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Topic: Alemannic


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In the News (Mon 18 Mar 19)

  
  Alemannic German - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
Alemannic German (Alemannisch) is a group of dialects of the Upper German branch of the Germanic language family.
Highest Alemannic (in the Canton of Wallis, in the Walser settlements, in the Bernese Oberland and in the German-speaking part of Fribourg).
The conjugation of the verb to be in Alemannic dialects
en.wikipedia.org /wiki/Alemannic_German   (496 words)

  
 Swiss German - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-11-07)
Occasionally, the Alemannic dialects spoken in other countries are called Swiss German as well, especially the dialects of Liechtenstein which is closely associated to Switzerland.
Swiss German is intelligible to speakers of other Alemannic dialects, but usually not intelligible to speakers of Standard German (which includes French- or Italian-speaking Swiss who learn Standard German at school).
As such, even though the Alemannic dialects belong to High German, their vowels are closer to Low German than other High German dialects or standard German.
www.pineville.us /project/wikipedia/index.php/Swiss_German   (1810 words)

  
 Articles - Alemannic Separatism   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-11-07)
Alemannic Separatism is a political movement advocating the unification of the Alemannic speech areas northeast of the Rhine and Lake Constance with Switzerland.
Historically, Alemannic Separatism was a political movement during the early 19th Century and the time after the two world wars; whereas the contemporary Alemannic Separatism is no organized political movement, but an occasionally found attitude among the Alemannic-speaking population northeast of the Rhine and Lake Constance.
Therefore, Alemannic separatism is often seen as a threat to Switzerland as it is. Furthermore, the Swiss Germans usually define themselves in opposition to Germany, no matter whether it's Alemannic Germany or not.
www.lastring.com /articles/Alemannic_Separatism?mySession=9635e147b84a159d6caf9739996708f2   (495 words)

  
 GERMAN LANGUAGE - LoveToKnow Article on GERMAN LANGUAGE   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-11-07)
The Alemannic dialect which, roughly speaking, is separated from Bavarian by the Lech and borders on Italian territory in the south and on French in the west, is subdivided into: (a) Swabian, the dialect of the kingdom of Wurttemberg and the north-western part of Tirol (cf.
The High Franconian dialects, that is to say, east and south (or south-Rheriish) Franconian, which are separated broadly speaking by the river Neckar, comprise the language spoken in a part of Baden, the dialects of the Main valley from Wurzburg upwards to Bamberg, the dialect of Nuremberg and probably of the Vogtland (Plauen) and Egerland.
It has been already noted that the Alemannic dialect (as well as the archaic poets of the German national epic) retained at least the long unstressed vowels until as late as the 14th century (gemarterol, gekriuzegol, andc.), and Low and Middle German preserved the weakened e sound in many cases where Upper German dropped it.
www.1911encyclopedia.org /G/GE/GERMAN_LANGUAGE.htm   (7834 words)

  
 Alemannic   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-11-07)
Alemannic German is a dialect family in the Upper Germanic branch of the German language.
Alemannic can also refer to the Germanic tribe of the Alemanni.
Alemannic can also be used to refer to the modern German people.
www.sciencedaily.com /encyclopedia/alemannic   (145 words)

  
 Alemannic language biography .ms   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-11-07)
Alemannic (Alemannisch) is an Upper German language of the Germanic language family.
Highest Alemannic or Walser (originally in the Wallis Canton of Switzerland).
The Term "Swiss German" often includes also Walser as a Swiss Alemannic variant.
alemannic-german.biography.ms   (48 words)

  
 Wikipedia: Swiss German
Swiss German is intelligible to speakers of other Alemannic dialects, but usually not intelligible to speakers of Standard German (which includes French or Italian Swiss who learn Standard German at school).
Most Swiss dialects that have initial [k_X] or [X] instead of older [k_h]; there are however exceptions, namely the idioms of Chur and Basel.
Basel German is a mix between High and Low Alemannic (most, but not all, Alemannic dialects spoken in Germany are Low Alemannic), and Chur German is basically High Alemannic without initial [X] or [k_X].
www.factbook.org /wikipedia/en/s/sw/swiss_german.html   (872 words)

  
 Old Heidelberg: Events, Carnival (Fasching) around Germany
If carnival celebrations in big cites are for tourists, TV and the public at large, the Alemannic fasnacht has remained a kind of mirror of the local people.
Each of the little Alemannic towns of the Black Forest region has created its own varied carnival life.
The so-called race of fools started in the pretty Alemannic town in the 16th century, but then became forgot­ten.
www.oldheidelberg.com /events/CarnivalGermany.html   (416 words)

  
 NephereX   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-11-07)
Early 2004, "Under the Alemannic Sun" saw the light of day; a split demo-CD with the Flemish underground project Gorath.
Hailed by underground fans and dreaded by fl metal purists, "Under the Alemannic Sun" embodies the spirit of a time when blazing churches illuminated the night sky.
The tracks on "Wurðiz" were recorded during and shortly after the "Under the Alemannic Sun" sessions.
users.skynet.be /nepherex/bands_theudho.htm   (177 words)

  
 Alsatian language   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-11-07)
Alsatian (French Alsacien, German Elsässerdeutsch) is a German Alemannic dialect.
Spoken in Alsace, a region in France and subsequently heavily influenced by French.
Though not readily intelligible to speakers of standard German, it is closely related to other nearby Alemannic dialects, such as Swiss German or Swabian[?].
www.city-search.org /al/alsatian-language.html   (282 words)

  
 [No title]
In the towns and villages of the Alpine areas of Austria, Southern Germany, the Black Forest, the area around Lake Constance, and in German-speaking France and Switzerland, wherever Alemannic tribes had settled, "Fasnet" (Fasnacht) is celebrated.
Typical of the Alemannic Fasnet is the use of elaborate, beautifully carved wooden masks.
Recurring over and over are representations of the "Wise Fool" with smooth, serene, pale faces, scary witches with grotesque features and animal masks of all kinds, and masks of mythological characters that figure in local lore and history.
www.serve.com /shea/germusa/fasnet.htm   (652 words)

  
 Worldroots.com   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-11-07)
A Roman road (connecting Rottenburg and Koengen) ran along the left bank of the Ammer through wht is now the town.
6th/7th century The ending *ingen* indicates that Tuebingen is one of the Alemannic settlements whose name is derived from that of a person: Tuwo, Tubo, Tuo or Tugo.
In the area of the present-day Muenzgasse there is an Alemannic cemetry with a linear arrangement of graves containing objects from the first half of the 7th century.
worldroots.com /brigitte/tuebing.htm   (1931 words)

  
 Welcome to the LOT pages   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-11-07)
Since the particle “zu” plays in important role in many theories about the structure of infinitivals, Alemannic is an interesting testing ground those theories which take “zu” as representing a functional projection (either T or C) in the infinitival clause.
This is a construction very specific to Alemannic in that it shows a different form of the infinite verb and in that it occurs only in highly restricted contexts.
I will discuss several possibilities how this construction could be treated, especially under consideration of the fact that gi is also used as a preposition in some (sub)-dialects of Alemannic (stemming from the preposition gegen short form gen), whereas others exclusively use in the context of motion verbs.
www.let.uu.nl /LOT/News&Events/Newsletters/2004/2004-04-23.html   (1564 words)

  
 Upper German languages biography .ms   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-11-07)
Upper German is a family of High German languages spoken primarily in southern Germany, Austria, Switzerland and Northern Italy.
Upper German languages can be generally classified as Alemannic or Austro-Bavarian.
However, there are several dialects or languages in these two groups besides the more standard versions of Alemannic and Austro-Bavarian.
upper-german.biography.ms   (83 words)

  
 Articles - Highest Alemannic German   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-11-07)
Highest Alemannic is a branch of Alemannic dialects and belongs to the German language, even though they are not intelligible to German speakers.
Highest Alemannic dialects are spoken in alpine regions of Switzerland: In the Bernese Oberland, in the German-speaking parts of the Canton of Fribourg, in the Valais (see Walliser German) and in the Walser settlements (mostly in Switzerland but also in Italy and in Austria; see Walser German).
There are High Alemannic dialects that have preserved the ending -n which has been dropped in most Upper German dialects.
gaple.com /articles/Highest_Alemannic?mySession=f7c40c675830578c4726...   (346 words)

  
 Articles - High Alemannic German   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-11-07)
High Alemannic is a branch of Alemannic dialects and belongs to the German language, even though they are only partly intelligible to German speakers.
The High Alemannic dialects are spoken in Liechtenstein and in most of German-speaking Switzerland (for instance Bernese German or Zürich German) except for the Highest Alemannic dialects in the South and for the Low Alemannic Basel German dialect in the North West.
Therefore, High Alemannic must not be confused with Swiss German, which refers to all German dialects of Switzerland because of the special diglossic situation of German-speaking Switzerland.
gaple.com /articles/High_Alemannic?mySession=f7c40c675830578c4726890...   (276 words)

  
 Alemannic - yourDictionary.com - American Heritage Dictionary   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-11-07)
A group of High German dialects spoken in Alsace, Switzerland, and parts of southern Germany.
Of or relating to the Alemannic dialects of High German.
Of or relating to the Alemanni or their language.
www.yourdictionary.com /ahd/a/a0189100.html   (45 words)

  
 Swiss German language --  Encyclopædia Britannica
German Schweizer Deutsch, Swiss German Schwyzertütsch, collective name for the great variety of Alemannic (Upper German) dialects spoken in Switzerland north of the boundary between the Romance and Germanic languages, in Liechtenstein, in the Austrian province of Vorarlberg, and in parts of Baden-Württemberg in Germany and Alsace in France.
A few isolated villages south of the Alps in Italy also speak Alemannic dialects.
collective name for the great variety of Alemannic (Upper German) dialects spoken in Switzerland north of the boundary between the Romance and Germanic languages, in Liechtenstein, in the Austrian province of Vorarlberg, and in parts of Baden-Württemberg in Germany and Alsace in France.
www.britannica.com /eb/article-9070667?tocId=9070667   (999 words)

  
 D'Alsace en Lorraine
Alsatian is an Alemannic dialect that derives from Upper German (Oberdeutsch).
You have to imagine that Germany is a federal nation that has as many dialects as there are regions or "Länder": bavarian, lower saxon, frisian, berlinish, etc. Alemannic was the language used by the Alamans (or Alemanni) who occupied the region as soon as the fourth century.
In the north of the departement of Moselle, in Luxembourg, in Saarland, in Rhineland-Palatinate and in northern Alsace (Hilly Alsace and Wissembourg area), dialects do not derive from Alemannic, but from Franconian.
www.robert-weinland.org /dialec.php?lang=en   (323 words)

  
 [No title]
The Alsatian dialects (there are some minor regional differences) belong to the Alemannic dialect group, which most of Baden-Wurttemberg (roughly south of a line Karlsruhe-Augsburg), Vorarlberg in Austria and Liechtenstein.
In these respects (and some others), the vowel system of Low Alemannic retains features of classical Middle High German, but it also exhibits quite a few innovations.
Manchester: Manchester Univ. Press, 116-160 [dialect of Barr, sample text in dialect of Strasbourg] Philipp, Martha & Bothorel-Witz, Arlette (1990), "Low Alemannic," in: Russ, Charles V. (ed.), The Dialects of Modern German, London: Routledge, 313-336 [dialect of Colmar] A few years ago, a large Alsatian-French dictionary was published but I don't remember the title.
shakti.trincoll.edu /~mendele/vol07/vol07.064   (1591 words)

  
 Alsatian language, alphabet and pronunciation
Alsatian is a German Alemannic dialect spoken in Alsace, a region in eastern France which has passed between French and German control many times during its history.
There is limited usage Alsatian in the media: one radio station, Radio France Alsace, broadcasts in Alsatian and other radio and TV stations broadcast some programs in the dialect.
Alsatian is not easily intelligible to speakers of standard German, but is closely related to other Alemannic dialects, such as Swiss German and Swabian.
www.omniglot.com /writing/alsatian.htm   (222 words)

  
 GER 471 - Dialects   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-11-07)
General information on German dialects with a map showing the location of the dialects.
A comprehensive introduction to the Alemannic dialect with useful dialect maps.
Scroll down for infomation on the Alemannisch, or Alemannic, dialect in Germany.
web.uvic.ca /geru/471/dialects.htm   (135 words)

  
 Swiss German Morphology and Lexicon
Almost all of the dialects grouped under the heading of Swiss German are of the High Alemannic variety of German, although the dialect in the city of Basel is generally considered to be Low Alemannic.
Thus the High Alemannic dialects have a rather homogeneous phonology as compared to the rest of the German language.
Several interesting phonological features occur in Schwyzertütsch, and are in many ways characteristic of the Alemannic dialects in general.
www.nthuleen.com /papers/130paper2.html   (3405 words)

  
 DIALECTS AND HIGH GERMAN
In the southern part of the German-speaking area, e.g., the Alemanni had settled in what today is: Alsace, Baden, Württemberg, western Bavaria, western Austria, Liechtenstein and two thirds of Switzerland.
Even after 1500 years, the overarching Alemannic dialect base still makes it possible for people in these areas to communicate in their respective subdialects.
I suppose it is a bit hard for Austrians to swallow the linguistic designation "südbayerisch" (south Bavarian) for their dialects.
www.serve.com /shea/germusa/dialects.htm   (1177 words)

  
 LUGBURZ.be > The Torture Tower > Interviews > Theudho > Interrogation   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-11-07)
A lot of inspiration for "Under the Alemannic Sun" was found during some trips to Germany.
Not far from that place the Wewelsburg is located, a castle that was meant to be the centre of the German empire according to some weird occultists.
The sound quality of " Under the Alemannic sun" is IMHO better than on your first album " Dies natalis solis invicti".
www.dma.be /p/lugburz/torture/interviews/theudho1.htm   (1592 words)

  
 Swiss German language biography .ms   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-11-07)
Swiss German (Schweizerdeutsch, Schwyzerdütsch, Schwiizerdütsch, Schwyzertütsch) is any of the Alemannic dialects spoken in Switzerland.
Swiss German is intelligible to speakers of other Alemannic dialects, but — unlike Austrian German — usually not intelligible to speakers of Standard German (which includes French- or Italian-speaking Swiss who learn Standard German at school).
The Alternative Swiss German Dictionary A site with all the words you will not find elsewhere.
swiss-german.biography.ms   (1075 words)

  
 Alemannic German   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-11-07)
Alemannic is an Upper German dialect family of the German language.
Swiss German (mostly in Switzerland), also called High Alemannic (the other dialects listed here are Low Alemannic).
Walser (originally in the Wallis Canton of Switzerland)
www.sciencedaily.com /encyclopedia/alemannic_german   (100 words)

  
 Irminsul Ættir - Europe
Asatru Organisation with a focus on the reconstruktion of the old alemannic faith!
We follow the way of our alemannic, markomannic, lombard, bavarian and ostrogot forefathers.
We'd like to encourage all swiss or alemannic heathens to contact us.
www.irminsul.org /aw/aweuro.html   (2557 words)

  
 Table of contents for Library of Congress control number 2003015596   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-11-07)
Table of contents for Quantity and prosodic asymmetries in Alemannic : synchronic and diachronic perspectives / by Astrid Kraehenmann.
Bibliographic record and links to related information available from the Library of Congress catalog.
Contents may have variations from the printed book or be incomplete or contain other coding.
www.loc.gov /catdir/toc/ecip046/2003015596.html   (86 words)

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