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Topic: Algonquian


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  White Dove's Native American Indian Site algonquian-languages
Algonquian words were once described by the linguist Edward Sapir as resembling "tiny imagist poems." Sapir's analogy aptly captures the remarkable flexibility and specificity made possible by Algonquian morphological and syntactic structures.
Algonquian languages, like English, also mark number (singular and plural) and person (first, second, and third), although Algonquian languages make an additional distinction between the first person plural in which the hearer or addressee is included (first person plural inclusive) and the one in which the hearer is not included (first person exclusive).
Algonquian languages such as Cree and Ojibwa still serve the needs of large communities of speakers, and many of the surviving languages such as Maliseet-Passamaquoddy are now the subject of revitalization programs designed to bring the languages back into use among younger speakers.
users.multipro.com /whitedove/encyclopedia/algonquian-languages.html   (797 words)

  
 Algonquian Indian Genealogy
The Algonquian tribes fled before theme to the region of the upper lakes and the banks of the Mississippi, and only when the French had guaranteed them protection against their deadly foes did they venture to turn back toward the north.
The central Algonquians are tall, averaging about 173 cm.; they have the typical Indian nose, heavy and prominent, somewhat hooked in men, flatter in women; their cheek bones are heavy; the head among the tribes of the great lakes is very large and almost brachycephalic, but showing considerable variation; the face is very large.
The eastern Algonquian tribes probably equaled the Iroquois in bravery, intelligence, and physical powers, but lacked their constancy, solidity of character, and capability of organization, and do not appear to have appreciated the power and influence they might have wielded by combination.
www.accessgenealogy.com /native/tribes/algonquian/algonhist1.htm   (3373 words)

  
 Algonquian languages - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
The Algonquian (also Algonkian) languages are a subfamily of Native American languages that includes most of the languages in the Algic language family (the two Algic languages that are not Algonquian are Wiyot and Yurok of northwestern California).
The Algonquian language family is renowned for its complex polysynthetic morphology and sophisticated verb system.
Because Algonquian languages were some of the first that Europeans came in contact with in North America, the language family has given many words to English.
en.wikipedia.org /wiki/Algonquian   (691 words)

  
 Algonquian   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-10-22)
The "Algonquian" language family is renowned for its complex morphology and sophisticated verb system.
The Algonquian spiritual practices were derived from the Yematasi Medicine Culture.
Consequently the "religious" aspects of the Algonquian people as well as most of the Native American nations within North America have been lost to all but a few Wanagi Cha.
www.bidprobe.com /en/wikipedia/a/al/algonquian.html   (384 words)

  
 Encyclopedia of North American Indians - - Algonquian Languages   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-10-22)
Algonquian languages mark grammatical categories of gender based not on biological sex, but rather on a distinction roughly corresponding to that in nature between living and nonliving entities—categories labeled inanimate and animate by linguists.
Algonquian languages, like English, also mark number (singular and plural) and person (first, second, and third), although Algonquian languages make an additional distinction between the first person plural in which the hearer or addressee is included (first person plural inclusive) and the one in which the hearer is not included (first person plural exclusive).
Algonquian nouns consist of stems to which both prefixes and suffixes may be added to indicate gender, number, person, and possession.
college.hmco.com /history/readerscomp/naind/html/na_001400_algonquianla.htm   (790 words)

  
 Algonkin
Both Algonkin and Algonquin are correct spellings for the name of the tribe, but Algonquian either refers to their language or, collectively, to the group of tribes that speak related Algonquian languages.
Algonquian is a family of related languages, but it has many dialects, not all of which are mutually intelligible.
Dreams were of particular importance to the Algonquian peoples, and proper interpretation was an important responsibility of their shamans whose other duties included communication with the spirit world, guiding men's lives, and healing the sick.
www.tolatsga.org /alg.html   (5697 words)

  
 Ancestral Art: Information on Algonquian Culture
The Algonquian peoples were a series of distinct tribes which occupied an area spanning from the Pacific Northwest (USA and Canada) to Newfoundland (east coast of Canada).
Birch bark was indispensable for the Algonquian, being used for everything from containers to scrolls for manuscripts to canoes to toboggans for travelling over the snow.
Algonquian rock art is remarkably similar no matter what area it appears in.
www.ancestral.com /cultures/north_america/algonquian.html   (1931 words)

  
 Algonquian languages - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-10-22)
The Algonquian (also Algonkian) languages are a subfamily of Native American languages that includes most of the languages in the Algic language family (others are Wiyot and Yurok of northwestern California).
They should be carefully distinguished from Algonquin, which is only one language of many Algonquian languages.
and the pre-colonial language of the Lumbees may also have been Algonquian languages, but in both cases documentary evidence is at best very weak.
www.pineville.us /project/wikipedia/index.php/Algonquian   (662 words)

  
 Encyclopedia: Algonquian   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-10-22)
Blackfoot is the name of any of the Algonquian languages spoken by the Blackfeet tribe of Native Americans, currently in the northwestern plains of North America.
The Menominee language is an Algonquian language spoken on the Menominee (Menomini) Nation lands in Northern Wisconsin in the United States.
Words of Algonquian origin have entered American English and thence have been exported to the English language in general and many European languages.
www.nationmaster.com /encyclopedia/Algonquian   (2188 words)

  
 Algonquian
The Algonquian people occupied most of the Canadian region south of Hudson Bay between the Rocky Mountains and the Atlantic Ocean and, excluding certain territory held by Siouan and Iroquoian tribes, that section of what is now the United States extending northward from North Carolina and Tennessee.
Algonquian tribes inhabited various isolated areas to the south and west, including parts of what are now South Carolina, Iowa, Wyoming, and Montana.
As with the Ojibway and Cree languages, also of Algonquian stock, and Inuktitut, Algonquin is among those rare Native languages in North America with a very good chance of surviving and even progressing in the future.
www.angelfire.com /realm/shades/nativeamericans/algonquian.htm   (1159 words)

  
 UofM: Arts Research Showcase - Linguistics Department   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-10-22)
The Linguistics Department at Manitoba is home to the leading team of researchers in the analysis of such languages as Cree and Ojibwe –; belonging to the Algonquian family of languages –; and their comparative study.
The Algonquian Linguistics Group combines cutting-edge research in theoretical linguistics with the preparation of reference grammars and dictionaries of the languages as they are spoken today.
Algonquian and Iroquoian Linguistics (currently volume 25, 2000; John D. Nichols, ed.) includes occasional papers but, most important, documents the current activities of the field through its running bibliography.
www.umanitoba.ca /faculties/arts/deans_office/research/wolfart.shtml   (536 words)

  
 Algonquian History Part II
However, the Algonquian, Montagnais, and their Huron allies were reluctant to commit themselves to the long, dangerous journey to Quebec unless the French were willing to help them in their war against the Mohawk.
Because of the Algonquian converts at Oka, all of the Algonquian were committed to the French cause through a formal alliance known as the Seven Nations of Canada, or the Seven Fires of Caughnawaga.
The Algonquian homeland was supposed to be protected from settlement by the Proclamation of 1763 and the Quebec Act of 1774, but after the revolution ended in a rebel victory, thousands of British Loyalists (Tories) left the new United States and settled in Upper Canada.
www.manataka.org /~manataka/page387.html   (4190 words)

  
 Algic languages - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-10-22)
Most Algic languages are part of the Algonquian subfamily, which are spoken from the Rocky Mountains to New England.
The last known Wiyot speaker died in 1962, and Yurok is thought to have ten or fewer speakers.
Within the Algonquian subfamily there is a smaller genetic grouping of the Eastern Algonquian languages.
www.butte-silverbow.us /project/wikipedia/index.php/Algic_languages   (277 words)

  
 Native Americans: Algonquian Indians (Algonkian tribe, Algonquians, Algonkians)
Algonquian tribes range from the Yurok in California to the Powhatans in Virginia, from the Cheyennes in the Great Plains to the Naskapi Innu in frigid northern Labrador.
The Ohio Valley Algonquian Tribes are poorly known because most of them were destroyed by smallpox epidemics and Iroquois attacks, but the Shawnee survived and are probably representative.
There are many other Algonquian Indian tribes, including the Cree, the Chippewa, and the Blackfoot, but most non-natives know them by their real tribal names.
www.geocities.com /bigorrin/algonquian_kids.htm   (1951 words)

  
 Algonquian - Ethnos - Books about the Algonquian People
Algonquian is most of the Algic or Yematasi Native American language family.
Because Algonquian languages were some of the first that Europeans came in contact with in North America, the language family has given many words to English such as potato, tomato, tomahawk, skunk, squash, wampum, succotash and pecan.
A number of the tribes vanished in the seventeenth and eighteenth centuries, and their stories with them, for not until the late nineteenth century were many tales written down.
www.almudo.com /ethnos/Algonquian.htm   (767 words)

  
 Algonquian Language Family (Algonkian Indian Languages, Algic, Algonquian Indians)
Algonquian Indian languages are not related to Ancient Egyptian, Hebrew, or other semitic languages; this data was faked.
Algonquian Indian language distribution and the migration of the Algonquians.
Explanation of the terms Algonquin, Algonkin, Algonquian, and Algonkian.
www.native-languages.org /famalg.htm   (279 words)

  
 Algonquian languages --¬† Encyclop√¶dia Britannica
Among the numerous Algonquian languages are Cree, Ojibwa, Blackfoot, Cheyenne, Micmac, Arapaho, and Fox-Sauk-Kickapoo.
The language families included in Macro-Algonquian are Algonquian, with 13 languages; Yurok, with 1 language; Wiyot, with 1 language; Muskogean, with 4 languages; and Natchez, Atakapa, Chitimacha, Tunica, and Tonkawa, with 1...
This phylum is, after the Algonquian, the largest native American linguistic phylum north of Mexico.
www.britannica.com /eb/article-9005702?tocId=9005702   (792 words)

  
 The Loup A/R B Dialect of the Algonquian Y Language
Algonquians were a single speech community 4000-4300 years which linguists call proto-Algonquian.
Algonquian and many Southeastern (Gulf) languages have a comon protolanguage and split 5000-6000 years ago.
The costal Algonquians were in spardoic contact with Europeans through much of the a.d.1500s.
www.geocities.com /TimesSquare/3199/natick.html   (1833 words)

  
 Iroquois & Algonquian WebQuest   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-10-22)
You are being asked to investigate the culture of the Algonquian or Iroquois Indian Tribes.
Algonquian- Encyclopedia Britannica - Explains the Algonquian languages and discusses the specific tribes that spoke it.
Algonquian History - Gives historical background on the Algonquians, as well as information on their culture.
www.kn.pacbell.com /wired/fil/pages/webnativeaje.html   (1151 words)

  
 Algonquian Indians   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-10-22)
Algon'quian Indians, the largest and most widely scattered group of tribes in North America.
They were fierce people, these Algonquians, and wherever they met the European colonists long and bloody wars followed until the natives were driven across the Alleghanies.
Corn was a great staple among the Algonquian, who cultivated the soil about their permanent homes of bark and logs.
www.factopia.com /practical-reference/algonquian-indians.htm   (215 words)

  
 The Lenapes: A study of Hudson Valley Indians - Prehistory
This Algonquian civilization is said to have been migrants similar to the habitat in Northeastern Asia.
The Wappinger were flanked by their two Algonquian neighbors, the Mahican to the north and the Delaware to the south.
The Algonquians were big game hunters in which they used various types of clovis spear points and chipped stone.
www.ulster.net /~hrmm/halfmoon/lenape/len-preh.htm   (1057 words)

  
 Algonquian : Algonquin   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-10-22)
Algonquian is most of the Algic Native American language family.
(The rest is Wiyot[?] and Yurok[?].) Stretching from the east coast all the way Alberta, Canada, the Algonquian language family includes such languages as Ojibwe, Cree, Fox, Shawnee[?], Menominee[?], Mohican, Potawatomi[?], Cheyenne, Blackfoot, Sauk, and Micmac[?].
Many eastern states have names of Algonquian origin (Massachusetts, Illinois, Michigan, Ohio, Wisconsin), as well as many cities (Milwaukee, Chicago).
www.eurofreehost.com /al/Algonquin.html   (284 words)

  
 Algonquian   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-10-22)
A member of any of the North American Indian groups speaking an Algonquian language and originally living in the subarctic regions of eastern Canada; many Algonquian tribes migrated south into the woodlands from the Mississippi River to the Atlantic coast.
"Algonquian" is generally used as an adjective (general or positive) -- approximately 100.00% of the time.
"Algonquian" is used about 3 times out of a sample of 100 million words spoken or written in English.
www.websters-online-dictionary.org /Al/Algonquian.html   (819 words)

  
 Algonquian
Up until the turn of the 20th century, the majority of Algonquians retained their ancestral religious practices and a nomadic way of life revolving around hunting, fishing, trapping and gathering.
Thereafter, a growing number of Algonquians began to settle down, especially after the Abitibi region was opened for colonization.
In 1991, the Algonquians of Lac-Rapide signed a one-of-a-kind agreement with the governments of Québec and Canada seeking to prepare a draft plan for the integrated development of renewable resources – forest and wildlife – in Réserve faunique La Vérendrye.
www.autochtones.gouv.qc.ca /relations_autochtones/profils_nations/algonquins_en.htm   (215 words)

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