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Topic: Advanced Encryption Standard


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In the News (Sat 20 Apr 19)

  
 [No title]
The standard provided that it be reviewed within five (5) years to assess its adequacy.
A data encryption standard developed by IBM under the auspices of the United States Government.
It was criticized because the research that went into the development of the standard remained classified.
www.lycos.com /info/advanced-encryption-standard.html   (554 words)

  
  Advanced Encryption Standard - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
In cryptography, the Advanced Encryption Standard (AES), also known as Rijndael, is a block cipher adopted as an encryption standard by the US government.
It is expected to be used worldwide and analysed extensively, as was the case with its predecessor, the Data Encryption Standard (DES).
As a new encryption standard, it is currently being deployed on a large scale.
en.wikipedia.org /wiki/Advanced_Encryption_Standard   (1772 words)

  
 SeaSolve - Advanced Encryption Standard : Overview   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-10-18)
Encryption converts data to an unintelligible form called cipher text, decrypting the cipher text converts the data back into its original form, called plain text.
National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST), the main standards body in the US has selected Rijndael algorithm to be the final choice for AES (Advanced Encryption Standard).
This is to be a new encryption standard to replace the existing Data Encryption Standard (DES), which had been in place for more than two decades.
www.seasolve.com /products/AES/index.html   (223 words)

  
 Advanced Encryption Standard - Wikipedia
The Advanced Encryption Standard (AES) is a new encryption scheme for the United States government, replacing the aging Data Encryption Standard.
It is adopted as a FIPS standard, FIPS PUB 197.
On January 2, 1997 the National Institute of Standards and Technology called for cryptographers to propose a new standard block cipher for United States government use in non-classified but sensitive applications.
nostalgia.wikipedia.org /wiki/AES   (464 words)

  
 AES - Advanced Encryption Standard
The Advanced Encryption Standard (AES) will be a new Federal Information Processing Standard (FIPS) Publication that will specify a cryptographic algorithm for use by U.S. Government organizations to protect sensitive (unclassified) information.
Advanced Encryption Standard (AES) will become a federal standard for the encryption of commercial and government data, and is intended to replace DES.
Advanced Encryption Standard - a new cryptographic algorithm, previously known as Rijndael, intended as a replacement for 3DES.
www.auditmypc.com /acronym/AES.asp   (633 words)

  
 advanced encryption standard, The Cryptologia - Find Articles
The most widely used encryption scheme is based on the Data Encryption Standard (DES) adopted in 1977 by the National Bureau of Standards, now the National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST), as Federal Information Processing Standard 46 (FIPS PUB 46).
The input to the encryption and decryption algorithms is a single 128-bit block.
So, for example, the first four bytes of a 128-bit plaintext input to the encryption cipher occupy the first column of the in matrix, the second four bytes occupy the second column, and so on.
www.findarticles.com /p/articles/mi_qa3926/is_200207/ai_n9095229   (944 words)

  
 RFC 3826 (rfc3826) - The Advanced Encryption Standard (AES) Cipher Algorit
RFC 3826 (rfc3826) - The Advanced Encryption Standard (AES) Cipher Algorit
The AES (Advanced Encryption Standard) is the symmetric cipher algorithm that the NIST (National Institute of Standards and Technology) has selected in a four-year competitive process as Replacement for DES (Data Encryption Standard).
AES Encryption Key and IV The first 128 bits of the localized key Kul are used as the AES encryption key.
www.faqs.org /rfcs/rfc3826.html   (3202 words)

  
 FIRST ADVANCED ENCRYPTION STANDARD (AES) CANDIDATE CONFERENCE
E2 ("Efficient Encryption") is a Feistel network with twelve rounds, preceded by an initial transformation and followed by a final transformation.
Decryption is not identical to encryption, although it is similar in structure.
RC6^TM is a parameterized family of encryption ciphers that use a modified Feistel structure; under the parameters given for the AES submission, there are twenty rounds.
www.ieee-security.org /Cipher/ConfReports/conf-rep-aes.html   (5942 words)

  
 AES: Questions and Answers
It is a comprehensive report that discusses various issues related to the AES, presents analysis and comments received during the public comment period, summarizes characteristics of the five finalist AES algorithms, compares and contrasts the finalists, and presents NIST's selection of Rijndael.
Maintenance activities for the standard will be developed at the appropriate time, in full consideration of the situation's particular circumstances.
However, NIST's Data Encryption Standard (DES) was a U.S. Government standard for approximately twenty years before it became practical to mount a key exhaustion attack with specialized hardware.
www.nist.gov /public_affairs/releases/aesq&a.htm   (1639 words)

  
 Advanced Encryption Standard (AES)   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-10-18)
On January 2, 1997 National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST) issued a request for cryptographic algorithm, which was to become AES.
When CBC mode is used for encryption, the first plaintext block is XORed with pseudo-random block IV.
The actual implementation is a factor when comparing the speed of the two standards.
www.ratchkov.com /vpn/aes/aes.html   (1470 words)

  
 Encryption and security: the Advanced Encryption Standard - 10/31/2002 - EDN
The Advanced Encryption Standard is gaining steam as a stronger alternative to the Data Encryption Standard.
In recent years, the DES (Data Encryption Standard) has become vulnerable to attack by the raw computing horsepower that even a garage hobbyist possesses.
The NIST (National Institute of Standards and Technology) realizes that DES may no longer be appropriate for some high-security applications.
www.edn.com /article/CA253789.html   (2039 words)

  
 Advanced Encryption Standard - crypto for the next century
It is the selection of the Advanced Encryption Standard, a successor to the venerable Data Encryption Standard encryption algorithm, which was developed by IBM in the 1970s.
This will likely give AES the critical mass it needs to be the encryption technology integrated into computers large and small to secure e-commerce and financial transactions, as well as protecting the privacy of individual communications.
While it may seem odd that the algorithm of the future needs to run on the hardware of the past, the vision is that this encryption needs to work on nontraditional devices, such as smart cards, where the resources are still predicted to be modest for a while.
www.networkworld.com /newsletters/sec/0927sec1.html   (1053 words)

  
 M5410 Advanced Encryption Standard
The requirements included the ability to allow key sizes of 128, 192 and 256 bits; the algorithm should work on blocks of 128 bits; and it should be highly portable, working on a variety of hardware platforms including 8-bit processors used in smart cards and 32-bit processors used in most personal computers.
Eventually Rijndael was selected to be the AES and the official announcement that it was the new standard was made on Dec. 4, 2001 (to be effective March 26, 2002).
Thus we have the decryption algorithm written in the same form as the encryption algorithm, only replacing the steps by their inverses.
www-math.cudenver.edu /~wcherowi/courses/m5410/ctcaes.html   (1205 words)

  
 What is Advanced Encryption Standard? - a definition from Whatis.com - see also: AES, FIPS PUB 197
The Advanced Encryption Standard (AES) is an encryption algorithm for securing sensitive but unclassified material by U.S. Government agencies and, as a likely consequence, may eventually become the de facto encryption standard for commercial transactions in the private sector.
In January of 1997, a process was initiated by the National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST), a unit of the U.S. Commerce Department, to find a more robust replacement for the Data Encryption Standard (DES) and to a lesser degree Triple DES.
The specification called for a symmetric algorithm (same key for encryption and decryption) using block encryption (see block cipher) of 128 bits in size, supporting key sizes of 128, 192 and 256 bits, as a minimum.
searchsecurity.techtarget.com /sDefinition/0,,sid14_gci344759,00.html   (591 words)

  
 AES - the Advanced Encryption Standard
The Advanced Encryption Standard is the new information protection standard defined by the US to protect certain levels of Federal information and communications.
On January 2, 1997, the US National Institute for Security Technologies (NIST) announced that it was develop an new Advanced Encryption Standard to replace the previous Data Encryption Standard (DES).
RC6 is a parameterised family of encryption ciphers that essentially use the Feistel structure; 20 rounds were specified for the AES submission.
www.cescomm.co.nz /about/aes.html   (1365 words)

  
 Advanced Encryption Standard (AES)
The Advanced Encryption Standard (AES) is a computer security standard that became effective on May 26, 2002 by NIST to replace DES.
The algorithm consists of four stages that make up a round which is iterated 10 times for a 128-bit length key, 12 times for a 192-bit key, and 14 times for a 256-bit key.
The encryption requires 774 cycles per block on a MIPS32 processor and the decryption requires 837 cycles.
www.vocal.com /AES.html   (644 words)

  
 [No title]
The Advanced Encryption Standard (AES) is a National Institute of Standards and Technology specification for the encryption of electronic data.
DES was approved as a Federal standard in 1977 and remained viable until 1998 when a combination of advances in hardware, software, and cryptanalysis theory allowed a DES-encrypted message to be decrypted in 56 hours.
The number of rounds that the encryption algorithm uses is either 10, 12, or 14 and depends on whether the seed key size is 128, 192, or 256 bits.
msdn.microsoft.com /msdnmag/issues/03/11/AES/default.aspx   (6058 words)

  
 Security Reference Guide > Advanced Encryption Standard (AES)
Advanced Encryption Standard (AES) is a newer encryption method that was selected by the U.S. government to become the replacement for DES as their standard.
The contest was devised as a result of the cracking of the previous standard encryption method (DES), which was broken in 1990, and immediate replacement of the encryption was a necessity.
The key size directly reflects the strength of the encryption, as well as the amount of processing required to encrypt and decipher the text.
www.informit.com /guides/content.asp?g=security&seqNum=76&rl=1   (577 words)

  
 Advanced Encryption Standard (AES)   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-10-18)
The Advanced Encryption Standard (AES) is a computer security standard that became effective on May 26, 2002 by NIST to replace DES.
The algorithm consists of four stages that make up a round which is iterated 10 times for a 128-bit length key, 12 times for a 192-bit key, and 14 times for a 256-bit key.
The encryption requires 774 cycles per block on a MIPS32 processor and the decryption requires 837 cycles.
www.vocal.cc /AES.html   (870 words)

  
 U.S. approves stronger encryption standard | CNET News.com
The Commerce Department approves the Advanced Encryption Standard, a new, stronger data-encryption standard intended to replace an aging standard first adopted in 1977.
The Advanced Encryption Standard (AES) is intended to protect both personal and financial data for government and commercial use.
The standard incorporates the Rijndael (pronounced "rhine doll" or "rain doll") encryption formula, developed by Belgian cryptographers Joan Daemen and Vincent Rijmen, who are not requiring royalties for the use of their work.
news.com.com /2100-1017-276619.html   (357 words)

  
 [No title]
Advanced Encryption Standard (AES) is the other encryption alternative the 802.11 task group is writing into the 802.11i specification.
AES is the type of encryption used in many government agencies and security-conscious industries.
The Data Encryption Standard (DES) was initially issued for government use in 1977.
www.lycos.com /info/advanced-encryption-standard--algorithms.html   (381 words)

  
 Hardware performance of the Advanced Encryption Standard   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-10-18)
An existing American encryption standard, DES, has been shown to be insecure for today’s application including electronic funds transfer and electronic commerce.
As a result, in 1997, an effort was initiated to develop a new encryption standard to be commonly used to protect communication over all kinds of computer networks well into the next century.
The goal of this project was to perform an objective analysis of five candidates to the Advanced Encryption Standard, qualified to the Second Round of the NIST evaluation process, in terms of the efficiency of their hardware implementations.
bass.gmu.edu /crypto/research/aes.htm   (388 words)

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