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Topic: African American dance


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In the News (Thu 21 Mar 19)

  
 African, African American Music Ideas
African American Music/History Wade in the Water was used by Harriet Tubman to warn runaway slaves to wade in the water to throw of the dog/people trackers.
AFRICAN PLANTING DANCE directions: This dance was taught to us by some visiting performers at an assembly.
African songs--a few years ago we did a whole year of Africa."Roots and Branches" was a great resource, as was Music K8---check their index.
www.angelfire.com /nb2/musicedresources/African.html   (11280 words)

  
 African American - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
From its music and dance, to speech, demeanor, and foodways, African American culture bears the strong imprint of West Africa, particularly in rural portions of the Deep South and Sea Islands of Georgia and South Carolina.
African Americans significantly have improved their social and economic standing since the Civil Rights Movement, and recent decades have witnessed the expansion of a robust, African American middle class across the United States.
The desperate conditions of African Americans in the South that sparked the Great Migration of the early 20th century, combined with a growing African American intellectual and cultural elite in the Northern United States, led to a movement to fight violence and discrimination against African Americans that, like abolitionism before it, crossed racial lines.
en.wikipedia.org /wiki/African_American   (3187 words)

  
 African-American Studies
Chuck Davis performs with his company, the African American Dance Ensemble, on one of his frequent trips to West Africa.
This is the story of African American women who migrated from the rural South during the first three decades of the twentieth century and worked as domestic workers to support their families.
This is the story of Roy Smith, an African American born in the Mississippi delta during the Ku Klux Klan era.
www.filmakers.com /AfroAmerican.htm   (2857 words)

  
 African American Music
Perhaps worthy of special mention are the Pinkster festivals held in various cities of New York state, in whch African-Americans danced traditional dances to the music of drums and singing, while large crowds of white spectators watched the "exotic" scenes.
Although Africans who were sold into slavery were stripped of their possessions, clamped into irons, and wedged into foul vessels to make the dreaded "middle passage" from Africa to America, they nevertheless brought with them to the new land their memories of the rich music and dance traditions of the lands of their ancestors.
The contributions of African-Americans to the history of music in the United States began with the arrival of the first Blacks on the mainland in 1619.
afgen.com /music.html   (308 words)

  
 Jukebox
The term "juke box" came into use in the United States in the 1930s, derived from African-American slang "jook" meaning "dance".
In the 1910s the cylinder was superseded by the gramophone record.
The shellac 78rpm record dominated jukeboxes until the Seeburg Corporation introduced an all 45 rpm vinyl record jukebox in 1950.
www.free-download-soft.com /info/jukebox.html   (308 words)

  
 Jazz article - Jazz jazz (disambiguation) African American music Blues African American - What-Means.com
Jazz is rooted in West African cultural and musical expression and in African American music traditions, in folk blues and ragtime.
African musical celebrations held at least as late as the 1830s in New Orleans' "Congo Square" were attended by interested whites as well, and some of their melodies and rhythms found their way into the compositions of white Creole composer Louis Moreau Gottschalk.
At the root of jazz is the blues, the folk music of former African slaves in the U.S. South and their descendants, heavily influenced by West African cultural and musical traditions that evolved as black musicians migrated to the cities.
www.what-means.com /encyclopedia/Jazz   (308 words)

  
 African American Studies
Over the last two decades, however, the emergence of music videos has created the need for a critical and scholarly understanding of the emerging forces of African American music, dance, and drama in the United States from the 1950s to the present.
African American studies is an interdisciplinary program designed to enrich knowledge of the experience of African Americans from the past to the present, both within and beyond the United States.
Examples of specific study areas are African American pedagogy and philosophy-practice, tracking, race and educational research, teacher effectiveness and accountability, and the elimination and reinvention of parent involvement.
abacus.bates.edu /catalog97-98/aas.html   (308 words)

  
 International Association of African-American Music [IAAAM.com]
Williams has contributed her efforts as a board member with American Women in Radio and Television, The Philadelphia Dance Company, Black Music Association and currently serves on the boards of both The Philadelphia Fund and The National Endowment for the Arts.
Affectionately named "The Ambassador of African-American Music" by American Express’ Platinum Departures magazine, Dyana Williams’ is the recipient of numerous awards and accolades including a Liberty Bell from Mayor John Street and the City of Philadelphia as well as a citation from the Pennsylvania State House of Representatives.
Following the lead of Presidents Carter and Clinton (both of whom recognized June as Black Music Month), Bill 509 was instituted as a means to give credence to the contributions of African-American music as an economic entity.
www.iaaam.com /cofounder1.html   (1285 words)

  
 The Sound Of The Cities
Post-World War II African-American popular dance music was clearly the product of cities, of urban culture.
We have, for the past 50 years, for better and worse, in the ache of dire poverty and in the transcendence of wondrous artistic achievement, been living in the age of the black city--and the age when African-American culture has had its biggest impact on, and presence in, American life.
From the emergence of rhythm and blues to the current stylings of hip-hop, the contemporary American city has, musically at least, belonged to blacks.
www.sonymusic.com /artists/SoundtrackForACentury/ns4/story/rb1.html   (1285 words)

  
 The Force
It is because of the force, the palpable, transfixing passion, humanity, and lyricism of African-American popular dance music, accompanied by the sweeping acceleration of American history in the last 50 years, that sometimes makes us think that somehow the story of this music has been the fulfillment of a certain national historical destiny.
Funky beats, sophisticated arrangements, and worldly lyrics-these were qualities that characterized the music of Kenny Gamble and Leon Huff.
Did the music shape social history, or unconsciously reflect it, or both?
www.sonymusic.com /artists/SoundtrackForACentury/ns4/story/rb2.html   (1285 words)

  
 Gerald Gill '70 Will Speak on "African-American Popular Music and Dance as Cultural Expression and Political Protest during the 1960s-1970s"
Gerald Gill '70 Will Speak on "African-American Popular Music and Dance as Cultural Expression and Political Protest during the 1960s-1970s"
EASTON, Pa.(www.lafayette.edu), April 16, 2002 — Gerald Gill '70, associate professor of history at Tufts University, will speak on "African-American Popular Music and Dance as Cultural Expression and Political Protest during the 1960s-1970s" 4:10 p.m.
Gill is a member of eight professional associations, including the American Historical Association, and has worked as a consultant for media companies, a number of documentary film projects, and several PBS series, including "Africans in America" produced by WGBH, Boston.
www.lafayette.edu /news.php/view/1003   (1285 words)

  
 C. K. Ladzekpo - African Music and Dance
We are always adding material about the music and culture of the Ewe and other African ethnic groups, along with related graphics, sound, and videos that you can download.
Concert of African Music and Dance at UC Berkeley
Home Page has original material about African culture.
www.cnmat.berkeley.edu /~ladzekpo   (74 words)

  
 African American - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
From its music and dance, to speech, demeanor, and foodways, African American culture bears the strong imprint of West Africa, particularly in rural portions of the Deep South and the Sea Islands of Georgia and South Carolina.
African Americans have significantly improved their social and economic standing since the Civil War, and even more so since the Civil Rights Movement, and recent decades have witnessed the expansion of a robust, African American middle class across the United States.
The desperate conditions of African Americans in the South that sparked the Great Migration of the early 20th century, combined with a growing African American intellectual and cultural elite in the Northern United States, led to a movement to fight violence and discrimination against African Americans that, like abolitionism before it, crossed racial lines.
en.wikipedia.org /wiki/African_American   (3400 words)

  
 KET Black History Links
African Americans and related topics profiled in the series have included sculptor Ed Hamilton, Chautauqua performer Hasan Davis, the Negro Leagues’ Lexington Hustlers, Camp Nelson, the Emma Reno Connor Black History Gallery, and the Affrilachians—African Americans raised in Eastern Kentucky.
This comprehensive collection of award-winning documentaries traces the struggles of African Americans to gain rights in the areas of education, work, and full legal equality under the Constitution.
This content-rich professional development program deepens teachers’ knowledge of West African dance with step-by-step instructions and explanations of the cultural meanings of the movements.
www.ket.org /Education/IN/blackhistory.html   (2081 words)

  
 AFRICAN AMERICAN RESOURCES
Coverage for the periodical index is 1989 to the present; African American core scholarly journals and important leisure publications are the focus of the index.
This is a selected list of specialized reference resources that are useful for beginning research in African American studies.
From the State Historical Society of Wisconsin Library, a leader in the collection, preservation, and promotion of African American periodicals.
www.strategenius.org /african_american_resources.htm   (3846 words)

  
 Great Performances: Free To Dance - Resources - Web
This dance company seeks to fuse the diverse and rich African and African-American dance traditions of the past with the essence and spirit of today's hip-hop.
Celebrating traditional African culture, aesthetics, and values, the African-American Dance Ensemble seeks to preserve the finest traditions of African and African-American dance and music through education and performance.
One of the first black performing arts companies in the Washington D.C. area, African Heritage Dancers and Drummers offers dance, music, and crafts workshops for children and youth as a multicultural educational tool.
www.pbs.org /wnet/freetodance/resources.html   (3846 words)

  
 Inventory of the Richard A. Long Papers
Abstract: The collection consists of the papers of African American scholar Richard A. Long from 1948 to 1995 and document his academic interest in African American arts including dance, literature, and art.
Brochure - Body and Soul: The American Dance Center, an exhibition by the New York Public Library for the Performing Arts and Dance Theater Foundation, February 26, 1993 - May 23, 1992
American Dance Festival: The Black Tradition in American Modern Dance, 1988
dlg.galileo.usg.edu /aafa/html/aafa_aarl95-005.html   (8486 words)

  
 Dance
For many Americans, African dance, from the plantation Ring Shout and Cakewalk to the Jazz Age Charleston, Black Bottom, and tap, served to liberate from the rigid restrictions of European dance and culture.
In the early 1900s, when American choreographers Isadora Duncan, Loie Fuller, and Ruth St. Denis created a revolutionary alternative to Europe's classical ballet, African-American dancers played a role in this "aesthetic dance" movement.
As time went on, African dances left an indelible imprint on American dance.
members.cruzio.com /~twoeels/LoweProject/Dance.htm   (160 words)

  
 Amazon.com: African-American Concert Dance: The Harlem Renaissance and Beyond: Books: John O., III Perpener
African-American Concert Dance significantly advances the study of pioneering black dancers by providing valuable biographical and historical information on a group of artists who worked during the 1920s, 1930s, and 1940s to legitimize black dance as a serious art form.
In one of the stronger themes of this study, he shows how African American dancers fought through racism to develop a new art form.
Dafora's African Dance Troupe, which at one point came under the umbrella of the WPA Federal Theatre Project, was a focal point of the famous "voodoo" Macbeth, an all-black production set in Haiti and directed by the young Orson Welles.
www.amazon.com /exec/obidos/tg/detail/-/0252026756?v=glance   (1105 words)

  
 Dayton Contemporary Dance Company explores African-American heritage
Blunden has painstakingly led the Dayton Contemporary Dance Company to national and international prominence by recovering and breathing new life into lost classics and expanding the African-American dance repertory through the creation and presentation of new works.
The work was created in 1932 for what would become the African Dance Troupe of the Federal Theatre Project.
With special guest Gerald E. Myers, director of humanities at the American Dance Festival, this event will explore the relationship between African-American dance and the black church.
www.uiowa.edu /~ournews/1997/december/1231dance.html   (726 words)

  
 The African-American Theme Wedding
The African-American wedding is truly a celebration of the marriage and the couple's roots.
A popular African-American tradition is known as "jumping the broom" signifying that after the couples exchange their wedding vows, they jump over, or step into their new life together, and it usually takes place at the end of the ceremony.
Its symbolism can be expressed in different ways: in the selection of the music (such as a gospel choir, drums, African dance), in colorful or African attire for the wedding party, in the display of the table decorations, and by providing an ethnic feast, including the cake decorations.
www.africanamericanweddingexpo.com /history.htm   (319 words)

  
 Great Performances: DANCE IN AMERICA: Free To Dance
DANCE IN AMERICA presents "Free To Dance" a three-part documentary that chronicles the crucial role that African-American choreographers and dancers have played in the development of modern dance as an American art form.
Explore the "Free To Dance" Web companion, which offers information about the series, a dance timeline, essays on dance history and the African-American contribution to modern dance, biographies of notable dance personalities, links to relevant dance resources online, and more.
"Free To Dance" is a co-production of the American Dance Festival (ADF) and The John F. Kennedy Center for the Performing Arts in association with Thirteen/WNET New York.
www.pbs.org /wnet/freetodance   (319 words)

  
 Great Performances: DANCE IN AMERICA: Free To Dance
DANCE IN AMERICA presents "Free To Dance" a three-part documentary that chronicles the crucial role that African-American choreographers and dancers have played in the development of modern dance as an American art form.
Explore the "Free To Dance" Web companion, which offers information about the series, a dance timeline, essays on dance history and the African-American contribution to modern dance, biographies of notable dance personalities, links to relevant dance resources online, and more.
"Free To Dance" is a co-production of the American Dance Festival (ADF) and The John F. Kennedy Center for the Performing Arts in association with Thirteen/WNET New York.
www.pbs.org /wnet/freetodance   (319 words)

  
 Teaching the Journal of American History
But African Americans themselves exercised little control over the terms of their employment or the kinds of music they could produce professionally, and by the late 1910s they were even being displaced as the primary interpreters of the musical styles they had originated.
At the other end of the blues spectrum, Black Swan did record the singer and actress Isabelle Washington, whose bluesy renditions of popular songs sounded "white"--that is, the mannered warble of her voice conformed to stereotypes about white singers' thin, controlled, trained voices, in contrast to the muscular, roughhewn singing style ascribed to African Americans.
When African Americans did make records, the recordings were limited to comedy or novelty styles, which established "coon songs" and minstrelsy as the paradigm of African American culture within the industry.
www.indiana.edu /~jah/teaching/2004_03/article.shtml   (12224 words)

  
 Great Performances: Free To Dance - Resources - Web
Celebrating traditional African culture, aesthetics, and values, the African-American Dance Ensemble seeks to preserve the finest traditions of African and African-American dance and music through education and performance.
The oldest modern dance company in Ohio, the Dayton Contemporary Dance Company is one of the featured performers in "Free To Dance." Biographies of company members and founder Jeraldyne Blunden can be found on this Web site.
Founded in 1976 by Ann Williams, Dallas' oldest continuously operating professional dance company's mission is to extend opportunities to people of color and connect people of different cultures through performance and educational programs that reach diverse communities.
www.pbs.org /wnet/freetodance/resources.html   (12224 words)

  
 Processed.txt
My father is half choctaw apache of louisiana, my m other is kosiata, creek and african american.
My father is half choctaw apache of louisiana, my mother is kosiata, creek and african american.
It was only after I was an adult and moved away from home that I realized how much of the way I was raised was in the tradition of na tive americans.
www.bnaa.org /guestbook/Processed.txt   (12224 words)

  
 Dance - Educational Technology Clearinghouse
Celebrating traditional African culture, aesthetics, and values, the African-American Dance Ensemble seeks to preserve the finest traditions of African and African-American dance and music through education and performance.
For ballet to retain its vigor it is vital to have professional classical ballet teachers, equipped with internationally recognized qualifications, imparting their knowledge and love of dance to future generations.
Descriptive histories on the proliferation of dances like the "Cakewalk," the "Black Bottom," and the "Charleston" as well as information on dancers Master Juba and Zip Coon.
etc.usf.edu /dance/index.htm   (792 words)

  
 UC Davis/African American -- Agronomy
Investigates the social relevance of African American dance and the artistic merits and contributions of African American choreographers and performers.
The emphasis in African American (U.S.A.) culture includes courses on the history, culture, arts, literature of African Americans, the patterns of their socio-political and cultural movements, and the struggle with racism as a social and psychological problem.
Students are encouraged to combine an examination of African American history and culture in the U.S.A. with African or diaspora studies.
registrar.ucdavis.edu /UCDWebCatalog96_97/WebCatCrs/gc96-7_pg120-130.html   (792 words)

  
 Great Performances: Free To Dance - Dance Timeline (1619-1889)
African American William Henry Lane, also known as "Juba," claims the title "the greatest dancer of his time." Many believe Lane is the dancer Charles Dickens praises when describing a visit to the Five Points area of New York City in his book AMERICAN NOTES.
White performer Thomas Dartmouth "Daddy" Rice adds a new twist to the tradition of mimicking African Americans, and his "Jim Crow" dance earns him the title "father of blackface minstrelsy." Minstrel shows produce two major stereotypes that haunt black performers for years -- the clown and the dandy.
In DANSE, Moreau de St.-Mery describes African dance in the Caribbean and the fascination mingled with repulsion with which whites greet the "Calenda," "Bamboula," "Chica," and other secular and sacred dances.
www.pbs.org /wnet/freetodance/timeline   (792 words)

  
 Inventory of the Richard A. Long Papers
Abstract: The collection consists of the papers of African American scholar Richard A. Long from 1948 to 1995 and document his academic interest in African American arts including dance, literature, and art.
Brochure - Body and Soul: The American Dance Center, an exhibition by the New York Public Library for the Performing Arts and Dance Theater Foundation, February 26, 1993 - May 23, 1992
The bulk of the collection is made up of dance performance programs, art exhibit opening invitations, conference programs and schedules, the papers of symposia participants, galley proofs of books, draft dissertations and a variety of other items.
dlg.galileo.usg.edu /aafa/html/aafa_aarl95-005.html   (8486 words)

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