is especially the case within the object-oriented community where they originated, but their applicability is not restricted to object-oriented systems, because use cases are not object orientated in nature.
www.wwwtln.com /finance/100/instrument-case.html   (579 words)

  
 List of grammatical cases - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
This is a list of cases as they are used by various inflectional languages that have declension.
Note: Most cases used for location and motion can be used for time as well.
Czech, Polish, Russian, Slovak (note: this case is called lokál in Czech and in Slovak, and miejscownik in Polish)
en.wikipedia.org /wiki/List_of_grammatical_cases   (289 words)

  
 Adessive case - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-11-07)
In the Finnish language, Estonian language and Hungarian language the adessive case (from Latin adesse "to be present") is the fourth of the locative cases with the basic meaning of "on".
It is also used as an instrumental case in Finnish.
In addition, it can specify "being around the place", as in koululla (at the school including the schoolyard), as contrasted with the inessive koulussa (in the school, inside the building).
en.wikipedia.org /wiki/Adessive_case   (153 words)

  
 Pakistan encyclopedia : Cultural Information , Maps, Pakistan politics and officials, Pakistan History. Travel to ...
The dative case (also called the third case) is a grammatical case generally used to indicate the noun to whom something is given.
Here, the subject, Ich, is in the nominative case, the direct object, das Buch, is in the accusative case, and zum Verleger is in the dative case, since zu always requires the dative (zum is a contraction of zu + dem).
The dative/lative case usually occurs, as in the examples above, in combination with another suffix as poss-lative case; this should not be regarded as a seperate case, though, as many of the locative cases in Tsez are constructed analytically; hence, they are actually a combination of two case suffixes.
www.pakistaneworld.com /wiki-Dative_case   (1433 words)

  
 Commitative,Instr,Manner in Finnish
Besides instrument and manner, the adessive case is used for location, ëon top ofí or ënearí in the corresponding English phrases.
The adessive case is made by adding the suffix ë-llaí to the noun stems (Karlsson 105).
In Finnish, the partitive case expresses the "indefinite, non-limited quantity (Karlsson 72)," and used as an objects of the verbs expressing the emotions (Karlsson 80).
www.uiowa.edu /~linguist/classes/typology99/languages/Finnish/Commitative,Instr,Manner.html   (537 words)

  
 Estonian Inflection
The nominative case is used when the noun is the subject (or predicate) of the sentence.
The adessive case is used to show something else rests ontop of it.
The translative case is also used as a short form of the postposition 'jaoks' to show what something is for.
www.cusd.claremont.edu /~tkroll/inflection.html   (413 words)

  
 Locative case
The locative case is found in some classical Indo-European languages, particularly Sanskrit and Latin.
The locative case corresponds vaguely to the preposition "in", "at", or "by" of English and indicates a final location of action or a time of the action.
In languages such as Finnish, there is a set of six distinct locative cases that express different relationships to location.
www.teachersparadise.com /ency/en/wikipedia/l/lo/locative_case.html   (144 words)

  
 Middle East Open Encyclopedia: Nominative   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-11-07)
The nominative case (also called the first case) is a grammatical case for a noun, which generally marks the subject of a verb, as opposed to its object or other verb arguments.
The nominative case is the usual, natural form (more technically, the least marked) of certain parts of speech, such as nouns, adjectives, pronouns and less frequently numerals and participles, and sometimes does not indicate any special relationship with other parts of speech.
Therefore, in some languages the nominative case is unmarked, that is, the nominative word is the base form or stem, with no inflection; alternatively, it may said to be marked by a null morpheme.
www.baghdadmuseum.org /ref?title=Nominative   (440 words)

  
 Elative case: Facts and details from Encyclopedia Topic   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-11-07)
Adessive case In the finnish language, estonian language and hungarian language the adessive case is the fourth of the locative cases with the basic meaning of "on"....
Allative case In the finnish language, the allative case is the fifth of the locative cases, with the basic meaning of "onto"....
Abessive case In linguistics, the abessive case is a noun case expressing the lack and absence of something....
www.absoluteastronomy.com /e/elative_case   (556 words)

  
 Locative case - Free net encyclopedia   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-11-07)
The locative case belongs to the general local cases together with the lative and separative case.
In the Finnish grammar, the locative is included in the essive case.
In the Hungarian language, nine such cases exist, yet the name locative case refers to a form (-t/-tt) used only in a few city/town names along with the Inessive case or Superessive case.
www.netipedia.com /index.php/Locative_case   (308 words)

  
 Abessive case -   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-11-07)
) are names for a grammatical case expressing the lack or absence of the marked noun.
In Martuthunira, the privative case is formed with two suffixes, -wirriwa and -wirraa.
In the Finnish language, the abessive case is formed with the suffix -tta or -ttä according to vowel harmony.
psychcentral.com /psypsych/wiki/Abessive   (260 words)

  
 Telugu language - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-11-07)
In Telugu, Karta కర్త (nominative case or the doer), Karma కర్మ (object of the verb) and Kriya క్రియ (action or the verb) follow a sequence.
As is the case with most Indian languages, the vocabulary of what is referred to as 'pure' Telugu is almost exclusively based on Sanskrit.
Telugu pronouns follow the systems for gender and respect also found in other Indian languages.
trickmy.net /cgi-bin/nph-proxy.pl/100010A/http/en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Telugu_language   (1910 words)

  
 Adessive case: Facts and details from Encyclopedia Topic   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-11-07)
Inessive case Inessive case is a locative grammatical case....
Partitive case The partitive case is a grammatical case which denotes "partialness", "without result", or "without specific identity"....
Absolutive case In ergative-absolutive languages, the absolutive case is used to mark the subject of an intransitive verb or the object of a transitive verb....
www.absoluteastronomy.com /a/adessive_case   (491 words)

  
 English declension - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-11-07)
This collapse of the separate case pronouns into the same word is one of the reasons grammarians consider the dative and accusative cases to be extinct in English — neither is an ideal term for the role played by "whom".
The information formerly conveyed by having distinct case forms is now mostly provided by prepositions and word order.
Modern English morphologically distinguishes only one case, the possessive case — which some linguists argue is not a case at all, but a clitic (see the entry for genitive case for more information).
www.educhy.com /index.php/Declension_in_English   (471 words)

  
 Genitive case - QuickSeek Encyclopedia   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-11-07)
This convention can be defended in such cases of long words, but although "king of sparta" is easier to read, it is as clearly a single word as the following cases: Web site / website, tool bar / toolbar, etc. (in which, incidentally, modern usage is moving away from unnecessary segmentation).
These are sometimes not identified as the genitive case, and in many instances are not marked with the apostrophe, but these usages demonstrate use of nouns in the genitive case as adverbs in the Germanic language, indicating the time when the events described happen.
In the singular, a periphrastic form with of is used; this usage is somewhat archaic or poetic in contemporary English.
genitive.quickseek.com   (1091 words)

  
 Inessive case -   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-11-07)
This case carries the basic meaning of "in": for example, "in the house" is "talo·ssa" in Finnish, "maja·s" in Estonian, "etxea·n" in Basque, and "ház·ban" in Hungarian.
In Hungarian, the suffix "ban/ben" is most commonly used for inessive case, although many others, such as -on, -en, -ön and others are also used, especially with cities.
In the Finnish language, the inessive case is considered the first of the six locative cases, which correspond to locational prepositions in English.
psychcentral.com /psypsych/wiki/Inessive   (164 words)

  
 [No title]
Another special case are nouns where the last two consonants undergo regular weak-grade alternation: kukko - kukon, rutto - ruton, hyppy - hypyn, sampo - sammon, kunto - kunnon, sisältö - sisällön,.
Nouns used as functions need a case, of which by far the commonest is the genitive.
The subject case of verbs is by default nominative.
www.cs.chalmers.se /Cs/Research/Language-technology/GF/lib/resource-1.0/doc/gfdoc/ParadigmsFin.html   (1452 words)

  
 Dative case - QuickSeek Encyclopedia   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-11-07)
Note that the concept of an indirect object may be rendered by a prepositional phrase.
In this case, the noun or pronoun's case is determined by the preposition, NOT by its function in the sentence.
Here, the subject, Ich, is in the nominative case; the direct object, das Buch, is in the accusative case, and zum Kassierer is in the dative case, since zu always requires the dative.
dativecase.quickseek.com   (773 words)

  
 Vocative case - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-11-07)
The vocative case (also called the fifth case) is the case used for a noun identifying the person (animal, object, etc.) being addressed and/or occasionally the determiners of that noun.
Historically, the vocative case was an element of the Indo-European system of cases, and existed in Latin, Sanskrit, and Classical Greek.
In informal speech, the nominative is increasingly used in place of the vocative, but this is regarded as a bad style in any formal situation.
eatmoreblueberries.com /cgi-bin/nph-plsd.cgi/010100A/uggc/ra.jvxvcrqvn.bet/jvxv/Ibpngvir_pnfr   (1568 words)

  
 Wikinfo | Ablative case
In the Finnish language (Suomi), it is the sixth of the locative cases with the basic meaning "from off of" - a poor English equivalent, but necessary to distinguish it from "from out of" which would be Elative case.
Compare accusative case, nominative case, dative case, ergative case, genitive case, vocative case.
Images, some of which are used under the doctrine of Fair use or used with permission, may not be available.
www.wikinfo.org /wiki.php?title=Ablative_case   (230 words)

  
 Everything about Adessive Case   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-11-07)
Nouns may be suffixed with the markers for the aforementioned accusative case and partitive case, the genitive case, eight different locatives, and a few other cases.
It is still the case today that about 6% of Finnish nationals, the Finland-Swedes, have Swedish as their mother tongue.
In linguistics, the instrumental case indicates that a noun is the instrument or means by which the subject achieves or accomplishes an action.
1899.wa.wikimiki.org /en/Adessive_case   (13887 words)

  
 Ergative vs. absolutive case - Gurupedia
ergative-absolutive languages which inflect for case, to mark the
The absolutive case, in the same context, is used to mark
The ergative case is typically marked (most salient), while the absolutive case is unmarked.
www.gurupedia.com /e/er/ergative_case.htm   (43 words)

  
 Order in Finnish
Then, object takes the same form as subject, which is the nominative case, and there is no telling object from subject by looking at the forms.
In such cases, nouns at the beginning of the sentence are interpreted as subject, and those after the verb are as direct object.
English ëabout + NP,í for example, is expressed by the ellative case (Karlsson 101), ëinto or for (direction)í is by the illative case (Karlsson 103), and ëwith + NPí is by the comitative case (Karlsson 114).
www.uiowa.edu /~linguist/classes/typology99/languages/Finnish/Order.html   (1265 words)

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