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Topic: Aesop


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In the News (Wed 21 Aug 19)

  
  Frontline Placement Technologies : education
Aesop, the flagship service from Frontline Placement Technologies, has revolutionized the way school districts handle the daily challenge of filling vacant classrooms.
Aesop allows employees to report absences 24/7 via both a toll-free telephone number and the web.
Aesop has grown to serve over 950 school districts – more than any other vendor offering similar services – across the United States, Canada, Australia, and the United Kingdom, and currently there are over 700,000 active users every day.
www.aesoponline.com   (401 words)

  
  Aesop - Biography and Works
It is said that Aesop escaped punishment for his irreverence and tomfoolery many times by his ability to stand up to his accusers with a clever turn of phrase, pointing out their ironies and hypocrisy.
Although it is widely disputed, the death of Aesop is sometimes attributed to his stealing a gold or silver cup, his sentence for the crime to be thrown from a cliff in Delphi.
Aesop's Fables have been told and re-told, then written and re-written countless times as a form of entertainment and education.
www.online-literature.com /aesop   (656 words)

  
  Aesop - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
Aesop, as depicted in the Nuremberg Chronicle by Hartmann Schedel.
According to the historian Herodotus, Aesop met with a violent death at the hands of the inhabitants of Delphi, though the cause was not stated.
Aesop's deformity was further disputed by the Athenians, who erected in his honour a noble statue by the sculptor Lysippus.
en.wikipedia.org /wiki/Aesop   (938 words)

  
 Bookyards.com » Authors
Aesop, as depicted in the Nuremberg Chronicle by Hartmann Schedel.
Aesop (from the Greek Αἴσωπος — Aisopos), famous for his fables, was a slave who lived between 620 and 560 BC in Ancient Greece.
Aesop's fables and the Panchatantra share about a dozen tales, leading to discussions whether the Greeks learned these fables from Indian storytellers or the other way, or if the influences were mutual.
www.bookyards.com /biography.html?author_id=490&author_name=Aesop's   (1157 words)

  
 [No title]
Aesop Rock (born Ian Bavitz) is an avant-garde hip hop musician (rapper and producer) whose albums have been critically acclaimed for their originality and depth.
Aesop's style blends a varying tone and delivery with subject matter that focuses on intricate sequences of widely varying imagery, metaphors and pop culture references, while including the occasional touchstones of traditional hip hop storytelling and self-promotion.
In it, Aesop Rock begs that he wants to donate "his brain to the monstrous Panasonic profit," as he sits in front of the television "that will be his mother when she's gone" until his "little eyes glaze." Aesop Rock is not predictable in his lyrics, nor is he with the music.
www.lycos.com /info/aesop--aesop-rock.html   (636 words)

  
 Who was Aesop?
Aesop was a Greek folk hero who is supposed to have lived in the 6th century BC.
According to one tradition, Aesop lived for a while as a slave on the island of Samos, after being freed he traveled widely, then was murdered while visiting Delphi.
Aesop's fables later served as an inspiration for the writings of Jean de La Fontaine, a 17th-century French writer.
www.kyrene.org /schools/brisas/sunda/fab_fables/aesop.htm   (206 words)

  
 Aesop   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-11-07)
Aesop was born in the year 620 BC in Greece.
Aesop became an employee of the monarch Croesus in Sardis.
Croesus sent Aesop to Delphi with a large sum of gold to distribute among the citizen.
www.mce.k12tn.net /reading40/aesop.htm   (186 words)

  
 Aesop's Fables - Preface   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-11-07)
The rhetoricians and philosophers were accustomed to give the Fables of Aesop as an exercise to their scholars, not only inviting them to discuss the moral of the tale, but also to practice and to perfect themselves thereby in style and rules of grammar, by making for themselves new and various versions of the fables.
The eventual re-introduction, however, of these Fables of Aesop to their high place in the general literature of Christendom, is to be looked for in the West rather than in the East.
The greatest advance, however, towards a re-introduction of the Fables of Aesop to a place in the literature of the world, was made in the early part of the seventeenth century.
www.worldwideschool.org /library/books/socl/customsetiquettefolklore/AesopsFables/chap0.html   (3098 words)

  
 Aesop
Aesop must have received his freedom from Iadmon, or he could not have conducted the public defense of a certain Samian demagogue (Aristotle, Rhetoric, II 20).
We are further told that the Athenians erected in his honor a noble statue by the famous sculptor Lysippus, which furnishes a strong argument against the fiction of his deformity.
It is probable that Aesop did not commit his fables to writing; Aristophanes (Wasps, 1259) represents Philocleon as having learned the "absurdities" of Aesop from conversation at banquets, and Socrates whiles away his time in prison by turning some of Aesop's fables "which he knew" into verse (Plato, Phaedo, 61 b).
www.nndb.com /people/844/000087583   (659 words)

  
 Bestiaria Latina
Thanks to Project Gutenberg, there are three public domain English translations of Aesop available with illustrations: Aesop's fables illustrated by John Tenniel among others in 1884, a translation by Vernon Jones illustratrated by Arthur Rackham in 1912, and a version of Aesop for children with illustrations by Milo Winters in 1919.
There are many collections of Aesop's fables in verse dating to the Middle Ages, such as the Romulus: Fabulae Metricae in dacylic hexameters and the fables of Walter of England (also known as the "Anonymous Nevelet") which are written in elegiac coupets, along with the Romulus: Fabulae Rhythmicae, which is written in Goliardic stanzas.
Finally, the Latin Aesop of Steinhowel because the basis for the modern printed editions of Aesop throughout Europe.
www.mythfolklore.net /aesopica   (747 words)

  
 AESOP and LEE: Balloon Payloads
The AESOP (Anti-Electron Sub Orbital Payload) instrument, which was recently built at Bartol, is designed to have a similar energy response to LEE, but in addition it resolves positrons and negatrons with a maximum detectable rigidity of 6GV.
The AESOP and LEE instruments have flown together as a single balloon payload on 1-Sep-1997, 29-Aug-1998, 16-Aug-1999, 25-Aug-2000  and 13-Aug-2002 from Lynn Lake, Manitoba logging roughly 150hrs at float altitudes.
The primary goal of the AESOP instrument is to investigate the charge-sign dependence in solar modulation.
www.bartol.udel.edu /~clem/aesoplee.html   (1290 words)

  
 Literature.org - The Online Literature Library
Sardis, the capital of Lydia; Samos, a Greek island; Mesembria, an ancient colony in Thrace; and Cotiaeum, the chief city of a province of Phrygia, contend for the distinction of being the birthplace of Aesop.
The citizens of Delphi were visited with a series of calamities, until they made a public reparation of their crime; and, "The blood of Aesop" became a well- known adage, bearing witness to the truth that deeds of wrong would not pass unpunished.
It remains to state, that prior to this publication of M. Mezeriac, the life of Aesop was from the pen of Maximus Planudes, a monk of Constantinople, who was sent on an embassy to Venice by the Byzantine Emperor Andronicus the elder, and who wrote in the early part of the fourteenth century.
www.literature.org /authors/aesop/fables/biography.html   (789 words)

  
 Aesop Fables - The Complete works of Aesop
Aesop, probably one of the most famous fabulist storytellers of all time.
He may be as much of a fable as his stories, but, as it goes, Aesop was a slave in ancient Greece, born 600 B.C. His tales were told to his master, his Master's friends, and quickly he became known for his quick wit and fables.
Aesop is a timeless storyteller cause of the mix of amusing stories that have a lesson to be learned.
www.webterrace.com /aesop   (214 words)

  
 Aesop Biography (Writer) — FactMonster.com   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-11-07)
Aesop is famous for his fables: short tales which illustrated truths about life and human nature.
Those who believe Aesop existed generally agree that he lived during the 6th century B.C., lived for some time on the island of Samos, and was for at least part of his life a slave.
Aesop's Fables - Æsop's Fables Æ′sop's Fables were compiled by Babrios, a Greek, who lived...
www.factmonster.com /biography/var/aesop.html   (278 words)

  
 Life Of Aesop
It remains to state, that prior to this publication of M. Mezeriac, the life of Aesop was from the pen of Maximus Planudes, a monk of Constantinople, who was sent on an embassy to Venice by the Byzantine Emperor Andronicus the elder, and who wrote in the early part of the fourteenth century.
The rhetoricians and philosophers were accustomed to give the Fables of Aesop as an exercise to their scholars, not only inviting them to discuss the moral of the tale, but also to practice and to perfect themselves thereby in style and rules of grammar, by making for themselves new and various versions of the fables.
Bentley's Dissertations on the Epistles of Phalaris, and Fables of Aesop examined.
www.paganlibrary.com /etext/aesop/life_aesop.php   (4185 words)

  
 Aesop's Fablers Toastmasters · Improve your story telling and public speaking skills through practice and ...
Let Aesop's Fablers Toastmasters Club help you improve your story telling skills through practice and immediate feedback in a warm, supportive environment.
Aesop's Fablers are developing a "club" story that we can take on the road to present to Senior Centers, Storytelling Fairs, etc (anyplace that has ears to listen).
Aesop's Fablers Toastmasters Club 2591 is a member of Area 51, Division E of
www.freewebs.com /aesops_fablers_toastmasters   (441 words)

  
 Wendy's World of Stories for Children   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-11-07)
Aesop was born a slave around the year 620 B.C. In Ancient Greece, it was a privilege and tradition of freedmen to be interested in public affairs, so Aesop worked hard to raise himself from a servile slave's position to a high position of renown.
Aesop reconciled the inhabitants of these cities by telling his wise fables.
In memory of Aesop, a statue was erected in Athens.
www.wendy.com /children/aesop.html   (330 words)

  
 Aesop's Fables - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
Many stories included in Aesop's Fables, such as The Fox and the Grapes (from which the idiom "sour grapes" was derived), The Tortoise and the Hare, The North Wind and the Sun and The Boy Who Cried Wolf, are well-known throughout the world.
Aesop (from the Greek Αἴσωπος — Aisopos), famous for his fables, was a slave who lived between 620 and 560 BC in Ancient Greece.
Aesop's fables and the Panchatantra share about a dozen tales, leading to discussions whether the Greeks learned these fables from Indian storytellers or the other way, or if the influences were mutual.
en.wikipedia.org /wiki/Aesop's_Fables   (1182 words)

  
 Aesop's Life & Fables
And asked Aesop, since he was set on contradictions, to prepare the feast of the worst.
Aesop explained to the angry Xanthus that, "Was it not an evil tongue that caused a break with your family?
Aesop's made use of many animals in many of the fables he became famous for.
www.duboislc.net /read/Aesop/Aesop.html   (1159 words)

  
 The Association of European Schools of Planning
The aim of the award is to stimulate the development of planning courses or groups of courses in order to better prepare students for their forthcoming practice and research, and also to further educate practitioners.
It is the AESOP member school that gets the prise, though at a world planning congress it is pleasant with the cooperation the Planning School at Ohio State University, Columbus, in the United States.
AESOP’s 2005 and first Best Congress Paper Prize was awarded to Robbert Zandvliet, Martin Dijst and Luca Bertolini for their their paper: Examinig Space-time Sustainability: Economic, Environmental and Social Impacts of Temporary Populations.
www.aesop-planning.com /Prize.html   (1181 words)

  
 Aesop Books (Used, New, Out-of-Print) - Alibris
This definitive and fully annotated modern edition of the Fables is the first translation ever to make available the complete corpus of 358 fables attributed to Aesop, displaying his humor, insight, and savage wit, as well as affording fascinating glimpses of everyday life in ancient Greece.
Illustrated by Lisa McCue, this simple retelling of the Aesop fable is sure to be a great introduction to these classics for children.
In clever verse, Yolen adds a fresh twist to 13 of Aesop's best-known fables, including "The Hare and the Tortoise", "The Lion and the Mouse", and "The Grasshopper and the Ant".
www.alibris.com /search/books/author/Aesop   (836 words)

  
 Aesop
Aesop began its journey in 1987 as an alternative offering of skin and wellbeing products developed for those seeking effective, botanical-based solutions.
Aesop formulations are loaded with high concentrations of antioxidants, polyphenols and other goodies to deliver exceptional results.
Aesop’s distinctive packaging is both functional and beautiful, as the dark amber colour permits reduction of product preservative levels through reduced UV penetration.
www.mankind.co.uk /goshopping.asp?objectaquaproductdetails=1&GroupID=827   (261 words)

  
 Aesop Summary   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-11-07)
Aesop (also spelled Æsop; from the Greek Αισωπος, Aisōpos), known only for his fables, was by tradition a slave who lived from about 620 to 560 BC in Ancient Greece.
Aesop's Fables are still taught as moral lessons and used as subjects for vari...
Aesop: Aesop, as depicted in the Nuremberg Chronicle.
www.bookrags.com /Aesop   (244 words)

  
 [No title]
Aesop must have been freed, for he conducted the public defence of a certain Samian demagogue (Aristotle, Rhetoric, ii.
"Aesop" is a powerful tool that allows you to create animated GIF images (banners, buttons, labels, lines and headings) for web-sites and even logos for mobile phones quickly and easily (click to see samples).
His given name, Aesop, is the Ancient Greek word for "Ethiop", the archaic word for a dark-skinned person of African origin.
www.lycos.com /info/aesop.html   (619 words)

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