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Topic: Algeria


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  Algeria - MSN Encarta
Algeria was a colony of France from the mid-19th century until it won independence in 1962 in one of the bloodiest independence struggles in history.
Algeria’s economy was underdeveloped and based largely on agriculture at the time of independence, and the government soon began efforts to modernize it.
Algeria is bounded on the east by Tunisia and Libya; on the south by Niger, Mali, and Mauritania; and on the west by Morocco.
encarta.msn.com /encyclopedia_761554128/Algeria.html   (827 words)

  
 Algeria. The Columbia Encyclopedia, Sixth Edition. 2001-05
N Algeria is subject to earthquakes, which, as in 1954, 1980, and 2003, may be devastating, killing and injuring thousands.
Roman civilization in Algeria had been eroded by incursions of Berbers, and the destruction wreaked by the Vandals (who passed through Algeria on their way to Tunisia) in 430–431 marked the end of effective Roman control.
A number of small Muslim states rose and fell in Algeria, but generally the eastern part of the country came under the influence of dynasties centered in Tunisia (notably the Aghlabid of Kairouan) and the western part was controlled by states centered in Morocco (notably the Almoravids and Almohads).
www.bartleby.com /65/al/Algeria.html   (3385 words)

  
 Index of Economic Freedom 2006 - Algeria
Algeria gained its independence from France in 1962 and imposed a socialist economic model that retarded economic growth, wasted oil wealth, and exacerbated social, political, and economic problems when oil prices declined in the late 1980s.
Algeria is the world's second largest exporter of natural gas and has the world's fifth largest natural gas reserve and 14th largest oil reserve.
Algeria's monetary policy score is 1 point worse this year; however, its trade policy score is 1 point better, and its fiscal burden of government score is 0.3 point better.
www.heritage.org /research/features/index/country.cfm?id=Algeria   (955 words)

  
 Algeria - Background
Algeria is bordered by Morocco to the west and Tunisia to the east.
Given the country's varied climate and topography, Algeria's population of over 30 million is concentrated mainly in the northern part of the country, where the majority of live in urban centres.
Algeria has a relatively young and rapidly growing population: 60 percent of Algerians are under 20 years of age.
www.uneca.org /aisi/nici/country_profiles/Algeria/algerab.htm   (689 words)

  
 BBC NEWS | Middle East | Country profiles | Country profile: Algeria
Algeria was originally inhabited by Berbers until the Arabs conquered North Africa in the 7th century.
Algeria's television and radio stations are state-controlled, but there is a lively private press which is often critical of the authorities.
Algeria can be a dangerous environment for media workers; 57 journalists were murdered between 1993-97.
news.bbc.co.uk /2/hi/middle_east/country_profiles/790556.stm   (784 words)

  
 Algeria Country Analysis Brief   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-10-22)
Algeria should also see a sharp increase in crude oil exports over the next few years, due to the rapid substitution of natural gas for oil in domestic energy consumption.
Algeria's Saharan Blend oil, 45° API with negligible (0.05%) sulfur content, is among the highest quality in the world, and European countries have relied upon Algerian oil to help meet increasing stringent EU regulations on sulfur content of gasoline and diesel fuel.
Algeria has ambitious plans for the expansion of the Arzew port area, including the construction of a petrochemicals complex, a condensate refinery, and a desalination plant.
www.eia.doe.gov /emeu/cabs/algeria.html   (5576 words)

  
 Foreign & Commonwealth Office Country Profiles
Algeria is in North Africa, bordering the Mediterranean Sea between Morocco and Tunisia.
In 1830 Algeria was colonised by the French and ruled as part of the metropolitan France from 1848 and 1962.
Algeria has traditionally been active in the UN - it was elected to the Security Council for 2004-5 - as well as being a prominent member of the Non-Aligned Movement (NAM), the African Union (AU) and the Arab League.
www.fco.gov.uk /servlet/Front?pagename=OpenMarket/Xcelerate/ShowPage&c=Page&cid=1007029394365&a=KCountryProfile&aid=1018535850896   (1714 words)

  
 Algeria News
COLONISATION was a form of "genocide" for Algeria's identity and traditions, the president, Abdelaziz Bouteflika, said yesterday in his latest strong comments about France's historical role in North Africa.
Algeria began manufacturing the bird flu drug Tamiflu under the brand name Saiflu in preparation for a possible pandemic of the disease, the Algerian news agency APS reported.
Algeria's foreign exchange reserves stood at $61 billion at the end of February, up from $56 billion in November 2005, the banking reform minister said at the weekend.
www.topix.net /world/algeria   (637 words)

  
 WTO | Accession status: Algeria
Algeria's Working Party was established on 17 June 1987 and met for the first time in April 1998.
The eight meeting of the Working Party for the accession of Algeria to the WTO was held on 25 February under the chairmanship of the ambassador of Uruguay, Mr.
Algeria submitted initial offers on goods and services in March 2002, and revised offers were circulated on 18 January 2005.
www.wto.org /english/thewto_e/acc_e/a1_algerie_e.htm   (241 words)

  
 Algérie Algéie Country Information - Location, Map, Area, Capital, Population, Religion, Language
Location: Algeria is situated in northwest Africa, bordered to the north by the Mediterranean Sea, to the east by Tunisia and Libya, to the south by Niger and Mali, and to the west by Mauritania and Morocco.
Membership: Algeria is a member of the UN, OAU, the Arab League, Union of the Arab Maghreb, OPEC and Organization of the Islamic Conference.
The chief monetary unit of Algeria is the dinar (54.75 dinars equal U.S.$1; 1996).
www.arab.de /arabinfo/algeria.htm   (320 words)

  
 A Travel Guide to Algeria - Africa
Algeria is the second-largest country in Africa (Sudan being the largest) and is situated in northwestern Africa, with the northern coastline running along the Mediterranean Sea.
The northern parallel mountain ranges of the Saharan Tell or Maritime Atlas, comprising coastal massifs and inland ranges, and the Saharan Atlas divide Algeria into three longitudinal zones running generally eastwest: the Mediterranean zone; the high plateaus; and the Sahara which covers some 85% of the entire area.
About half of Algeria is 914 m (3,000 ft) or more above sea level, and about 70% of the area is from 762 m (2,500ft) to 1675m (5,500 ft) in elevation.
www.africaguide.com /country/algeria   (228 words)

  
 Flag of Algeria - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
The crescent has become an Islamic symbol, and originated on the flag of Turkey.
The naval ensign for Algeria is identical to the national flag, with the exception of a two red crossed anchors in the canton.
The Western blazon is per pale Vert and Argent; a crescent and star Gules.
en.wikipedia.org /wiki/Flag_of_Algeria   (160 words)

  
 The EU's relations with Algeria - Overview   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-10-22)
On the African scene, Algeria played an important mediating role in the Ethiopian/Eritrean conflict during its chairmanship of the Organisation of African Unity (OAU) in 2000.
The EU has also issued statements on the political situation in Algeria, the last on the situation in the Kabylie region, in June 2001 at the Göteborg European Council.
Financial co-operation is based on the 1979 Co-operation Agreement between the EC and Algeria, which was followed up by four Financial Protocols, then by the Barcelona Declaration and the MEDA regulation.
europa.eu.int /comm/external_relations/algeria/intro   (1215 words)

  
 French Colonies - Algeria
Algeria, in northwest Africa, is part of the region known as the Maghrib.
The continent's second-largest nation (after Sudan), Algeria borders Tunisia, Libya, Niger, Mali, Mauritania, Morocco, and Western Sahara and stretches from its 1,104-km (686-mi) coastline on the Mediterranean Sea south through a varied topography to the vast desert region of the Sahara (see map).
Since gaining independence, Algeria has tried to liberate itself from the economic legacy of colonialism through ambitious development plans financed by the sale of petroleum and natural gas.
www.discoverfrance.net /Colonies/Algeria.shtml   (1109 words)

  
 Algeria´s History - Algeria became a French territory and in 1848 was made a département attached to France
Algeria´s first inhabitants were Berbers, who still represent a significant minority.
Algeria also criticized French military intervention elsewhere in Africa, while further grievances were the trade imbalance in favour of the former colonial power, and recurrent disputes over the price of Algerian exports of gas to France; the French Government´s determination to reduce the number of Algerians residing in France was another source of contention.
The political establishment in Algeria is going through a political roller coaster, which started with a controversial presidential election and continues with the surrender of the Islamic Salvation Army or AIS and the conditions in which this event was negotiated by the new President, Mr.
www.arab.de /arabinfo/algehis.htm   (473 words)

  
 Algeria (11/05)
Algeria is divided into 48 wilayates (states or provinces) headed by walis (governors) who report to the Minister of Interior.
Algeria has the seventh-largest reserves of natural gas in the world (2.7% of proven world total) and is the second-largest gas exporter; it ranks 14th for oil reserves.
In 2001, Algeria concluded an Association Agreement with the European Union, which was ratified in 2005 by both Algeria and the EU and took effect in September of that same year.
www.state.gov /r/pa/ei/bgn/8005.htm   (5668 words)

  
 Foreign & Commonwealth Office Travel Advice by Country   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-10-22)
 Algeria's most active terrorist group, the GSPC, issued a statement on 12 June 2004, declaring their intention to target "every infidel foreign individual, establishment and interest (in Algeria").
Security forces have been the target of terrorist attacks in Algeria, and are highly sensitive of their own security.
For advice on health issues in Algeria, such as vaccinations that may be required, you should speak to your GP or check the Department of Health’s website:  www.dh.gov.uk.
www.fco.gov.uk /servlet/Front?pagename=OpenMarket/Xcelerate/ShowPage&c=Page&cid=1007029390590&a=KCountryAdvice&aid=1013618385585   (1605 words)

  
 Algeria
Algeria is a multi-party republic based on a constitution and a presidential form of government.
In Algeria's first democratic, contested presidential elections, he was re-elected in April from among five other candidates while the military remained neutral.
Algeria is emerging from over a decade of terrorism and civil strife in the 1990s, in which between 100,000 and 150,000 persons were estimated to have been killed.
www.state.gov /g/drl/rls/hrrpt/2004/41718.htm   (12272 words)

  
 Travel Advice for Algeria - Australian Department of Foreign Affairs and Trade
Algeria is in an active seismic zone and is subject to earthquakes.
Australian/Algerian dual national males may be subject to compulsory military service and other obligations when in Algeria and should seek advice from the nearest Embassy or Consulate of Algeria, well in advance of travel.
If you are travelling to Algeria, whatever the reason and however long you’ll be there, we strongly encourage you to register with the Department of Foreign Affairs and Trade.
www.smartraveller.gov.au /zw-cgi/view/Advice/Algeria   (1701 words)

  
 An MBendi Profile: An MBendi Country Profile for Algeria including economic and travel overviews and directories of ...
Algeria’s government has identified the oil and gas industry sectors as the most important as a generator of revenue.
Algeria is in fact the world’s fifth largest importer of wheat.
Algeria has a number of chambers of commerce and industry and details of these can be found via our Organisation Search, as can details of relevant government departments.
www.mbendi.co.za /land/af/al/p0005.htm   (1919 words)

  
 Algeria - Atlapedia Online   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-10-22)
It is bound by the Mediterranean Sea to the north, Morocco to the west, Mauritania and Mali to the southwest, Niger to the southeast, Libya to the east and Tunisia to the northeast.
CLIMATE: The climate of Algeria is divided into three types, (1.) a Mediterranean in the north with dry hot summers and mild wet winters with rainfall increasing from west to east.
Although Algeria is predominantly a Muslim nation it is one of the few Muslim countries to have a surplus of females and over 50% of the population reported to be under the age of 20.
www.atlapedia.com /online/countries/algeria.htm   (1369 words)

  
 CIA - The World Factbook -- Algeria   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-10-22)
Algeria must also diversify its petroleum-based economy, which has yielded a large cash reserve but which has not been used to redress Algeria's many social and infrastructure problems.
Algeria has the seventh-largest reserves of natural gas in the world and is the second-largest gas exporter; it ranks 14th in oil reserves.
Algeria is running substantial trade surpluses and building up record foreign exchange reserves.
www.cia.gov /cia/publications/factbook/geos/ag.html   (1431 words)

  
 Adventures of Algeria
Algeria has the longest distances of North Africa, the dramatic and green coast of the north, mountains with people of strong cultural identity, endless desert, breathtaking oases, and vulcanic mountains.
Algeria has had its appeal in low tourist numbers, and a cultivated and hospitable people.
Today however, normal travelling in Algeria is very difficult and heavily resticted due to the ongoing conflict of the country.
lexicorient.com /algeria   (81 words)

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