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Topic: Allen Newell


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In the News (Sat 26 Jul 14)

  
  Allen Newell, March 19, 1927—July 19, 1992 | By Herbert A. Simon | Biographical Memoirs
Allen Newell was born in San Francisco on March 19, 1927, the son of Dr. Robert R. Newell, a distinguished professor of radiology at Stanford Medical School, and Jeanette Le Valley Newell.
Allen acquired a love of the mountains that never left him (an early ambition was to become a forest ranger) and a love of sports that, combined with his 6´1" height and sturdy build, led to the high school football team.
Allen came to doubt that lack of experimental evidence was the limiting factor in the progress of cognitive psychology.
stills.nap.edu /readingroom/books/biomems/anewell.html   (7153 words)

  
 MITECS: Newell, Allen
Allen Newell (1927-1992), cognitive psychologist and computer scientist, made profound contributions to fields ranging from computer architecture and programming software to artificial intelligence, cognitive science, and psychology.
Newell was born on March 19, 1927, in San Francisco, the son of Dr. Robert R. Newell, a distinguished radiologist on the faculty of the Stanford Medical School, and Jeanette LeValley Newell.
Newell received his doctorate in 1958, joined the faculty of Carnegie Tech in 1961 as a full professor, and retained this position for the remaining three decades of his life.
rm-f.net /~pennywis/MITECS/Articles/simon2.html   (788 words)

  
  Allen Newell - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
Allen Newell (March 19, 1927 - July 19, 1992) was a researcher in computer science and cognitive psychology at the RAND corporation and at Carnegie-Mellon’s School of Computer Science.
Allen was a graduate student at Princeton in the year of 1949 to 1950 when he studied mathematics.
Due to the exposure to a new field known as game theory and the experiences from the study of mathematics, he was convinced that he would prefer “a combination of experimental and theoretical research to pure mathematics” (Simon).
en.wikipedia.org /wiki/Allen_Newell   (654 words)

  
 Information Processing Language - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
Information Processing Language (IPL) was a programming language developed by Allen Newell, Cliff Shaw and Herbert Simon at RAND Corporation and the Carnegie Institute of Technology from about 1956.
Newell had the role of language specifier/application programmer, Shaw was the system programmer and Simon took the role of application programmer/user.
Allen Newell, Herbert A. Simon, Biographical Memoirs, National Academy of Sciences - includes a short section on IPL.
en.wikipedia.org /wiki/Information_Processing_Language   (367 words)

  
 Reid Simmons Wins Allen Newell Medal for Research Excellence
Carnegie Mellon University's School of Computer Science (SCS) awarded its Allen Newell Medal for Research Excellence to Reid Simmons, research professor in the Robotics Institute.
"Allen Newell would be proud, excited and amused, all at the same time, to see how Reid's work ties together Allen's interest in artificial intelligence with his work in human-computer interaction," said Randal Bryant, dean of SCS.
These robots epitomize Allen Newell's interests in artificial intelligence and human-computer interaction in visionary and constructive ways.
www.cmu.edu /cmnews/extra/040528_newellmedal.html   (352 words)

  
 PAW | Allen Newell *50   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-10-07)
ALLEN NEWELL, professor of computer science at CarnegieMellon Univ. and a pioneer in the field of artificial intelligence, died of cancer July 19, 1992, at the age of65.
Newell was awarded his bachelor's degree in physics by Stanford Univ. He was a graduate student at Princeton in mathematics and in 1957 received his doctorate in industrial administration from Carnegie Institute of Technology, For four years, he worked with the Rand Corp. as a research scientist.
Newell was awarded the National Medal of Science.
webscript.princeton.edu /~paw/memorials/memdisplay.php?id=2944   (146 words)

  
 The Death of Allen Newell
Allen Newell — a grandfather of Artificial Intelligence, an exemplary human being, and my own greatest role model —; died of prostate cancer on July 19, 1992, at the age of 65.
Allen Newell had a sacred mission — to understand the nature of the human mind — and he consecrated his entire life to that purpose.
Allen Newell died last week, yet he lives on in my conscience, watching to see what I will do.
www.geocities.com /joe_tebelskis/writings/newell.html   (1900 words)

  
 Nat' Academies Press, Memorial Tributes: National Academy of Engineering, Volume 7 (1994)
Newell is considered one of the founders of the field of artificial intelligence, and was a major scientific figure in the field of cognitive psychology.
Newell was elected to the National Academy of Engineering in 1980 and the National Academy of Sciences in 1972.
In Newell's last lecture to his CMU students and colleagues in December 1991, he characterized his career as ''desires and diversions." His main desire was the quest for an understanding of mind—mechanistic models of mental processes so detailed that precise predictions of human behavior could be made and tested.
www.nap.edu /openbook/0309051460/html/154.html   (1142 words)

  
 Libraries/UnivArchives: Biography [Carnegie Mellon Libraries]
Newell earned a Ph.D. in industrial administration from CIT in 1957 and joined the CIT faculty as a professor in 1961.
Simon, Herbert A. Allen Newell: A Biographical Memoir.
Newell presents a retrospection of his lifelong pursuit of a single scientific goal: understanding the nature of the human mind.
diva.library.cmu.edu /Newell/biography.html   (371 words)

  
 Allen Newell Summary   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-10-07)
Allen Newell, an expert on how people think and a developer of complex information processing programs, was a pioneer in the field of artificial intelligence.
Newell was born in San Francisco on March 19, 1927, the son of Robert R. and Jeannette (LeValley) Newell.
Newell was born in San Francisco, California, on March 19, 1927, the son of Dr. Robert R. Newell, a distinguished professor of radiology at Stanford Medical School, and Jeanette Le Valley Newell.
www.bookrags.com /Allen_Newell   (2799 words)

  
 [No title]
Newell's theory was motivated by three major problems in the field of knowledge representation, "mystification of the role of representation, the residue of the theorem proving controversy, and the conflicting webwork of opinions on knowledge" [KL:92].
Newell provided scientific grounds on which much research could tackle knowledge in a way that does not reduce it to psychology, sociology, logic or philosophy, but allows it to be discussed and explored as a distinct topic in its own right.
Newell's theory was also used in two other ways: to guide the generation of examples and counter-examples that helped progress the debate - an example of a visible interaction - and to exclude certain things from consideration - types of ontology (implementation-oriented ones) - and thus define the scope of debate.
www.isi.salford.ac.uk /dooy/papers/levels/kl20f.html   (19340 words)

  
 Dictionary of Philosophy of Mind - Newell, Allen   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-10-07)
After doing graduate work in mathematics at Princeton, Newell became a scientific staff member at Rand Corporation, where he did research on artificial intelligence and cognitive psychology, with a focus on problem-solving and cognitive architectures that supports intelligent action.
Newell joined the Carnegie Institute of Technology faculty in 1961.
At the time of his death, Newell was the U.A. and Helen Whitaker University Professor of Computer Science at Carnegie Mellon University.
www.artsci.wustl.edu /~philos/MindDict/newell.html   (258 words)

  
 Newell
Newell lived there only a few years; perhaps he left because he was provoked with the grand jury that indicted him in 1905 for “Unlawfully selling goods and carrying on his general mercantile business and commissary on the Lord’s Day.”
Newell had a post office in the community from 1904-1917 and six postmasters through the years handled the village’s mail.
In the summer of 1913, Newell was connected with the rest of the world when the first telephone was installed.
www.okefenokeepress.com /NEWELL.html   (808 words)

  
 Allen Newell Obituary
Newell earned an international reputation for his pioneering work in artificial intelligence, the theory of human cognition and the development of computer software and hardware systems for complex information processing.
Newell, a professor of psychology and the U.A. and Helen Whitaker professor of computer science at the time of his death, wrote and co-authored more than 250 publications, including 10 books.
Newell was a member of the National Academy of Sciences, the National Academy of Engineering and the American Academy of Arts and Sciences.
www.princeton.edu /~hos/frs122/newellobit.html   (675 words)

  
 Learn more about Allen Newell in the online encyclopedia.   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-10-07)
Allen Newell (March 19, 1927 - July 19, 1992) was a researcher in computer science and cognitive psychology.
He contributed to the Information Processing Language (1956) and two of the earliest AI programs, the Logic Theory Machine (1956) and the General Problem Solver (1957).
Allen Newell, Herbert A. Simon, Biographical Memoirs, National Academy of Sciences\n
www.onlineencyclopedia.org /a/al/allen_newell.html   (154 words)

  
 Allen Newell - Psychology Wiki - a Wikia wiki
Allen Newell (March 19, 1927 - July 19, 1992) was a researcher in computer science and cognitive psychology at the RAND corporation and at Carnegie Mellon University’s School of Computer Science.
Newell was a graduate student at Princeton during 1949-1950 when he studied mathematics.
Due to the exposure to a new field known as game theory and the experiences from the study of mathematics, he was convinced that he would prefer "a combination of experimental and theoretical research to pure mathematics" (Simon).
psychology.wikia.com /wiki/Allen_Newell   (728 words)

  
 ch1-1
Like Van Allen, Newell was a good committee man. He was, however, frequently frustrated with himself and his subordinates because of his inability to cope instantly and perfectly with the requests and complaints of his superiors and his scientific peers.
Newell, Pickering, and Whipple were members of the Upper Atmosphere Rocket Research Panel, chaired by Van Allen, Newell, now superintendent of the Astronomy and Atmospheric Physics Division at NRL, was coordinator of the Vanguard Science Program, as well as chairman of SCIGY.
Newell, a member of the Technical Panel and the Vanguard Science Program coordinator, was also the supervisor of the NRL scientists, LaGow and Friedman, who had proposed the first two experiments on the Technical Panel's priority list.
www.hq.nasa.gov /pao/History/SP-4215/ch1-1.html   (4227 words)

  
 Active Skim View of: ALLEN NEWELL
COGNITIVE ARCHITECTURE Allen, from an early stage of his research and increasingly as the years passed, was especially concerned with computational architecture and modeling the control structures underlying intelligence.
SCIENCE STATESMANSHIP It is hard to know whether to classify the time Allen spent as a citizen of the university and of the wider science community as one of his diversions or as part of the mainstream of his scientific work.
It is fitting to conclude this account with a selection from Allen Newell's own set of maxims for the dedicated scientist, proposed in his "Desires and Diversions" talk of December 1991, for these maxims describe his own life: To each scientific life, its own style; and each style defines a life.
www.nap.edu /nap-cgi/skimit.cgi?isbn=0309057388&chap=141-174   (1349 words)

  
 Allen Newell - Encyclopedia.WorldSearch   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-10-07)
Allen Newell (March 19, 1927 - July 19, 1992) was a researcher in computer science and cognitive psychology at the RAND corporation.
Allen Newell’s plea for a unified theory of cognition, titled, “You can’t play twenty questions with nature and win,” (1973), has been realized, although not perfected, by his colleagues.
In particular, John Anderson’s ACT theory has become a widely popular unified architecture, successfully employed by cognitive scientists today to simulate human behavior in a wide range of tasks.
encyclopedia.worldsearch.com /allen_newell.htm   (230 words)

  
 Allen Newell Definition / Allen Newell Research   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-10-07)
Allen Newell (March 19March 19 is the 78th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar (79th in leap years).
He contributed to the Information Processing LanguageInformation Processing Language (IPL) was a programming language developed by Allen Newell, Cliff Shaw and Herbert Simon at RAND Corporation and the Carnegie Institute of Technology from about 1956.
Allen Newell is the UA and Helen Whitaker University Professor of Computer Science at Carnegie-Mellon University, where he has been since 1961.
www.elresearch.com /Allen_Newell   (357 words)

  
 Theories of Intelligence :: Allen Newell   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-10-07)
Among his other contributions to artificial intelligence and cognitive science, Allen Newell defined a framework in which to interrelate cognitive architectures and define intelligence.
Newell defined intelligence in terms of how well a system approximated a knowledge-level system.
Newell states that a cost tradeoff between them exists, and that some balance gives the best performance for cost.
ai.eecs.umich.edu /cogarch2/theory/newell.html   (335 words)

  
 [No title]   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-10-07)
Allen Newell had a long and rich scientific career that contributed to multiple subdisciplines in computer science.
Still, each individual endeavor was pursued with a characteristic style that his colleagues, students, and friends recognized as essential to Allen.
The criteria by which a research project is judged is predicated, foremost, on the belief that a good idea is not enough.
inst.eecs.berkeley.edu /~cs268/sp03/newell.txt   (228 words)

  
 The Knowledge Level Hypothesis: Our point of view   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-10-07)
The knowledge level hypothesis was introduced by Allen Newell in 1982 (Newell, 1982).
Allen Newell formulated this hypothesis in a tentative to solve the confusions in the use of the « knowledge » and « representation » terms.
To conclude on Newell's knowledge level hypothesis, we think that only a part of it has been exploited in the « knowledge level approaches ».
ksi.cpsc.ucalgary.ca /KAW/KAW96/lecoeuche/newell.html   (655 words)

  
 David Haussler honored
As the recipients of the 2003 Allen Newell Award, they demonstrate the remarkable influence that computer science and artificial intelligence can have on other sciences, on practical tools, and on human thought.
The Allen Newell Award, which is cosponsored by ACM and the American Association for Artificial Intelligence (AAAI), comes with a cash prize of $10,000.
He is president of the Board of Directors of the Daniel Pearl Foundation, and has asked that his share of the Allen Newell Award be donated to the foundation.
currents.ucsc.edu /03-04/05-03/haussler.html   (623 words)

  
 Harvard University Press/Unified Theories of Cognition
Psychology is now ready for unified theories of cognition--so says Allen Newell, a leading investigator in computer science and cognitive psychology.
Not everyone will agree on a single set of mechanisms that will explain the full range of human cognition, but such theories are within reach and we should strive to articulate them.
Newell shows how Soar's ability to operate within the real-time constraints of intelligent behavior, such as immediate-response and item-recognition tasks, illustrates important characteristics of the human cognitive structure.
www.hup.harvard.edu /catalog/NEWUNI.html   (224 words)

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