Factbites
 Where results make sense
About us   |   Why use us?   |   Reviews   |   PR   |   Contact us  

Topic: Akkadian language


Related Topics

In the News (Sat 9 Dec 17)

  
  Akkadian language
Semitic language, which served as the common language of peoples of the Middle East for about 300 years, from the 9th century until the 7th century BCE when Aramaic started to supplant it.
The language was in use for 2,500 years in and around Mesopotamia.
Akkadian was written in a cuneiform script, with about 600 different signs for either words or syllables.
i-cias.com /e.o/akkadn.htm   (181 words)

  
  Akkadian College of Divinity: Akkadia, the Akkadian language
Akkadian (or Babylonian-Assyrian) is the collective name for the spoken languages of the culture in Mesopotamia, the area between the rivers Euphrates and Tigris.
Akkadian, the oldest known member of the family of Semitic languages, succeeded Sumerian as the vernacular tongue of Mesopotamia and was spoken by the Babylonians and Assyrians over a period of nearly two thousand years.
It was adopted by the Akkadians ca.2500 BC from the Sumerians, whose language was not a Semitic tongue.
divinity.insights2.org /Akkadian.html   (1065 words)

  
  Kids.Net.Au - Encyclopedia > Akkadian language
Akkadian was a language of the Semitic family spoken in ancient Mesopotamia.
Cuneiform was in many ways unsuited to Akkadian: among its flaws were its inability to represent glottal stops, pharyngial stops, and emphatic consonants[?], as well as a syllabic construction completely inappropriate for languages demonstrating the triconsonantal root[?].
Akkadian was an inflected language, possessing three cases (nominative, accusative, and genitive), three numbers (singular, dual, and plural), and verb conjugations for first, second, and third persons.
www.kids.net.au /encyclopedia-wiki/ak/Akkadian_language   (253 words)

  
 Glossary Akkadian
Akkadian (or Babylonian-Assyrian) is the collective name for the spoken languages of the culture in the three millennia BCE in Mesopotamia, the area between the rivers Euphrates and Tigris, approx.
The name Akkadian --so called in ancient time-- is derived from the city-state of Akkad, founded in the middle of the third millennium BCE and capital of one of the first great empires after the dawn of human history.
Akkadian has been for centuries the international medium of communication, the lingua franca or language of diplomacy in the Ancient Near East.
www.sron.nl /~jheise/akkadian/akexplan.html   (408 words)

  
 Proto-Semitic Language and Culture. The American Heritage Dictionary of the English Language, Fourth Edition. 2000
A distinctive characteristic of the Semitic languages is the formation of words by the combination of a “root” of consonants in a fixed order, usually three, and a “pattern” of vowels and, sometimes, affixes before and after the root.
The outcomes of the Proto-Semitic consonants in Akkadian, Ethiopic, Arabic, Hebrew, and Aramaic are illustrated in the table "Proto-Semitic Sound Correspondences".
Since English is an Indo-European language and therefore not genetically related to the Semitic family, all words of Semitic origin in English are loanwords.
www.bartleby.com /61/10.html   (3655 words)

  
 Babylonia: country, language, religion, culture
The Akkadian language is called after Agade, a not identified city that was the first to use Akkadian as the language of its chancellery.
His son Cambyses accepted the Babylonian calendar, and Akkadian was one of the three official languages in the early period of Persian domination.
The Persian government increasingly preferred Aramaic as the language of their chancellery, and the Akkadian language was no longer used in the Achaemenid royal inscriptions after the reign of Artaxerxes I Makrocheir (465-424).
www.livius.org /ba-bd/babylon/babylonia.html   (2481 words)

  
 72Languages.com - Ancient Language Research
All world languages are derived from a more powerful original language which circumscribes them all
Numbers of the original language and the affinities of modern languages
Dictionary of the early language, correlated with early Cuneiform, Hieroglyphic, and Phoenician scripts, and preserved elements in Hebrew and Chinese
72languages.com   (195 words)

  
 Language Log
Attentive Language Log readers will recognize that the third reading is the most plausible one, given the source of the headline.
Because the language of economists is often -- not always, certainly, but often -- deeply obtuse.
It should perhaps be shocking that the presenter felt it necessary to prepare a handout on such a topic, but what is REALLY shocking is that the description of the procedure in the handout was wrong, and that the error could not be attributed to a simple typographical error.
itre.cis.upenn.edu /~myl/languagelog   (5837 words)

  
 Akkadian language
Semitic language, which served as the common language of peoples of the Middle East for about 300 years, from the 9th century until the 7th century BCE when Aramaic started to supplant it.
The language was in use for 2,500 years in and around Mesopotamia.
Akkadian was written in a cuneiform script, with about 600 different signs for either words or syllables.
www.lexicorient.com /e.o/akkadn.htm   (181 words)

  
 Ancient Scripts: Akkadian   (Site not responding. Last check: )
However, it was the ascendency of the Akkadian dynasty in 2300 BCE that positioned Akkadian over Sumerian as the primary language of Mesopotamia.
Akkadian, however, is infectional, meaning that the basic form of a word, called a root, can be modified in a myriad of ways to create words of related but different meanings.
In particular, the basis of Semitic languages is the triconsonantal root, which is a sequence of three consonants representing the most basic and abstract form of a word.
www.ancientscripts.com /akkadian.html   (1201 words)

  
 Sumerian Language & Writing
The Sumerian language is generally regarded as a language isolate in linguistics because it belongs to no known language family; Akkadian belongs to the Afro-Asiatic languages.
Sumerian, the oldest known written language in human history, was spoken in Mesopotamia (modern Iraq and peripheral regions) throughout the third millennium BC and survived as an esoteric written language until the death of the cuneiform tradition around the time of Christ.
In an ergative language the subject of a sentence with a direct object is in the so-called ergative case, which in Sumerian is marked with the suffix -e.
www.crystalinks.com /sumerlanguage.html   (911 words)

  
 Akkadian Empire
Semites [whether Akkadians or a Semitic language group that had settled before them] may have had a part in the urbanization that took place at the end of the 4th millennium.
Akkadian tradition itself saw it in this light, however, and a learned treatise of the late 8th or the 7th century lists no fewer than 65 cities and lands belonging to that empire.
The so-called Old Akkadian manner of writing is extraordinarily appealing from the aesthetic point of view; as late as the Old Babylonian era it served as a model for monumental inscriptions.
www.angelfire.com /nt/Gilgamesh/akkadian.html   (1367 words)

  
 Akkadian language
Semitic language, which served as the common language of peoples of the Middle East for about 300 years, from the 9th century until the 7th century BCE when Aramaic started to supplant it.
The language was in use for 2,500 years in and around Mesopotamia.
Akkadian was written in a cuneiform script, with about 600 different signs for either words or syllables.
www.i-cias.com /e.o/akkadn.htm   (181 words)

  
 Yamada Language Center: Language Guides
The Yamada Language Guides are the definitive guide to language resources on the World Wide Web.
There are 112 fonts in our archives, for 40 languages.
This page is maintained by the Yamada Language Center at the University of Oregon.
babel.uoregon.edu /yamada/guides.html   (116 words)

  
 Internet Ancient History Sourcebook: Mesopotamia
The Advice of an Akkadian Father to His Son, c.
The tablets, written in a Canaanite language (Eblaite), date from c.2500 BCE.
There are a number of problems in the various proposed chronologies of ancient Mediterranean cultures.
www.fordham.edu /halsall/ancient/asbook03.html   (1275 words)

  
 Awilum.com » Akkadian Dialectal Overview from Von Soden’s GAG
To a large degree, the literary language preserves archaic spellings; this is particularly true for the hymn-epic dialect of many poems.
There is substantial variation in the language of the letters and economic documents than in the substantial literature of the first half of the first millennium, which even with the increasing decline of the inflected endings there is a testimony of conscious attention to language in the schools.
Neo-Babylonian (Neubabylonische nB) is the living language most seen in the letters and economic documents of the time from around 1000 to the end of the Assyrian period (around 625).
awilum.com /?p=329   (723 words)

  
 Definition of Akkadian language
Akkadian was a language of the Semitic family spoken in ancient Mesopotamia, particularly by the Assyrians and Babylonians.
Cuneiform was in many ways unsuited to Akkadian: among its flaws were its inability to represent glottal stops, pharyngeal stops, and emphatic consonants, as well as a syllabic construction completely inappropriate for languages demonstrating the triconsonantal root.
Akkadian was an inflected language, possessing two genders (masculine and feminine), three cases (nominative, accusative, and genitive), three numbers (singular, dual, and plural), and verb conjugations for first, second, and third persons.
www.wordiq.com /definition/Akkadian_language   (367 words)

  
 Semitic Languages (and the Phoenician language)
Ancient languages spoken by non-Arab population of these many Middle Easter countries continue to survive in the dialects/languages of everyday life and the roots of the older languages of the Phoenician, Aramaic, Syriac, Assyrian, Coptic...etc. are still evident.
As spoken languages, they were succeeded by Aramaic in the 6th century BC, but as a literary language Akkadian survived approximately until the beginning of the Christian era.
Ancient languages spoken by non-Arab population of these countries continue to survive in the dialects/languages of everyday life and the roots of the older languages of the Phoenician, Aramaic, Syriac, Assyrian, Coptic...etc. are still evident.
phoenicia.org /semlang.html   (2757 words)

  
 Akkadian Language and Literature - Search Results - MSN Encarta   (Site not responding. Last check: )
Akkadian Language and Literature, extinct Semitic language, and the texts written in it, of the ancient region of Akkad (Sumer).
Sumer : language and literature : Akkadian language: Assyro-Babylonian Language
At the time of the breakup of the empire of Sumer and Akkad, about 1950 bc, the Akkadian language was in general use throughout Mesopotamia and had...
encarta.msn.com /Akkadian_Language_and_Literature.html   (227 words)

  
 Akkadian Words in Modern Assyrian
The ancient Assyrian language is classified as Akkadian; it was the language of the Assyrians and Babylonians, written in Cuneiform.
Gradually it was accepted as the the ecclesiastical and cultural language of the Aramaic speaking Christians of the region.
For example, in Akkadian the word for weapons is keke (literally: teeth, because weapons were cutting instruments), in liturgical Syriac the word for weapons is zaineh, while in modern Eastern Assyrian it is cheke, the same as in Akkadian.
www.aina.org /articles/akkadianwords.html   (766 words)

  
 Akkadian language
Semitic language, which served as the common language of peoples of the Middle East for about 300 years, from the 9th century until the 7th century BCE when Aramaic started to supplant it.
The language was in use for 2,500 years in and around Mesopotamia.
Akkadian was written in a cuneiform script, with about 600 different signs for either words or syllables.
lexicorient.com /e.o/akkadn.htm   (181 words)

  
 Akkadia - Crystalinks
Akkad gave its name to the Akkadian language, reflecting use of akkadรป ("in the language of Akkad") in the Old Babylonian period to denote the Semitic version of a Sumerian text.
The Sumerians and the Akkadian cultures formed the principle elements in the population of Mesopotamia before the beginning of recorded history and in the millennium thereafter (the 3rd millennium BCE - c.2350-2200 BCE).
Akkadian is an inflected language, and as a Semitic language its grammatical features are highly similar to those found in Classical Arabic.
www.crystalinks.com /akkadia.html   (899 words)

  
 WRISYRRE
Some of these dead languages have survived through the medium of writing in a few parts of the globe, and the largest such cluster comes to us from Western Asia and North Africa, where millennia ago a variety of scripts were used for preserving messages on clay, papyrus, and stone.
More interestingly, however, one could claim that the two languages were intermingled; the main protocol of the juridical proceedings was redacted in Sumerian, and the testimony of the main witness, registered as direct speech, was written down in the language in which it was given, that is, in Akkadian.
As a general rule, Akkadian literary texts from the second millennium are primarily syllabic, but in the first millennium we find an increased use of logographic writing as well as the development of new syllabic repertoires, so that the number of signs used increased dramatically.
www-personal.umich.edu /~piotrm/WRISYRRE.htm   (4389 words)

  
 AllRefer.com - Akkadian (Language And Linguistics) - Encyclopedia   (Site not responding. Last check: )
Akkadian[ukA´dEun] Pronunciation Key, extinct language belonging to the East Semitic subdivision of the Semitic subfamily of the Afroasiatic family of languages (see Afroasiatic languages).
Thereafter, Akkadian evolved into two dialects, Assyrian, the tongue of ancient Assyria, and Babylonian, the language of ancient Babylonia.
Unlike the other Semitic languages, which employed an alphabetic writing system, Akkadian and its later forms, Assyrian and Babylonian, were written in cuneiform.
reference.allrefer.com /encyclopedia/A/Akkadian.html   (377 words)

Try your search on: Qwika (all wikis)

Factbites
  About us   |   Why use us?   |   Reviews   |   Press   |   Contact us  
Copyright © 2005-2007 www.factbites.com Usage implies agreement with terms.