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Topic: Algal bloom


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In the News (Wed 17 Jul 19)

  
  Algal bloom Summary
Algal blooms in freshwater lakes and ponds tend to be caused by blue-green and green algae.
An algal bloom is a relatively rapid increase in the population of (usually) phytoplankton algae in an aquatic system.
A widely-used measure of algal and cyanobacterial biomass is the chlorophyll concentration.
www.bookrags.com /Algal_bloom   (1282 words)

  
  Algal Bloom
An algal bloom is a rapid rise in the population of some form of algae.
Algal blooms also are a problem recreational reasons.
Hysteresis is the phenomenon that when a parameter is changed in one direction, the model behavior (not blooming to blooming) changes at one particular value, while changing in the other direction (blooming to not blooming) changes at a different value (usually a very abrupt change).
www1.appstate.edu /~marland/math_bio/algal_bloom.htm   (937 words)

  
  Algal bloom
An algal bloom is a relatively rapid increase in the population of (usually) phytoplankton algae in an aquatic system.
Algal blooms are monitored using biomass measurements coupled with the examination of species present.
A widely-used measure of algal and cyanobacterial biomass is the chlorophyll concentration.
www.xasa.com /wiki/en/wikipedia/a/al/algal_bloom.html   (556 words)

  
 Richardson, TX News: Summer Algae Bloom
A natural occurrence in all surface water supplies, an “algal bloom”, is responsible for the taste and odor changes in the water supply.
Temperature increase – the optimum temperature range of the lake water for an algal bloom to occur is between 80 - 85.
Algal species, such as anabaena, secrete an “oily” substance from their cells that causes an odor in the water supply.
www.cor.net /news/algaebloom.html   (352 words)

  
 Classification of Tropical Algal Bloom Types by Sea Truth Spectral-Radiometric Data
Algal blooms are important ocean biological phenomena which has strong social economic and health impact.
Algal blooms are biological phenomena referring to the situation whereby there is a high cell concentration of phytoplankton.
The bloom was characterised by orange-brown patches with typical dimension 0.5m by 5m.The Trichodesnium count was estimated to be 210,000 cells/l.
www.gisdevelopment.net /aars/acrs/1999/ts5/ts5031pf.htm   (1914 words)

  
 Harmful Algal Blooms Index
Algal blooms occur in both marine and freshwater environments when an algal species outcompetes other species and reproduces rapidly.
A harmful algal bloom (HAB) is a bloom that produces toxins which are detrimental to plants and animals.
ECOHAB - The Ecology and Oceanography of Harmful Algal Blooms
www.tpwd.state.tx.us /hab   (629 words)

  
 MANAGING THE ALGAL BLOOM IN A EUTROPHIC LAKE USING SELECTIVE HERBIVOROUS FISHES - B. B. Jana and S. Datta-Saha1
Algal blooms disturb oxygen balance; secrete toxins of low molecular weight harmful to many aquatic animals and cause gill clogging of some surface feeding fishes.
Such algal blooms in fish ponds are not desirable as they disturb diurnal oxygen balance of the fish ponds and cause gill clogging of some surface feeding fishes.
There are two biomanipulation approaches for controlling algal bloom through fishes; reduction of algal biomass by direct grazing or indirect repression of algal bloom through fish-derived alterations in zooplankton communities and nutrient cycling.
ces.iisc.ernet.in /energy/water/proceed/section2/paper1/section2paper1.htm   (2695 words)

  
 OzEstuaries; Coastal Indicators - Economic Consequences of Algal Blooms
For instance, as a result of algal blooms, fisheries productivity could decrease and/or the visual amenity of an estuary might decline, reducing its value as a tourist destination.
Studies to estimate the cost to the economy of closures of recreational areas due to algal blooms are limited.
However, at a regional level, it is thought that the economic consequences arising from lost coastal tourism and recreational value of an area due to algal blooms may be minimal.
www.ozestuaries.org /indicators/econ_cons_algal_blooms.jsp   (1665 words)

  
 Water - Learning and Living - Algal Blooms
Freshwater algal blooms range in colour from dark green, to yellow, or blue-green in colour and look like scum on the surface of the water.
During summer, periods of limited rainfall, or when river flows are reduced, conditions are ideal for algal blooms to form.
Blue-green algal blooms are a result of excessive nutrients (especially phosphorus) becoming available in the water body, as well as increased sunlight and slow moving water.
www.watercare.net /wll/himp-algalblooms.html   (964 words)

  
 Algal Blooms - Albert Environment
Blue-green blooms are known to occur in relatively undeveloped lakes, and in those lakes with extensive watershed or shoreline development.
Blooms usually develop in nutrient-rich lakes in the summer when the water is warm and slightly to moderately alkaline.
Blooms may not occur every year in a given lake, or they may not develop at the same time each year.
www3.gov.ab.ca /env/water/swq/brochures/algalblooms.html   (785 words)

  
 Algal Bloom Pictures   (Site not responding. Last check: )
This picture shows an algal bloom, where the species of algae releases a pigment (a carotenoid) into the water.
The colouration of such blooms is the source of the term "red tide" which is also sometimes used to describe an algal bloom.
The red pigment is usually released on the death of the bloom as the structure of the algae breaks down and releases the pigment.
www.aquatext.com /images/fish%20etc/algal_bloom_pictures.htm   (66 words)

  
 Center of Excellence for Great Lakes and Human Health - Harmful Algal Bloom Event Response FAQs
Some, such as the blooms of diatoms in the early spring, are very important to the health of the ecosystem.
Some of these blooms are harmless, but when the blooming organisms contain toxins, other noxious chemicals, or pathogens it is known as a harmful algal bloom, or HAB.
Algal blooms can occur at any time of year as long as conditions such as temperature and nutrients are right for growing.
www.glerl.noaa.gov /res/Centers/HABS/faqs.html   (2597 words)

  
 The algal bloom and climate anomalies of 1992   (Site not responding. Last check: )
The algal bloom and climate anomalies of 1992
The periods of high algal pigments and/or high algal counts coincided with unusually coloured seawater which was sufficiently obvious to be noticed by divers, observers in boats and from the cliff-top.
The 'spring blooms' previously reported seem to be variable in amount, timing and composition (between years), but mostly consist of an increase in diatom numbers together with an increase in their proportion of total phytoplankton biomass.
www.seafriends.org.nz /enviro/plankton/bloom92.htm   (3715 words)

  
 Spartanburg SC | GoUpstate.com | Spartanburg Herald-Journal   (Site not responding. Last check: )
Algal blooms may occur in freshwater as well as marine environments.
Some algal blooms are the result of an excess of nutrients (particularly phosphorus and nitrogen) into waters and higher concentrations of these nutrients in water cause increased growth of algae and green plants.
Algal blooms composed of phytoplankters known to naturally produce biotoxins are often called Harmful Algal Blooms, or HABs.
www.goupstate.com /apps/pbcs.dll/section?category=NEWS&template=wiki&text=algal_bloom   (721 words)

  
 Swan River Algal Bloom, February 2000   (Site not responding. Last check: )
A blue-green algal bloom was detected in the Swan River from Maylands to Matilda Bay.
The algal clumps were too dense to stay in the top, fresher part of the water column, and sunk down until they died due to either salinity or lack of light.
As the algal bloom grew, it became thicker and formed a surface scum on parts of the river, washing up on beaches as a thick, bright green scum..
www.wrc.wa.gov.au /srt/Alert/moreinfo.html   (1122 words)

  
 Congressman Vernon J. Ehlers - Press Releases
Harmful algal blooms occur in the waters of every coastal and Great Lakes state and have been responsible for an estimated $1 billion in economic losses over the past few decades, according to officials at the National Ocean Service of the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA).
Harmful algal blooms (HABs) occur in aquatic environments when conditions trigger the rapid growth of plankton that produce toxins detrimental to aquatic life and to humans.
Hypoxia is a condition, created by the decomposition of algal blooms, where oxygen levels are depleted to levels unable to support aquatic life.
www.house.gov /ehlers/press_releases/2003/060503AlgalSubcmte.html   (898 words)

  
 Examples and Exercises / Plumes And Blooms Project
Algal blooms can have varying effects on the marine ecosystem.
Blooms become ecologically harmful by using up all the nutrients, and oxygen in the water.
Algal blooms can also block sunlight from reaching other organisms like kelp.
www.cinms.nos.noaa.gov /pcw2/algal.html   (124 words)

  
 Algal bloom in coastal waters - Highlights — EEA   (Site not responding. Last check: )
More on algal blooms in particular and the problem of eutrophication in general in the EEA report: Eutrophication in Europe's coastal waters.
Harmful algal blooms may cause discoloration of the water, foam formation, oxygen depletion, death of benthic fauna and wild or caged fish, or shellfish poisoning of humans.
More on algal blooms in particular and on eutrophication in general in the EEA report Eutrophication in Europe's coastal waters.
www.eea.eu.int /Highlights/20030811104233/algalbloom   (408 words)

  
 Harmful Algae
Indirect effects of such a bloom often lead to low dissolved oxygen that can affect a broad array of living resources; several fish and shellfish kills were evident in the bloom region under such 2000 bloom conditions.
A bloom of Dinophysis acuminata was detected in the Potomac River during the winter 2001 and resulted in a temporary closure of shellfish waters.
The Coastal Bays experienced macroalgae blooms that concerned citizens about their effects on boating, Pfiesteria and Brown tide blooms occurred, and potentially toxic species of Chattonella, Fibrocapsa and Heterosigma were identified in the region for the first time between 2000 and 2002.
www.dnr.state.md.us /bay/hab   (1013 words)

  
 Bank fishing and algal bloom
The St. John's River Water Management District's algal bloom expert, John Burns, said these cyanobacteria blooms are a problem on the St. John's River, but "At this time, we are not aware of any human health problems associated with [them] or risks due to recreational exposure (such as fishing)."
In extreme cases, excessive algal populations can reduce dissolved oxygen levels in the water to a point where fish kills occur.
So it's a possibility that algal blooms could be a problem and affect the fish you're after, but there haven't been many documented cases of people getting sick from this.
www.ecofloridamag.com /askeditor_algal_bloom.htm   (772 words)

  
 NOAA 200th Feature Story: Toxic Tides: The 2005 New England Harmful Algal Bloom
In May of 2005, NOAA's harmful algal bloom prediction and response capabilities were put to the test when a massive bloom spread along the New England coast.
These blooms occur when algae, simple plants that live in the sea and form the base of the food web, produce toxic or harmful effects on people, fish, shellfish, marine mammals, and birds.
In the summer of 2005, the most severe bloom in over 30 years spread from Maine to Massachusetts, resulting in fishery closures in areas that had not been impacted in previous outbreaks.
celebrating200years.noaa.gov /magazine/nehab/welcome.html   (1177 words)

  
 NOAA's National Ocean Service: Harmful Algal Blooms
Harmful algal blooms (HABs) occur when algae, simple plants that live in the sea and form the base of the food web, produce toxic or harmful effects on people, fish, shellfish, marine mammals and birds.
Algal species range from microscopic (such as phytoplankton) to the large, multicellular conglomerates commonly known as seaweeds.
The Harmful Algal Bloom and Hypoxia Research and Control Act was signed into law on November 13, 1998, becoming P.L. 105-383 and reauthorized in December 2004 (P.L. The Act recognized that many U.S. coastal areas suffer from HABs and hypoxia each year, threatening coastal ecosystems and endangering human health.
oceanservice.noaa.gov /topics/coasts/hab/welcome.html   (1632 words)

  
 USATODAY.com - Fighting algal bloom and gloom   (Site not responding. Last check: )
Scientists are expanding research beyond the organisms' basic biology to look for ways to track and forecast their emergence, their effects on the health and livelihoods of coastal residents, and their economic impact, which runs into the tens of millions of dollars in the United States alone.
Algae blooms are popping up with increasing frequency around the world, due in part to farm and waste runoff.
Where blooms are less obvious on the surface, researchers are looking for ways to detect changes that correlate with an emerging bloom.
www.usatoday.com /tech/science/2005-07-27-algae-bloom-toxin_x.htm   (1498 words)

  
 Jim Saxton (NJ03) - Press Release - House Passes Algal Bloom Legislation   (Site not responding. Last check: )
H.R.1856, gthe Harmful Algal Bloom and Hypoxia Research Amendments Act of 2004,h was passed in a voice vote today.
Harmful algal blooms (HABs) are dense mats of toxic algae that affect coastal communities by causing illness and sometimes death in marine life.
Hypoxia occurs when an algal bloom decays, which consumes all the oxygen in the water.
www.house.gov /list/press/nj03_saxton/pr040707AlgalBloom.html   (400 words)

  
 NOAA's National Ocean Service: Harmful Algal Blooms
Harmful algal blooms (HABs) occur when algae, simple plants that live in the sea and form the base of the food web, produce toxic or harmful effects on people, fish, shellfish, marine mammals and birds.
Algal species range from microscopic (such as phytoplankton) to the large, multicellular conglomerates commonly known as seaweeds.
The Harmful Algal Bloom and Hypoxia Research and Control Act was signed into law on November 13, 1998, becoming P.L. 105-383 and reauthorized in December 2004 (P.L. The Act recognized that many U.S. coastal areas suffer from HABs and hypoxia each year, threatening coastal ecosystems and endangering human health.
www.nos.noaa.gov /topics/coasts/hab/welcome.html   (1632 words)

  
 GulfBase - Harmful Algal Blooms
Harmful Algal Bloom (HAB) is a descriptive term that refers to the bloom phenomenon of a few microscopic algae that produce potent toxins which negatively affect public health, commercial fishing, recreation and tourism.
Algal toxins can be transferred through the food web where they affect and even kill higher forms of life such as zooplankton, shellfish, fish, birds, marine mammals, and even humans that feed either directly or indirectly on them.
Their goal is to develop an understanding of the population dynamics and trophic impacts of harmful algal species, which can be used as a basis for minimizing adverse effects on the economy, public health, and marine ecosystems.
www.gulfbase.org /issue/view.php?iid=hab   (523 words)

  
 Algal bloom - Definition, explanation
This bioaccumulation of toxins causes bivalves – like oysters and clams – collected in areas affected by algal blooms to be potentially dangerous for human consumption.
So-called fl water is a dark discoloration of sea water, first described in the Bay of Florida in January 2002 [1].
Although fishermen in Florida complained and requested that the "government do something", scientists say that fl water results from a non-toxic algal bloom, probably of diatoms.
www.calsky.com /lexikon/en/txt/a/al/algal_bloom.php   (653 words)

  
 Harmful Algal Bloom Research   (Site not responding. Last check: )
We have been studying the harmful algal bloom known as Brown Tide, which occurs in several small embayments of Long Island, New York, New Jersey and coastal waters of other Middle Atlantic states.
Aureococcus anophagefferens, the small algal species responsible for these brown tides, can cause cessation of feeding and eventually the death of bivalves (especially scallops) exposed to high abundances of the alga.
Blooms of noxious species of the dinoflagellate Prorocentrum often cause red tides in the area, and massive blooms of the dinoflagellate Lingulodinium polyhedrum are a common occurrence during summer and fall along the Southern California Bight.
www.usc.edu /dept/LAS/biosci/Caron_lab/hab.html   (802 words)

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