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Topic: Alain Locke


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  Alain Leroy Locke
Locke returned to the United States in 1911, and in 1912 joined the faculty of Howard University as a professor of philosophy and English, a position he held for the rest of his life.
Locke also became a scholar on fl folk music, and even as he pointed out African influences on African American music, he was also among the earliest critics to argue for African American music's importance to American music as a whole.
Locke made a career of thinking about fl culture in innovative ways, and in the process, he became one of the most important fl intellectual leaders of the twentieth century.
archive.blackvoices.com /research/encarta/tt_164.asp   (1113 words)

  
 Alain Locke
Locke takes the position that value relativism is an extension of the observable fact that different cultures have different values and understandings of the world.
Chief among the responsibilities and possibilities of adult education in the Negro community is the advancement of group solidarity and the improvement of the "attitudinal" outlook of Negroes away from a condition of depression and dependence to a condition of hope and possibility.
Locke argues that group solidarity and uplift of morale is as important as the improvement of general knowledge and skill for Negro adult education.
www.nl.edu /academics/cas/ace/resources/alainlocke.cfm   (1707 words)

  
 Terrance MacMullan   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-10-23)
Locke argues that a trans-cultural communication of aesthetic values is vital for culturally diverse democratic societies for whom cross-cultural exchange and understanding is necessary in order to avoid conflict among different cultural groups.
Locke sees himself as carrying on James’ fight by concretizing the “vital connection between pluralism and democracy” that is hinted at in the older pragmatist’s work.
Locke urges us to walk a difficult line regarding education; on the one hand fostering in a deep love of her cultural heritage while at the same time making her see that while her culture is the most meaningful for her, it is still only one of many that deserves respect.
www.american-philosophy.org /archives/2005_conference/final_papers/macmullan.htm   (4475 words)

  
 Alain Locke's Sociocultural Conception of Race
I turn now to examine Alain Locke’s conception of race to correct Appiah’s unwarranted and premature ejection of race from what he considers to be the rigorous domain of formal analysis.
One central theme in Locke’s thinking, a theme articulated within the context of his axiological view and that extends to other areas of inquiry, is the idea that sociocultural concepts need not correspond to an independently existing reality in order to acquire validity within the context of human life.
Alain Locke, "The Concept of Race as Applied to Social Culture," in Leonard Harris, ed., The Philosophy of Alain Locke: Harlem Renaissance and Beyond, (1989), p.
www.apa.udel.edu /apa/archive/newsletters/v96n2/black/alain.asp   (3258 words)

  
 Alain Locke - The Black Renaissance in Washington, DC   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-10-23)
Locke entered Harvard in 1904 and graduated in 1907 with a distinguished academic record (magna cum laude), and became a member of Phi Beta Kappa.
Locke returned to Howard University in 1918 as Professor of Philosophy and remained at the University until he retired in 1952.
“…Alain Locke believed that the profound changes in the American Negro had to do with the freeing of himself from the fictions of his past and the rediscovery of himself.
www.dclibrary.org /blkren/bios/lockea.html   (1191 words)

  
 Global Mappings: Alain Locke
Alain Leroy Locke was born in Philadelphia on September 13, 1885.
Alain Locke is closely associated with the Harlem Renaissance and the idea of the 'New Negro.' He edited a book entitled The New Negro in 1925 (which started life as a special issue of Survey Graphic, a magazine of sociology) that featured many of the rising stars of the Harlem Renaissance.
Locke was a strong proponent of the study of African art, for its cultural as well as its artistic implications.
diaspora.northwestern.edu /mbin/WebObjects/DiasporaX.woa/wa/displayArticle?atomid=605   (463 words)

  
 APA Newsletters 98:1 - Alain Locke and the Language of World Solidarity
Locke hoped that artists could achieve the world peace or common civilization that politicians were unable to bring about, and, in the words of Eugene Holmes, "that the reciprocity and tolerance which might emerge once there was a genuine sense of value-sharing would lead to integration in a real direction" (Holmes 1957, 118).
Depending on the interpretation one takes of Locke’s dichotomy between the cultural and the social or political, the effects might be a cultural world solidarity but a dominant political body drawing on a single linguistic culture (in other words, a bifurcated existence), or perhaps an elaborate cultural-linguistic stance that requires political implementation of multilingual institutions.
To explicate this paradox, Locke introduced the distinction between "involuntary segregation" and "voluntary exclusiveness." As Washington explains, "Involuntary segregation is the result of certain practices and policies, usually maliciously imposed by the dominant group on its minority group, to oppress members of the minority group.
www.apa.udel.edu /apa/archive/newsletters/v98n1/black/scholz.asp   (3311 words)

  
 Alain Locke
Alain, their only child, was born in 1886 and nurtured in an urbane, cultivated home environment.
Locke became one of the leading members of the Howard faculty as well as a major inspiration to the student body and the growing national African American self-awareness movement of the 1920s.
Locke retired later that year and was awarded an honorary doctorate by Howard, a rare expression of esteem for a faculty member.
www.africawithin.com /bios/alain_locke.htm   (2741 words)

  
 PAL: Alain LeRoy Locke (1886-1954)   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-10-23)
Locke was a self-confessed "philosophical midwife" to a generation of fl artists and writers.
Locke was also a leading figure in the adult education movement of the 1930s.
McLeod, A. "Claude McKay, Alain Locke, and the Harlem Renaissance." Half-Yearly Literary.
www.csustan.edu /english/reuben/pal/chap9/locke.html   (779 words)

  
 Howard University Libraries -
LAIN LEROY LOCKE was born in Philadelphia on September 13, 1886 to Pliny Ishmael Locke and Mary Hawkins Locke.
Locke was the architect of the New Negro Movement and the Harlem Renaissance, the focus of which was the promotion of fl art and culture.
The National Conference on Philosophy and Race is a celebration of Locke's life and contributions to philosophy in general, and Africana philosophy in particular on the 80th anniversary of his receipt of the Ph.D. degree in philosophy from Harvard.
www.founders.howard.edu /locke.htm   (1443 words)

  
 Alain LeRoy Locke
Alain Locke contributed significantly to the twentieth-century dialogue on ethics and society.
Drawing particularly on the work of William James and Josiah Royce, Locke was perhaps the first to bring philosophy to bear on the problems of race relations and social justice in a multiracial society.
Alain LeRoy Locke was born on Sept. 13, 1886, in Philadelphia PA. He was an American educator, writer, and philosopher, who is best remembered as a leader and chief interpreter of the Harlem Renaissance.
www.queertheory.com /histories/l/locke_alain_leroy.htm   (900 words)

  
 Harmon Collection   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-10-23)
An interpreter of fl cultural achievements, Alain Locke s recognized as the authority on his race's contributions to the humanities.
Locke served as an adviser to the Harmon Foundation, assisting in identifying subjects for its portrait collection and outlining strategies for promoting the collection's exhibition.
According to Mary Beattie Brady, director of the Harmon Foundation, Locke was purposefully depicted in his "Oxford jacket" to represent him as a quiet, dignified scholar.
www.npg.si.edu /exh/harmon/lockharm.htm   (247 words)

  
 Alain Locke (1885-1954)
One particular point of interest is Locke's own educational background; students want to know what it was like for an African-American at Oxford, and they are also generally interested in learning about the milieu at Harvard in the early 1900s.
Perhaps not without irony, Locke humbly referred to himself as the "midwife" of a generation of writers and artists who would be responsible for Harlem's renaissance.
Locke's essay works well alongside Du Bois's "Of Our Spiritual Strivings" (chapter I of The Souls of Black Folk); Langston Hughes's "When the Negro Was in Vogue"; Johnson's The Autobiography of an ex-colored Man.
www.georgetown.edu /faculty/bassr/heath/syllabuild/iguide/locke.html   (1130 words)

  
 African American Registry: Alain Locke, philosopher of 1920's Harlem
That same year Locke became the first African American to be awarded a Rhodes Scholarship, which he used to further study philosophy at Oxford University and the University of Berlin.
Alain Locke's best-remembered accomplishments come from his scholarship on literature and art.
Locke also became a scholar on fl folk music, and was also among the earliest critics to argue for African American music's importance to American music as a whole.
www.aaregistry.com /african_american_history/354/Alain_Locke_philosopher_of__1920s_Harlem   (468 words)

  
 [No title]
Alain Leroy Locke was born in 1886 during the post-reconstruction era and died in 1954, a month before the Brown v.
Locke taught at Howard University in Washington, DC, for nearly 40 years.
Locke's books stressed fl culture, but he always tried to show how this fitted into the whole of American life.
www-distance.syr.edu /pvitaal.html   (610 words)

  
 Directory - Society: Philosophy: Philosophers: L: Locke, Alain
Alain Locke: The Black Renaissance in Washington, DC  · cached · Article, with bibliography, on this thinker's influence on the New Negro movement and the Harlem Renaissance.
Alain Locke Correspondence  · cached · Background information for an exhibit on the composer William Grant Still.
Alain Locke and the Language of World Solidarity  · cached · A 1998 paper by Sally J. Scholz.
www.incywincy.com /default?p=1162015   (213 words)

  
 Explore DC: Alain Locke
Alain Le Roy Locke was a widely recognized teacher, editor, and author.
Locke was a professor of philosophy at Howard University from 1918 to 1953.
Locke published several anthologies featuring the literary work of African-Americans, as well as books, essays, and reviews that were influential in defining African-Americans' distinctive traditions and culture and the role they might play in bringing fls into mainstream American society.
www.exploredc.org /index.php?id=18&base13   (103 words)

  
 Alain Locke's New Negro
Alain Locke’s essay “The New Negro” was absolutely necessary because it completed its objective of defining the New Negro and its role in those days’ society.
Although Alain Locke’s essay thoroughly catches the spirit of the Harlem Renaissance, it does not tell the whole truth about the life of African Americans.
Prejudice, violence, death, suicidal behavior and poverty were present and are still part of the their life, but Alain Locke’s essay did not describe any of them.
www.geocities.com /SouthBeach/Cove/6831/negro.html   (814 words)

  
 Alain LeRoy Locke
Locke was the first fl Rhodes scholar, studying at Oxford (1907-10) and the University of Berlin (1910-11).
Locke stimulated and guided artistic activities and promoted the recognition and respect of fls by the total American community.
Alain Locke passed away on June 9, 1954, in New York City.
members.aol.com /klove01/leroylck.htm   (371 words)

  
 Society Philosophy Philosophers L Locke, Alain   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-10-23)
Alain Locke: The Black Renaissance in Washington, DC - Article, with bibliography, on this thinker's influence on the New Negro movement and the Harlem Renaissance.
Alain Locke and the Language of World Solidarity - A 1998 paper by Sally J. Scholz.
Alain Locke Correspondence - Background information for an exhibit on the composer William Grant Still.
www.iper1.com /iper1-odp/scat/id/Society/Philosophy/Philosophers/L/Locke,_Alain   (242 words)

  
 Amazon.com: The Critical Pragmatism of Alain Locke: Books: Leonard Harris   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-10-23)
It aims to capture the radical implications of Locke's approach within pragmatism, the critical temper embedded in Locke's works, the central role of power and empowerment of the oppressed, and the concept of broad democracy Locke employed.
Arguing that the school of thought Locke initiated is best described as "critical pragmatism", the well-known philosopher and Locke scholar, Leonard Harris, provides a clear and thorough introduction to Locke's thought that will be useful to students and scholars alike.
Locke's critical pragmatism arguably avoids the pitfalls of critical theory, anticipates its tremendous contribution to human liberation, and offers an alternative to the limitations of classical pragmatism.
www.amazon.com /exec/obidos/tg/detail/-/0847688070?v=glance   (549 words)

  
 ALLS: Alain Leroy Locke Society
Alain Leroy Locke was born in Philadelphia on September 13, 1886 to Pliny Ishmael Locke and Mary Hawkins Locke.
The National Conference on Philosophy and Race is a celebration of Locke's life and contributions to philosophy in general, and African philosophy in particular on the 80th anniversary of his receipt of the Ph.D. degree in philosophy from Harvard.
Locke contended that "the moral imperatives of a new world order are an internationally limited idea of national sovereignty, a non-monopolistic and culturally tolerant concept of race and religious loyalties freed of sectarian bigotry."
www.alainlocke.com   (1876 words)

  
 Alain Locke
In addition to his long list of academic honors, Locke is credited with helping to initiate and propel the Harlem Renaissance.
Locke graduated from Harvard University in 1907 and became the first fl Rhodes scholar.
Locke developed a strong interest in African culture and began encouraging fl artists and musicians in America to explore their African roots through their work.
www.factmonster.com /ipka/A0800599.html   (154 words)

  
 philosophy: philosophers: l: locke-alain Spirit And Sky
Alain Locke and the Language of World Solidarity
Alain Locke: The Black Renaissance in Washington, DC
Locke's article from the 1925 Survey Graphic Harlem Number.
www.spiritandsky.com /philosophy/philosophers/l/locke-alain   (187 words)

  
 Alain Locke Biography / Biography of Alain Locke Main Biography
Locke was born into a prominent Philadelphia family in 1886.
His grandfather, Ishmael Locke, was a free African American and teacher.
Each Biography is written by a biographical expert or professional educator and is a complete resource on the individual.
www.bookrags.com /biography-alain-locke   (235 words)

  
 The New Negro
"In a 1925 essay entitled 'The New Negro', Howard University Professor of Philosophy Alain Locke described this transformation as not relying on older time-worn models but, rather, embracing a 'new psychology' and 'new sprit'.
Central to Locke's prescription was the mandate that the 'New Negro' had to 'smash' all of the racial, social and psychological impediments that had long obstructed fl achievement.
Six years prior to Locke's essay, the pioneering fl film maker Oscar Micheaux called for similar changes.
www.iniva.org /harlem/negro.html   (450 words)

  
 Inventory of the James Frank Harrison Family Collection
He maintained a correspondence with the Black philosopher, Alain Locke, during the 1930's and 40's and there are 2 boxes of correspondence from him.
Correspondence - Alain Locke to J. Frank Harrison, Jr., Oct. 9, 1928 and Nov.
Correspondence - Alain Locke to J. Frank Harrison, Jr., Aug. 19, 1931 and Sept.
dlg.galileo.usg.edu /aafa/html/aafa_aarl89-003.html   (2881 words)

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