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Topic: Adjectival participle


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 Language Arts Curriculum Framework May 2001
Infinitive phrases (He gave his permission to paint the wall), prepositional phrases (I sat next to a boy with red hair), and participial phrases (His voice, cracked by fatigue, sounded eighty years old) can all be used as adjectival phrases.
For example, in ‘a glowing coal and a beaten dog’, glowing and beaten are participles
A verb form ending in —ing or —ed.A participle functions like a verb because it can take an object; a participle functions like an adjective because it can modify a noun or pronoun.
k12s.phast.umass.edu /~hharg/languageartsglossary.html   (3952 words)

  
 OLC II.26: The Present Participle
In the first sentence, the participle "drooping" is used simply (all by itself) to modify the noun "flowers," and as such it is placed in the typical adjectival position immediately before the noun it modifies.
The present active participle is formed from the present stem of the verb, to which the ending -ns is ended.
Present active participles have only one gender-termination in the nominative singular and decline like the adjective ingentes, ingentia with one BIG exception, namely the ablative singular ends in -e (like 3rd declension nouns).
www.jburroughs.org /classics/curriculum/olc2/26_tutorial.html   (567 words)

  
 varval.txt
Part of speech: sentence main clause noun clause adjectival clause circumstantial clause noun phrase adjectival phrase circumstantial phrase noun pronoun preposition adjective adverb particle particle+cc verb np + active participle adj.
lec.uchicago.edu /~lec/proj/meteor/variable/varval.txt   (40 words)

  
 1.3g - Verbals
The present or past participle, when we use them as verbals, are adjectival in function; they modify things - subjects or objects.
The present participle is an "ing" verb form; the past participle is an "ed" verb form.
It is a present participle which works as a noun (either in a subject or an object position).
www.ucalgary.ca /UofC/eduweb/grammar/course/speech/1_3g.htm   (40 words)

  
 Report Submitted to FAMSI - David Bolles
Unlike the adjectives derived by appending the previous suffixes, it seems that the adjectival participle resulting from the use of this suffix cannot be used directly tied to the noun it is modifying, but rather is used as part of a modifying participial phrase.
As noted in Sections 56 and 91, this is a passive participle.
-Vcnac / -lac: Adjectives can be formed by appending the suffixes -Vcnac / -lac to the verb root to form what would be considered a participle in English.
www.famsi.org /reports/96072/grammar/section17.htm   (40 words)

  
 Ilkorin
To explain the ending - ian we must probably assume a primitive verb * thurjâ - with a verbal ending that is very well attested (yielding Quenya - ya); to this verb the primitive adjectival/past participle ending - nâ has been added to produce * thurjânâ > Ilkorin thurian.
Mentioned in the Etymologies in the entry for the stem KOR "round" (LR:365); the element - gorn can readily be matched with the primitive adjective kornâ there listed (concerning the adjectival ending - nâ, see arn, caun).
This synonym of dem (from dimbâ) must come from another adjectival form, with an ending that does not cause umlaut - say, * dimbi.
www.uib.no /people/hnohf/ilkorin.htm   (40 words)

  
 Chapter 5
The book regards all participles to be adjectival, but this assumption is not correct.
In our model, the modifiers in (2) and (4) would have to be identified as adjectival but those in (1) and (3) would not because there is no ambiguity involved.
Gerunds are most often confused with the present participle used as a modifier.
www.csus.edu /indiv/t/tanakar/Eng110J/chapter_5.htm   (5016 words)

  
 Greek Article & others
Of course, the participle can also often be substantival or adjectival without the article, though there is the greater possibility of ambiguity in such instances.
The presence of the article indicates a substatival (or adjectival) function for the participle.
The article itself does not involve possession, but this notion can be inferred from the presence of the article alone in certain contexts.
www.bcbsr.com /greek/gsubs.html   (5016 words)

  
 embick.html
There is no Lexicon in this theory, so that all derivations have to be syntactic; the distinction between participle types cannot be a result of a distinction in module between syntactic and lexical derivation.
A distinction often associated with Wasow (1977) holds that there are two different types of passive, and thus two types of passive participle.
The second type, often called Adjectival Passive, was held to be the result of Lexical rules.
www.ling.umd.edu /Events/Colloquia/archives/abstracts/embick.html   (285 words)

  
 DE Guidebook 2004-2005 German 12
Grammatical points; Indirect speech (Konjunctive I and II), present participle used as an adjective, past participle used as an adjective-revision points; Time-24 hr.
Grammatical points; Accusative of time: ede Stunde, alle zwei Stunden-revision points; Imperative, prepositions with the accusative and the dative, use of the Imperfekt, adjectival endings
Grammatical ponts; Construction with the dative: helfen, gefallen, passen, stehen, imperfect of
www.openschool.bc.ca /de/guidebook/courses/german12.html   (439 words)

  
 varval.txt
Part of speech: sentence main clause noun clause adjectival clause circumstantial clause noun phrase adjectival phrase circumstantial phrase noun pronoun preposition adjective adverb particle particle+cc verb np + active participle adj.
lec.uchicago.edu /~lec/proj/meteor/variable/varval.txt   (439 words)

  
 varval.txt
Part of speech: sentence main clause noun clause adjectival clause circumstantial clause noun phrase adjectival phrase circumstantial phrase noun pronoun preposition adjective adverb particle particle+cc verb np + active participle adj.
lec.uchicago.edu /~lec/proj/meteor/variable/varval.txt   (439 words)

  
 varval.txt
Part of speech: sentence main clause noun clause adjectival clause circumstantial clause noun phrase adjectival phrase circumstantial phrase noun pronoun preposition adjective adverb particle particle+cc verb np + active participle adj.
lec.uchicago.edu /~lec/proj/meteor/variable/varval.txt   (40 words)

  
 varval.txt
Part of speech: sentence main clause noun clause adjectival clause circumstantial clause noun phrase adjectival phrase circumstantial phrase noun pronoun preposition adjective adverb particle particle+cc verb np + active participle adj.
lec.uchicago.edu /~lec/proj/meteor/variable/varval.txt   (40 words)

  
 Gerunds and the progressive tenses in Spanish
The gerund is a verb form which has an adverbial function,not an adjectival function like a participle, nor a noun function like an infinitive.
The gerund is primarily used: with estar to form the progressive tenses; with verbs of motion and seguir / continuar ; to introduce an adverbial phrase or express “by (do)-ing (something)”.
Do not overuse the progressive tenses, since they are used far less frequently in Spanish than in English, and do not use them unless you are portraying an action as truly being in progress.
users.ipfw.edu /jehle/COURSES/GERUND.HTM   (40 words)

  
 SWEDEN.SE - Swedish Language
Swedish distinguishes between the verbal supine, as in “jag har skrivit brevet” (I have written the letter), and the adjectival past participle, as in “brevet är illa skrivet” (the letter is badly written).
Swedish is spoken in the Åland Islands, in coastal districts of southern Finland, and farther north along the coast of the Gulf of Bothnia around towns like Vaasa in ×sterbotten.
The government commissioned the Swedish Language Council to examine the state of Swedish, and the Council concluded that the Swedish language needs to be safeguarded by means of legislation making clear that Swedish is the principal language of Sweden and also its official language in international affairs.
www.sweden.se /templates/FactSheet____10083.asp   (40 words)

  
 Tuareg languages - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
No simple adjectives exist in the Tuareg languages; adjectival concepts are expressed using a relative verb form traditionally called 'participle'.
The Tuareg languages have very heavily influenced Northern Songhay languages such as Tasawaq, whose speakers are culturally Tuareg but speak Songhay varieties; this influence includes points of phonology and sometimes grammar as well as extensive loanwords.
They are traditionally written in the indigenous Tifinagh alphabet; however, the Arabic alphabet is commonly used in some areas (and has been since medieval times), while the Latin alphabet is official in Mali and Niger.
en.wikipedia.org /wiki/Tuareg_languages   (765 words)

  
 Previous Words of the Week.
The word is derived directly from the Latin eruditus, an adjective meaning well-instructed or learned, the past perfect participle of erudire (to teach or instruct), in turn derived from the deprivative prefix e- (out of, away from) + the adjective rudis (rude, unpolished).
The Greeks coined the word by appending the adjectival ending "-ikos" and the substantive ending "-ismos" to the name of a city, Solo(i)" in Cilicia where a corrupted version of the Attic dialect was regularly spoken by Athenian colonists-- at least, according to Strabo and a number of other contemporary writers.
The word's origins are traced by all three sources to the French esclater, the verb defined as "to burst forth", giving the French substantive esclat, defined as "splinter or fragment".
hometown.aol.com /oddother/page6.htm   (3995 words)

  
 Don Martin - Mark J. Ward Covering Discussion
Mark has separated and isolated the adjectival participle
Mark still refuses to accept and acknowledge that "every woman" is "every
Mark has the burden of taking the prophetess
www.religiousinstructor.com /mar03/dm13.html   (3995 words)

  
 Collected Precedents of the S.C.A.: Branch / Group Names
[Sunderoak, Canton of] Submitted as Sundered Oak, the use of the adjectival past participle in placenames has not been documented as a period pattern or practice.
Submitting it for the name of the canton raises the question of how we treat period forms of real-world names of SCA branches.
Nevertheless...the use of an administratively inappropriate standard designator in the descriptive part of a branch name is potentially confusing and urge the group to consider this issue before resubmitting their name.
www.sca.org /heraldry/laurel/precedents/CompiledNamePrecedents/BranchGroupNames.html   (3995 words)

  
 2 John 1 notes
For some of these mss it could be an intentional omission, for the sense of the passage is largely the same without the prepositional phrase (the following adjectival participle, in this case, would simply attach itself to the previous
However, it looks to be a simple case of homoioteleuton, for v.
www.biblefacts.org /bible/netbible/2jo1_notes.htm   (3995 words)

  
 Tuareg languages - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
No simple adjectives exist in the Tuareg languages; adjectival concepts are expressed using a relative verb form traditionally called 'participle'.
The Tuareg languages have very heavily influenced Northern Songhay languages such as Tasawaq, whose speakers are culturally Tuareg but speak Songhay varieties; this influence includes points of phonology and sometimes grammar as well as extensive loanwords.
Tamahaq- Language of the Kel Ahaggar, spoken in Algeria and in the north of Niger by approximately 57 000 people.
en.wikipedia.org /wiki/Tamasheq_languages   (765 words)

  
 Lante Artanro
*_cenna_ seen < _ken-_ see, behold (MC:222) + _-na_ passivve paticiple/adjectival ending (cf.
There is probably no passive tense in Quenya, but it is formed as in English with passive participle + the copula (in Quenya often absent), cf.
The word order is reversed here, but it doesent change the meaning.
www.geocities.com /petristikka/elvish/lante.html   (765 words)

  
 Greek infinitive & participle
This is the independent use of the adjectival participle (i.e., not related to a noun).
Structurally, the genitive absolute consists of the following: (1) A noun or pronoun in the genitive case (though this is sometimes absent); (2) a genitive anarthrous participle (always); (3) the entire construction at the front of a sentence (usually).
The first four categories are dependent verbal participles, example seven is independent verbal participle, and the genitive absolute is the last example.
www.bcbsr.com /greek/gvbls.html   (1765 words)

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