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Topic: Afroasiatic languages


In the News (Wed 18 Oct 17)

  
  Afroasiatic languages
Afroasiatic languages: The Egyptian Languages - The Egyptian Languages The Egyptian branch of the Afroasiatic family comprises Ancient Egyptian and...
Afroasiatic languages: The Chadic Languages - The Chadic Languages The Chadic group of languages are spoken near Lake Chad in central Africa.
Afroasiatic languages: The Semitic Languages - The Semitic Languages The Semitic languages are believed to have evolved from a hypothetical parent...
www.factmonster.com /ce6/society/A0802682.html   (313 words)

  
 Afroasiatic languages - HighBeam Encyclopedia   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-11-01)
AFROASIATIC LANGUAGES [Afroasiatic languages], formerly Hamito-Semitic languages, family of languages spoken by more than 250 million people in N Africa; much of the Sahara; parts of E, central, and W Africa; and W Asia (especially the Arabian peninsula, Iraq, Syria, Jordan, Lebanon, and Israel).
According to one theory, the languages of the Afroasiatic family are thought to have first been spoken along the shores of the Red Sea.
A Semitic language (or languages) was brought from S Arabia to Ethiopia during the first millennium BC At that time the indigenous languages of Ethiopia were Cushitic, and these languages strongly influenced the imported Semitic tongues.
www.freeencyclopedia.com /html/A/Afroasia.asp   (2118 words)

  
 Afro-Asiatic languages - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
The Afro-Asiatic languages constitute a language family with about 375 languages (SIL estimate) and more than 300 million speakers spread throughout North Africa, East Africa, the Sahel, and Southwest Asia (including some 200 million speakers of Arabic).
Many people regard the Ongota language as Omotic, but its classification within the family remains controversial, partly for lack of data.
Tonal languages appear in the Omotic, Chadic, and South and East Cushitic branches of Afro-Asiatic, according to Ehret (1996).
en.wikipedia.org /wiki/Afroasiatic_languages   (1201 words)

  
 Native American languages - Facts from the Encyclopedia - Yahoo! Education   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-11-01)
A language family consists of two or more tongues that are distinct and yet related historically in that they are all descended from a single ancestor language, either known or assumed to have existed.
Native American languages cannot be differentiated as a linguistic unit from other languages of the world but are grouped into a number of separate linguistic stocks having significantly different phonetics, vocabularies, and grammars.
The languages of the Tanoan branch of Aztec-Tanoan are spoken in the Rio Grande valley, New Mexico, and Arizona.
messenger.yahooligans.com /reference/encyclopedia/entry/NatvAmlang   (3052 words)

  
 Highbeam Encyclopedia - Search Results for Semitic languages   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-11-01)
Afroasiatic languages AFROASIATIC LANGUAGES [Afroasiatic languages], formerly Hamito-Semitic languages, family of languages spoken by more than 250 million people in N Africa; much of the Sahara; parts of E, central, and W Africa; and W Asia (especially the Arabian peninsula, Iraq, Syria, Jordan, Lebanon, and Israel).
Hebrew language HEBREW LANGUAGE [Hebrew language] member of the Canaanite group of the West Semitic subdivision of the Semitic subfamily of the Afroasiatic family of languages (see Afroasiatic languages).
Arabic languages ARABIC LANGUAGES [Arabic languages] members of the West Semitic group of the Semitic subdivision of the Afroasiatic family of languages (see Afroasiatic languages).
www.encyclopedia.com /articles/11682.html   (566 words)

  
 Robert Hetzron - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
He was first and foremost a linguist who specialized in Afroasiatic languages and whose work embraced comparative studies, semantic analysis and theoretical aspects of grammar.
A large proportion of his work had to do with the Afroasiatic languages, where he made contributions in comparative and historical studies that fundamentally defined that field.
He did fieldwork in Ethiopia on Semitic and Cushitic languages in 1965-66 and was awarded the Ph.D. in Near Eastern languages in 1966.
en.wikipedia.org /wiki/Robert_Hetzron   (642 words)

  
 The 6000 or so languages of the world are grouped in families, of which members of each family are descendant languages ...
Much less studied than Indoeurpoean, Afroasiatic owes its secondary importance to the long historical connection of its speakers in the East Mediterranean early history of Europe, and the fact that the earliest writing, after Sumerian, was in the Afroasiatic languages Egyptian and Semitic Akkadian, from about 5500 BP.
The discovery that most European languages are descendants of a single language (usually credited to William Jones in 1786) was foundational in the establishment of the fields of anthropology and linguistics.
The study of Afroasiatic offers a needed contrast and comparison to Indo-European studies, expands our knowledge of Indo-Asian prehistory, and provides a model for progress in the unification and integration of study of lesser-known peoples of the world through discovery of the family membership of their languages.
www.msu.edu /~hudson/aabo.htm   (1701 words)

  
 African languages. The Columbia Encyclopedia, Sixth Edition. 2001-05
Benue-Congo includes the huge Bantu group of hundreds of tongues found throughout central and S Africa (see Bantu languages), as well as such non-Bantu languages as Tiv, Jukun, and Efik, which are spoken in Nigeria and Cameroon.
All of the Khoisan languages appear to use tones to distinguish meanings, and the Khoikhoi languages and some of the San languages inflect the noun to show case, number, and gender.
Swahili, a Bantu tongue of the Niger-Kordofanian stock, was written before the European conquest of Africa (see Swahili language), and Vai, a language belonging to the Mande subdivision of Niger-Congo, employs an indigenous script developed in the 19th cent.
www.bartleby.com /65/af/Africanlng.html   (1428 words)

  
 AllRefer.com - African languages (Language And Linguistics) - Encyclopedia
Historically the term refers to the languages of sub-Saharan Africa, which do not belong to a single family, but are divided among several distinct linguistic stocks.
These languages are spoken in all parts of the continent, from the extreme south up to the territory of the Afroasiatic languages of N Africa.
Some authorities believe that the languages spoken in the Niger-Kordofanian and Nilo-Saharan families are sufficiently similar to suggest that both stocks had the same ancestor language.
reference.allrefer.com /encyclopedia/A/Africanlng.html   (373 words)

  
 afroasiatic languages
Afroasiatic languages: The Egyptian Languages - The Egyptian Languages The...
Of all the Afroasiatic languages, Ancient Egyptian is the one for which there is the...
Afroasiatic languages are a group of related languages spoken by various communities...
www.startupaudio.it /search/Afroasiatic-languages.htm   (195 words)

  
 Afroasiatic languages. The Columbia Encyclopedia, Sixth Edition. 2001-05
A Semitic language (or languages) was brought from S Arabia to Ethiopia during the first millennium
B.C. At that time the indigenous languages of Ethiopia were Cushitic, and these languages strongly influenced the imported Semitic tongues.
B.C. from the Sumerians (see Sumer), whose language was not a Semitic tongue.
www.bartleby.com /65/af/Afroasia.html   (2033 words)

  
 The Afroasiatic Index Project
The Afroasiatic Index Project is a scholarly initiative that aims at creating an etymological database of Afroasiatic languages.
The file format and programs were not specific to the language base being investigated here (i.e., Cushitic and Omotic), and could be used as-is to encode etymological information for sets of related words in other language groups.
Presumably, if they were used on another language family, differences in goals and methods would lead to changes in the structure and presentation of the data.
www-oi.uchicago.edu /OI/PROJ/CUS/AAindex.html   (1375 words)

  
 Exerts From "Amharic Verb Morphology: A Generative Approach"
The eight named languages might be considered the major Ethiopian languages: they account for about 5/6 of the total population, and no other language exceeds 500,000 speakers.
The conquering Semitic-speakers spoke a language which was perhaps only four to seven centuries removed from a common origin with Giiz, the classical language of the Aksum Empire and of Medieval Ethiopian religion and literature.
This language is now by the accidents of history, a post-creole and the national language of Ethiopia.
www.abyssiniagateway.net /info/bender.html   (1976 words)

  
 North American Conference on Afroasiatic Linguistics | NACAL
Papers on linguistic topics relevant to the languages of the Afroasiatic phylum (Chadic, Berber, Cushitic, Omotic, Egyptian, Semitic) are requested.
While all topics relating to aspects of Afroasiatic languages will be considered, including phonology, grammar, syntax, synchrony, diachrony, sociolinguistics, and epigraphy, the 35th meeting will be dedicated to the memory of Robert Hetzron (1937-1997).
No original paper will be rejected on account of its subject, so long as it relates to the languages of the Afroasiatic phylum and it meets the standards established by previous conferences.
www.mandaic.org /nacal/index.htm   (531 words)

  
 Relations between Indoeuropean and Afroasiatic Languages
On the other hand it is well known nowadays that the Semitic languages are one of six coordinate branches of the Afroasiatic (=Hamitosemitic = Erythraeic = Lisramic) languages beside Ancient Egyptian, Cushitic, Omotic, Chadic and Berberic.
At least this is the point from where on it can no longer be decided whether common features of two compared languages are due to a historical relationship between them or not, that means that the limit of (possible) coincidence is reached.
This fact is due to the possibility of historical relations like mixing or reciprocal influencing of neighbouring languages or language families.
www.dabis.at /Anwender.htm/Alscher/afroasia.htm   (740 words)

  
 Afroasiatic languages - HighBeam Encyclopedia   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-11-01)
The writing used for Semitic languages is either cuneiform or alphabetic writing.
All Semitic languages are writtten from right to left except Ethiopic, Assyrian, and Babylonian, which are written from left to right.
Find newspaper and magazine articles plus images and maps related to "Afroasiatic languages" at HighBeam.
www.free-encyclopedia.com /html/A/Afroasia.asp   (2118 words)

  
 Highbeam Encyclopedia - Search Results for Hebrew language   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-11-01)
Yiddish language YIDDISH LANGUAGE [Yiddish language], a member of the West Germanic group of the Germanic subfamily of the Indo-European family of languages (see Germanic languages ; German language).
Aramaic ARAMAIC [Aramaic], language belonging to the West Semitic subdivision of the Semitic subfamily of the Afroasiatic family of languages (see Afroasiatic languages).
grammar GRAMMAR [grammar] description of the structure of a language, consisting of the sounds (see phonology); the meaningful combinations of these sounds into words or parts of words, called morphemes; and the arrangement of the morphemes into phrases and sentences, called syntax.
www.encyclopedia.com /SearchResults.aspx?Q=Hebrew+language   (730 words)

  
 Web resources for Omotic languages
There are up to 30 Omotic languages, all of which are spoken in southern and south-western Ethiopia.
Hayward, Richard J. Omotic: the 'empty quarter' of Afroasiatic linguistics.
In: Research in Afroasiatic grammar II: selected papers from the fifth conference on Afroasiatic languages (ed.
goto.glocalnet.net /maho/webresources/omotic.html   (337 words)

  
 Afroasiatic Languages - ENCYCLOPEDIA - The History Channel UK
Afroasiatic languages, family of languages spoken by more than 250 million people in N Africa; much of the Sahara; parts of E, central, and W Africa; and W Asia (especially the Arabian peninsula, Iraq, Syria, Jordan, Lebanon, and Israel).
A Semitic language (or languages) was brought from S Arabia to Ethiopia during the first millennium &BC; At that time the indigenous languages of Ethiopia were Cushitic, and these languages strongly influenced the imported Semitic tongues.
This alphabet was taken to Ethiopia during the first millennium &BC; and is still used there, in modified form, for the Ethiopic languages.
www.thehistorychannel.co.uk /staging/search/search.php?searchtext=ottoman&refinetext=&search_page=3&themes=&cts=&word=Afroasia   (2095 words)

  
 Gene B. Gragg
Gene Gragg has been involved in both linguistics and languages of the Near East since the time when, as a graduate student in the Department of Linguistics at the University of Chicago (1962-66), he became interested in applying linguistic rigor to the study of Ancient Near Eastern languages.
The result was a dissertation on the dimensional infixes of Sumerian, a short form of which was eventually published as The Dimensional Infixes of Sumerian (Neukirchen, 1973).
Since coming back to the University of Chicago in 1969, with a joint appointment in the Departments of Linguistics and Near Eastern Languages and Civilizations, he has divided his teaching time between the two departments, with time off for a year of field work in Ethiopia.
humanities.uchicago.edu /depts/nelc/facultypages/gragg/index.html   (740 words)

  
 HEC refs
If you know of publications on these languages which should be included, please let me know at hudson@msu.edu.
The influence of Sidamo on the Ethiopic languages of Gurage.
A note on the relative chronology of the Cushitic verb and genetic classification of the Cushitic languages.
www.msu.edu /~hudson/HECrefs.htm   (2254 words)

  
 yourDictionary.com • Library
What the dictionaries do not say is that the Arabic term itself derives from a far more ancient root word of the Afroasiatic language family, to which Arabic belongs, with a rather different meaning.
The speakers of the ancestral language of the Cushitic branch of Afroasiatic languages extended this root to *kw'it'al- by adding a noun suffix *-al and gave it the more specific meaning "pubic hair."
The most interesting upshot of this change in meaning was that several Cushitic languages in recent centuries drafted the word into use as a euphemism (an acceptable word that replaces an unacceptable one) for the genitals.
www.yourdictionary.com /library/cotton.html   (430 words)

  
 John Benjamins: Book details for Research in Afroasiatic Grammar II [CILT 241]
Research in Afroasiatic Grammar II Selected papers from the Fifth Conference on Afroasiatic Languages, Paris, 2000
The authors report their latest research on the syntax, morphology, and phonology of quite a number of languages (Arabic, Hebrew, Amharic, Tigrinya, Coptic Egyptian, Berber, Hausa, Beja, Somali, Gamo).
Given its coverage, the book is a valuable resource for anyone interested in Afroasiatic languages and theoretical linguistics.
www.benjamins.com /cgi-bin/t_bookview.cgi?bookid=CILT%20241   (294 words)

  
 Web resources for Afroasiatic languages in Africa
There are some 250, maybe more, Afroasiatic (aka Afrasian, Erythraic, Lisramic, Hamito-Semitic) languages spoken in Africa.
Swedish contributions to African linguistics, with a focus on Nilo-Saharan and Afro-Asiatic languages (PDF).
Africa and Asia: Göteborg working papers on Asian and African languages and literatures, v 3, p 53-63.
goto.glocalnet.net /maho/webresources/afroasiatic.html   (119 words)

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