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Topic: Alexander I of Russia


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  Alexander II of Russia - LoveToKnow 1911
(1818-1881), emperor of Russia, eldest son of Nicholas I., was born on the 29th of April 18 i 8.
Fortunately for Russia the autocratic power was now in the hands of a man who was impressionable enough to be deeply influenced by the spirit of the time, and who had sufficient prudence and practical common-sense to prevent his being carried away by the prevailing excitement into the dangerous region of Utopian dreaming.
Russia required, it was said, not classical scholars, but practical, scientific men, capable of developing her natural resources.
www.1911encyclopedia.org /Alexander_II_of_Russia   (2287 words)

  
 Alexander I of Russia - LoveToKnow 1911
ALEXANDER I. emperor of Russia, son of the grand-duke Paul Petrovich, afterwards Paul and Maria Fedorovna, daughter of Frederick Eugene of Wurttemberg, was born on the 28th of December 1777.
That Alexander's reign, which began with so large a promise of amelioration, ended by riveting still tighter the chains of the Russian people was, however, due less to the corruption and backwardness of Russian life than to the defects of the tsar himself.
Alexander, in fact, who, without being consciously tyrannical, possessed in full measure the tyrant's characteristic distrust of men of ability and independent judgment, lacked also the first requisite for a reforming sovereign: confidence in his people; and it was this want that vitiated such reforms as were actually realized.
www.1911encyclopedia.org /Alexander_I_of_Russia   (0 words)

  
  Alexander II (of Russia) - MSN Encarta
Alexander II (of Russia) (1818-1881), Emperor (tsar) of Russia (1855-1881).
Alexander, born on April 29 (April 17 according to the Old Style, or Julian, calendar then in use in Russia), 1818, was the eldest son of Emperor Nicholas I and the nephew of Alexander I.
Russia achieved military victory in January 1878, but the terms of the Treaty of San Stefano of March 1878, which were very favourable to Russian interests in the Balkans, were largely negated by the Treaty of Berlin (see Congress of Berlin) in July 1878, as a result of diplomatic pressure by the other European powers.
uk.encarta.msn.com /encyclopedia_761552177/Alexander_II_(of_Russia).html   (749 words)

  
 Alexander I of Russia - Biocrawler
Aleksandr Pavlovich Romanov or Tsar Alexander I (The Blessed), (Russian: Александр I Павлович) (December 23, 1777–December 1, 1825), Emperor of Russia (reigned March 23, 1801–December 1, 1825), King of Poland (reigned 1815–1825), son of the Grand Duke Paul Petrovich, afterwards Paul I, and Maria Fedorovna, daughter of the Duke of Württemberg.
For Russia was not ripe for liberty; and Alexander, the disciple of the revolutionist Laharpe, was—as he himself said—but "a happy accident" on the throne of the tsars.
Alexander, indeed, assisted Napoleon in the war of 1809, but he declared plainly that he would not allow the Austrian Empire to be crushed out of existence; and Napoleon complained bitterly of the inactivity of the Russian troops during the campaign.
www.biocrawler.com /encyclopedia/Alexander_I_of_Russia   (0 words)

  
 NationMaster - Encyclopedia: Alexander II of Russia
Alexandra Alexandrovna Romanov, Grand Duchess of Russia (August 30, 1842 - July 10, 1849) was born at Tsarskoe Selo to Alexander II of Russia and Marie of Hesse and by Rhine.
Born in 1818, he was the eldest son of Tsar Nicholas I of Russia and Charlotte of Prussia, daughter of Frederick William III of Prussia and Louise of Mecklenburg-Strelitz.
Alexander II resolved to try the effect of some moderate liberal reforms in an attempt to quell the revolutionary agitation, and for this purpose he instituted a ukase for creating special commissions, composed of high officials and private personages who should prepare reforms in various branches of the administration.
www.nationmaster.com /encyclopedia/Alexander-II-of-Russia   (0 words)

  
  Alexander II of Russia - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
Alexander gave evidence of a kind disposition and a tender-heartedness which were considered out of place in one destined to become a military autocrat.
Fortunately for Russia the autocratic power was now in the hands of a man who was impressionable enough to be deeply influenced by the spirit of the time, and who had sufficient prudence and practicality to prevent his being carried away by the prevailing excitement into the dangerous region of utopian dreaming.
Alexander II resolved to try the effect of some moderate liberal reforms in an attempt to quell the revolutionary agitation, and for this purpose he caused an ukase to be prepared creating special commissions, composed of high officials and private personages who should prepare reforms in various branches of the administration.
en.wikipedia.org /wiki/Alexander_II_of_Russia   (1959 words)

  
 Alexander I of Russia - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
For Russia was not ripe for liberty; and Alexander, the disciple of the revolutionist Laharpe, was—as he himself said—but "a happy accident" on the throne of the tsars.
Alexander, in fact, who, without being consciously tyrannical, possessed in full measure the tyrant's characteristic distrust of men of ability and independent judgment, lacked also the first requisite for a reforming sovereign: confidence in his people; and it was this want that vitiated such reforms as were actually realized.
Alexander, indeed, assisted Napoleon in the war of 1809, but he declared plainly that he would not allow the Austrian Empire to be crushed out of existence; and Napoleon complained bitterly of the inactivity of the Russian troops during the campaign.
en.wikipedia.org /wiki/Alexander_I_of_Russia   (3817 words)

  
 Alexander III of Russia - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia   (Site not responding. Last check: )
Alexander Alexandrovich Romanov or Alexander III (Russian: Александр III Александрович) (March 10, 1845 – November 1, 1894) was the Tsar of Russia from March 14, 1881 until his death on November 1, 1894.
Alexander was the second son of Alexander II and Marie of Hesse and by Rhine.
Alexander II had lost much of the reforming zeal which distinguished the first decade of his reign, and had no longer the energy required to undertake the task suggested to him.
www.secaucus.us /project/wikipedia/index.php/Alexander_III_of_Russia   (1760 words)

  
 Alexander I of Russia
Aleksandr Pavlovich Romanov or Tsar Alexander I (The Blessed), (Александр I Павлович) (1777 - 1825), Emperor of Russia (reigned 1801 - 1825), son of the Grand Duke Paul Petrovich, afterwards Paul I of Russia, and Maria Fedorovna, daughter of Frederick Eugene of Württemberg was born on December 28, 1777.
A party too in Russia itself, headed by the tsar's brother the grand-duke Constantine, was clamorous for peace; but Alexander, after a vain attempt to form a new coalition, summoned the Russian nation to a holy war against Napoleon as the enemy of the orthodox faith.
Alexander, indeed, assisted Napoleon in the war of 1809, but he declared plainly that he would not allow Austria to be crushed out of existence; and Napoleon complained bitterly of the inactivity of the Russian troops during the campaign.
www.sciencedaily.com /encyclopedia/alexander_i_of_russia   (3424 words)

  
 AllRefer.com - Alexander II, czar of Russia (Russian, Soviet, And CIS History, Biography) - Encyclopedia
Alexander II 1818–81, czar of Russia (1855–81), son and successor of Nicholas I.
Prussia's support of Russia during this diplomatic crisis led to a Russo-Prussian rapprochement, and in 1872 the Three Emperors' League was formed by Russia, Prussia, and Austria-Hungary.
Meanwhile, in domestic affairs, Alexander's reforms, while outraging many reactionaries, were regarded as far too moderate by the liberals and radicals.
reference.allrefer.com /encyclopedia/A/Alexand2Rus.html   (528 words)

  
 Alexander I of Russia Summary
Alexander I (1777-1825) was emperor of Russia from 1801 to 1825.
Alexander I succeeded to the throne on March 23rd, 1801, and was crowned in the Kremlin on September 15th of that year.
Russia was not ready for a more liberal society; and Alexander, the disciple of the progressive teacher Laharpe, was—as he himself said—but "a happy accident" on the throne of the tsars.
www.bookrags.com /Alexander_I_of_Russia   (0 words)

  
 Alexander I of Russia -- Facts, Info, and Encyclopedia article   (Site not responding. Last check: )
For Russia was not ripe for (Freedom of choice) liberty; and Alexander, the disciple of the (The overthrow of a government by those who are governed) revolutionist Laharpe, was—as he himself said—but "a happy accident" on the throne of the tsars.
Alexander, in fact, who, without being consciously tyrannical, possessed in full measure the (A cruel and oppressive dictator) tyrant's characteristic distrust of men of ability and independent judgment, lacked also the first requisite for a reforming sovereign: confidence in his people; and it was this want that vitiated such reforms as were actually realized.
But if Alexander suspected Napoleon, Napoleon was no less suspicious of Alexander; and, partly to test his sincerity, he sent an almost peremptory request for the hand of the (The wife of a grand duke or a woman holding that rank in her own right) Grand Duchess Anne, the younger sister of the Tsar.
www.absoluteastronomy.com /encyclopedia/A/Al/Alexander_I_of_Russia.htm   (3240 words)

  
 NationMaster - Encyclopedia: Alexander Palace
The Alexander Palace was constructed in the Imperial retreat of Tsarskoe Selo.
It was commissioned by Catherine the Great for her favorite grandson and future emperor Alexander I of Russia on the occasion of his marriage to Grand Duchess Elizaveeta Akexeevna, born Princess Louise Mary August of Baden.
Alexander I succeeded to the throne on March 23, 1801, and was crowned in the Kremlin on September 15 of that year.
www.nationmaster.com /encyclopedia/Alexander-Palace   (0 words)

  
 Alexander II (of Russia) - MSN Encarta
Alexander II (of Russia) (1818-1881), emperor of Russia (1855-1881), son of Emperor Nicholas I and nephew of Alexander I. He ascended the throne during the Crimean War and in 1856 signed the Treaty of Paris, which brought the hostilities to an end.
After establishing committees to study the need for reform, Alexander II abolished serfdom throughout Russia in 1861.
Alexander was assassinated by a bomb thrown into his carriage by a member of a revolutionary group, the Narodnaya Volya (People's Will).
encarta.msn.com /encyclopedia_761552177/Alexander_II_(of_Russia).html   (0 words)

  
 Alexander II of Russia Biography
Alexander (Aleksandr) II of Russia (Александр II Николаевич) (April 17, 1818—March 13, 1881) was the Emperor (Tsar) of Russia from March 2, 1855 until his assassination.
Fortunately for Russia the autocratic power was now in the hands of a man who was impressionable enough to be deeply influenced by the spirit of the time, and who had sufficient prudence and practicality to prevent his being carried away by the prevailing excitement into the dangerous region of Utopian dreaming.
Alexander II resolved to try the effect of some moderate liberal reforms in an attempt to quell the revolutionary agitation, and for this purpose he caused an ukaz to be prepared creating special commissions, composed of high officials and private personages who should prepare reforms in various branches of the administration.
www.biographybase.com /biography/Alexander_II_of_Russia.html   (1339 words)

  
 Alexander I, czar of Russia. The Columbia Encyclopedia, Sixth Edition. 2001-05
In 1805, Alexander joined the coalition against Napoleon I, but after the Russian defeats at Austerlitz and Friedland he formed an alliance with Napoleon by the Treaty of Tilsit (1807) and joined Napoleon’s Continental System.
Alexander requested M. Speranski to draw up proposals for a constitution, but adopted only one aspect of Speranski’s scheme, an advisory state council, and dismissed him in 1812 to placate the nobility.
Alexander’s religious fervor was partly responsible for the establishment of military colonies, which were agricultural communities run by peasant soldiers.
www.bartleby.com /65/al/Alexand1Rus.html   (475 words)

  
 Russian Alexander II, czar Alexander II of Russia, tsar Alexander II of Russia, Russian Alexander II of russia, ...
Alexander initiated substantial reforms in education, the government, the judiciary, and the military.
Dmitriy Tolstoy, Alexander's minister of internal affairs, instituted the use of land captains, who were noble overseers of districts, and he restricted the power of the zemstva and the dumy.
Alexander III assigned his former tutor, the reactionary Konstantin Pobedonostsev, to be the procurator of the Holy Synod of the Orthodox Church and Ivan Delyanov to be the minister of education.
www.russiansabroad.com /russian_history_38.html   (1003 words)

  
 Alexander II of Russia
Alexander (Aleksandr) II of Russia (April 29, 1818 - March 13, 1881) was the Emperor (Tsar) of Russia from March 2, 1855 until his assassination.
Born the eldest son of Nicholas I of Russia, Alexander's early life gave little indication of his potential, and up to the time of his accession in 1855, few imagined that he would be known to posterity as a great reformer.
Alexander visited England, however, in 1839, and in the years immediately preceding his accession he was entrusted with several missions to the courts of Berlin and Vienna.
www.wordlookup.net /al/alexander-ii-of-russia.html   (2565 words)

  
 Alexander I of Russia Biography
Aleksandr Pavlovich Romanov or Tsar Alexander I (The Blessed), (Александр I Павлович) (1777 - 1825), Emperor of Russia (reigned 1801 - 1825), son of the Grand Duke Paul Petrovich, afterwards Paul I of Russia, and Maria Fedorovna, daughter of Frederick Eugene of Württemberg was born on December 28, 1777.
Russia and France, he urged, were "geographical allies"; there was, and could be, between them no true conflict of interests; together they might rule the world.
But Alexander was still determined "to persist in the system of disinterestedness in respect of all the states of Europe which he had thus far followed," and he again allied himself with Prussia.
www.biographybase.com /biography/Alexander_I_of_Russia.html   (3357 words)

  
 ::Russia of Alexander III::
Russia had a society that was nearly bereft of a typical middle class.
Russia pre-1880 was primarily an agricultural nation with all the social conservatism and superstitions this brought.
Alexander III had an uncompromising view as to the powers that he believed he had as of right of his position.
www.historylearningsite.co.uk /russia_of_alexander_iii.htm   (788 words)

  
 ipedia.com: Alexander I of Russia Article   (Site not responding. Last check: )
Aleksandr Pavlovich Romanov or Tsar Alexander I,, Emperor of Russia, son of the Grand Duke Paul Petrovich, afterwards Paul I of Russia, and Maria Fedorovna, daughter of Frederick Eugene of Württemberg...
Aleksandr Pavlovich Romanov or Tsar Alexander I (The Blessed), (Александр I Павлович) (1777 - 1825), Emperor of Russia (reigned 1801 - 1825), son of the Grand Duke Paul Petrovich, afterwards Paul I of Russia, and Maria Fedorovna, daughter of Frederick Eugene of Württemberg was born on December 28, 1777.
Russia and France, he urged, were "geographical allies"; there was, and could be, between them no true conflict of interests; together they might rule the world.
www.ipedia.com /alexander_i_of_russia.html   (3427 words)

  
 Alexander (Nemolovsky) of Brussels - OrthodoxWiki
Alexander Alexandrovich Nemolovsky was born in the Volhynia Eparchy on August 30, 1876.
In 1921, Alexander participated along with Platon in the ROCOR synod in Karlovtsy, Serbia, where he was confirmed as the primate of the Russian Metropolia in North America.
Alexander served from 1929 until 1960 as Archbishop of Brussels and Belgium, first of the jurisdiction of the Ecumenical Patriarchate of Constantinople (the Russian Orthodox Exarchate in Western Europe) until 1946, then of the Moscow Patriarchate until his death in 1960.
orthodoxwiki.org /Alexander_(Nemolovsky)_of_the_Aleutians   (861 words)

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