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Topic: Adiabatic process


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  Adiabatic process - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
Another example is the adiabatic flame temperature, which is the temperature that would be achieved by a flame in the absence of heat loss to the surroundings.
Since temperature is thermodynamically conjugate to entropy, the isothermal process is conjugate to the adiabatic process for reversible transformations.
Adiabatic heating and cooling are processes that commonly occur due to a change in the pressure of a gas.
en.wikipedia.org /wiki/Adiabatic_process   (986 words)

  
 Cyclic process - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
A cyclic process is a thermodynamic process which begins from and finishes at the same thermostatic state.
Equation (1) makes a cyclic process similar to an isothermal process: even though the internal energy changes during the course of the cyclic process, when the cyclic process finishes the system's energy is the same as the energy it had when the process began.
The adiabatic processes are impermeable to heat: heat flows into the loop through the left pressurizing process and some of it flows back out through the right depressurizing process, and the heat which remains does the work.
en.wikipedia.org /wiki/Cyclic_process   (827 words)

  
 No Title   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-10-07)
Process 2: The compression stroke in which the air in the combustion chamber is compressed by the motion of the piston.
Process 5: The valve exhaust in which there is a drop in pressure and temperature caused by the quasistatic (reversible) ejection of heat due to the opening of the exhaust valve.
Process 5: The vent exhaust in which a drop in pressure and temperature is caused by the quasistatic ejection of heat due to the contact of the combustion gases with the surroundings.
www.ee.bilkent.edu.tr /~billur/courses/ge308project/project.html   (2612 words)

  
 Adiabatic process Info - Encyclopedia WikiWhat.com   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-10-07)
Adiabatic processes are processes in which no heat is gained or lost in the working fluid.
In quantum mechanics, an adiabatic change is a sufficiently slow change in the Hamiltonian which would result only in a change of eigenvalues, not eigenstates.
If, in such a process, there is a qualitative change in the properties of the ground state (for example the spin), the change is called a quantum phase transition.
www.wikiwhat.com /encyclopedia/a/ad/adiabatic_process.html   (808 words)

  
 Adiabatic lapse rate - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
The adiabatic lapse rate is the rate of temperature change that occurs in an atmosphere as a function of elevation, assuming that air behaves adiabatically (thermally insulated).
The dry adiabatic lapse rate (DALR) is the rate at which a rising parcel of unsaturated air, such as a thermal, will lose temperature.
They are used to determine if the parcel of rising air will rise high enough for its water to condense to form clouds, and, having formed clouds, whether the air will continue to rise and form bigger shower clouds, and whether these clouds will get even bigger and form cumulo-nimbus clouds (thunder clouds).
en.wikipedia.org /wiki/Absolute_stable_air   (992 words)

  
 Textbooks and references
Process 2: The compression strokein which the air in the combustion chamber is compressed by the motion of the piston.
Process 5: The valve exhaustin which there is a drop in pressure and temperature caused by the quasistatic (reversible) ejection of heat due to the opening of the exhaust valve.
Process 5: The vent exhaustin which a drop in pressure and temperature is caused by the quasistatic ejection of heat due to the contact of the combustion gases with the surroundings.
www.ee.bilkent.edu.tr /~eeweb/ge308/project.html   (2635 words)

  
 Adiabatic Processes
This is called adiabatic heating and cooling, and the term adiabatic implies a change in temperature of the parcel of air without gain or loss of heat from outside the air parcel.
Adiabatic processes are very important in the atmosphere, and adiabatic cooling of rising air is the dominant cause of cloud formation.
This is called the Saturated adiabatic lapse rate (or the wet adiabatic lapse rate, or the moist adiabatic lapse rate, depending on the textbook you are using).
daphne.palomar.edu /jthorngren/adiabatic_processes.htm   (1264 words)

  
 lec05
An adiabatic process is a process in which no energy is added to or taken away from the system (the "system" usually is a parcel of air).
A saturated adiabatic process (sometimes called a moist adiabatic process or pseudo adiabatic processes) is an adiabatic process in which the system becomes saturated and latent heat is released or absorbed by the water molecules, thus offsetting the dry adiabatic temperature changes.
The lower value of the moist adiabatic rate, compared to the dry adiabatic rate, is due to the release of latent heat during the condensation process.
www.borg.com /~glenn/umuc/170/lec05/lec05.htm   (1308 words)

  
 adiabatic cooling and clouds   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-10-07)
This is an instruction on the adiabatic cooling process and different types of clouds.
Adiabatic cooling deals with the cooling of parcels of air as they rise, or are forced up, through the atmosphere.
The best illustration of adiabatic cooling is as a parcel of air is being forced over a land formation, such as a mountain.
ellerbruch.nmu.edu /cs255/mboutell/cloudadiabatic.html   (219 words)

  
 Barometer Bob's Climate and Weather Glossary   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-10-07)
In meteorology the adiabatic process is often also taken to be a reversible process.
Vertical motions of air parcels in the atmosphere are approximately adiabatic.
The rate of adiabatic cooling or warming is 10ºC per 1000 m (5.5ºF per 1000 ft).
www.hurricanehollow.org /glossary.html   (7604 words)

  
 Adiabatic Processes
An adiabatic process is one in which no heat is gained or lost by the system.
This condition can be used to derive the expression for the work done during an adiabatic process.
is a factor in determining the speed of sound in a gas and other adiabatic processes as well as this application to heat engines.
hyperphysics.phy-astr.gsu.edu /hbase/thermo/adiab.html   (352 words)

  
 Heat Transfer & Thermodynamics engineering - Gas Cooling on Expansion
Admittedly the process is not entirely adiabatic, but it only takes a few seconds to release the pressure in the bottle and the plastic is not very conductive nor is it a large heat sink, it should be nearly adiabatic.
If the bottle were well insulated and the expansion quick enough, an adiabatic process could be safely assumed, not so for reversibility, thus it wouldn't be isentropic, and the thermophysical properties of the leaving gas would differ from those of the gas left behind in the bottle.
The J-T coef is for a constant enthalpy process.
www.eng-tips.com /viewthread.cfm?qid=78680   (6153 words)

  
 General Chemistry Online: Glossary: Energy and chemical change
Very fast processes can often be considered adiabatic with respect to heat exchange with the surroundings, because heat exchange is not instantaneous.
G is negative for all spontaneous processes and zero for processes at equilibrium
A spontaneous process occurs because of internal forces; no external forces are required to keep the process going, although external forces may be required to get the process started.
antoine.frostburg.edu /chem/senese/101/thermo/glossary.shtml   (1938 words)

  
 Adiabatic process -   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-10-07)
After using a bicycle pump to inflate a pneumatic tyre or soccer ball the barrel of the pump is found to have heated up as a result of adiabatic heating.
Image:Adiabatic.png The mathematical equation for an ideal fluid undergoing an adiabatic process is
The definition of an adiabatic process is that heat transfer to the system is zero, \delta Q=0 .
psychcentral.com /psypsych/Adiabatic_process   (1268 words)

  
 [No title]   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-10-07)
Ideal compression is actually an 'isentropic' process (a process at constant entropy), which happens to be a type of adiabatic process.
An adiabatic process is basically a concept for people who like studying thermodynamic processes.
Another adiabatic process is the throttling process, which occurs at constant entropy.
www.elitesoft.com /web/sci.hvac/itadiabt.html   (247 words)

  
 Stability & Cloud Development
An adiabatic process is one where no heat is exchanged between an air parcel and the surrounding air.
When we talk about an adiabatic process in the current context we are talking about a rising (or sinking) parcel of air that is not exchanging any heat with its surroundings.
Since the moist adiabatic rate must be less than the environmental lapse rate for stable conditions to exist, a moderate to small environmental lapse rate enhances stability in the atmosphere.
imnh.isu.edu /digitalatlas/clima/imaging/clddev.htm   (1673 words)

  
 Physics 125
Processes which involve the movement of heat are called thermodynamic processes.
The path of an adiabatic process on the P vs. V graph is shown, but it is not as straight-forward to predict it.
The utility of the isothermal and adiabatic processes arises from the fact (which we'll demonstrate below) that the change of entropy for the process is 0, that is, there is no change in the disorder of the system.
www.umich.edu /~amophys/125/tseven/tseven.html   (1534 words)

  
 Isothermal process: Facts and details from Encyclopedia Topic   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-10-07)
Temperature is the physical property of a system which underlies the common notions of "hot" and "cold"; the material with the higher temperature is said to be hotter....
An isentropic process (a combination of the greek word "iso" -same- and entropy) is one during which the entropy of working fluid remains constant....
The brayton cycle is a cyclic process generally associated with the gas turbine....
www.absoluteastronomy.com /encyclopedia/i/is/isothermal_process.htm   (879 words)

  
 [No title]   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-10-07)
Introduction In applied physics, an adiabatic process is defined as any process that is asymptotically isentropic (thermodynamically reversible), that is, whose total entropy generated tends towards zero in some appropriate limit (typically, of low speed and/or improved isolation of the system).
The existence of adiabatic processes is an everyday fact, exemplified by the ballistic motion of a projectile in a near-vacuum environment (e.g.
The degree of adiabaticity of any process can be defined as equal to its quality factor Q, in the sense used in electrical and mechanical engineering, i.e., the ratio between the amount of free energy involved in carrying out the process, and the amount of this energy that gets dissipated to heat.
www.cise.ufl.edu /research/revcomp/Frank-MLPD-03.doc   (2032 words)

  
 Modern Physics:Slow and Fast Expansions - Wikibooks, collection of open-content textbooks
Adiabatic Process are reversible as the entropy stays the same.
For an Ideal Gas the equation of a PV equation of an Adiabatic Process is
Isothermal Processes are a little different, the system must be connected to a heat bath so that heat can flow into or out of the system in order to keep the temperature constant.
en.wikibooks.org /wiki/Modern_Physics:Slow_and_Fast_Expansions   (194 words)

  
 AMS Glossary
—A moist-adiabatic process in which the air is maintained at saturation by the evaporation or condensation of water substance, the enthalpy of water vapor formed or removed being supplied by or to the air, respectively.
In contrast to a pseudoadiabatic expansion, the liquid water that condenses in an air parcel expanding through a reversible moist-adiabatic process is carried with the parcel, so that subsequent compression occurs with moist-adiabatic warming, leading to the original state.
The moist-adiabatic lapse rate for the reversible process is given by
amsglossary.allenpress.com /glossary/search?id=reversible-moist-adiabatic-proc1   (201 words)

  
 CHEM 331
This paper illustrates calculations of energy and entropy changes for adiabatic processes in a gas.
In an adiabatic process, no heat is gained or lost by the system.
Reversible, adiabatic compression of a van der Waals gas.
classweb.gmu.edu /sdavis/chem331/adiabatic.htm   (2360 words)

  
 ipedia.com: Adiabatic process Article   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-10-07)
An adiabatic process is a process in which no heat is gained or lost in the working fluid.
For example, there are no chemical processes taking place in the fluid and there is no heat transfer from the...
The definition of an adiabatic process is that heat transfer to the system is zero,.
www.ipedia.com /adiabatic_process.html   (890 words)

  
 Adiabatic (Gerald L. Hurst)
I think a concise definition of an adiabatic process is q=0, that >is, there is no net transfer of heat from the system in question and its >environment.
Within that expanding cloud and in the air shockwave there are no ideal gases yet the ideal gas law gives us a reasonably accurate model of the processes which is more than adequate to predict most of the practical information we need for the application of explosives.
If terms like "adiabatic" and "ideal" offend our academic and puritan sensibilities, we can always resort to the use of suitable limiting adverbs to advise the world that our map is merely a map and not the terrirory.
yarchive.net /explosives/adiabatic.html   (582 words)

  
 Energy conservation in adiabatic process?
But 1, says that in the adiabatic process, no heat is exchanged between the system and its surroundings.
From the definition of an adiabatic process, I really don't see why this isn't adiabatic, as wel as free expansion but anyway, let's look at this transient period of expansion into the whole volume.
The difference with a reversible process is that there, the particles are bouncing off the moving wall that's increasing the volume.
www.physicsforums.com /showthread.php?t=54129   (1281 words)

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