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Topic: American White Ibis


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In the News (Mon 1 Sep 14)

  
  Picture of a White Ibis (bird)
The White Ibis is a medium-sized wading bird with a body shape Similar to the Great Blue Heron.
The preferred nesting sites for the White Ibis are barriers, marshes, spoil islands on the coast, and islands in inland lakes.
Brazos Bend provides the perfect conditions; White Ibis are easily spotted around the park's lakes and swamps.
www.photohome.com /photos/animal-pictures/birds/white-ibis-1.html   (151 words)

  
  American White Ibis - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
American White Ibis (Eudocimus albus) is a species of wading bird of the ibis family Threskiornithidae which occurs from the mid-Atlantic coast of the United States south through most of the New World tropics.
White ibises are monogomous and colonial, usually nesting in mixed colonies with other wading species.
Juveniles are largely brown with duller bare parts; they are distinguished from the Glossy and White-faced Ibises by white underparts and rumps.
en.wikipedia.org /wiki/American_White_Ibis   (283 words)

  
 White
Culmer White The Culmer White was a Isle of Thanet.
Knights of the White Camelia The Knights of the White Camelia was a Ku Klux Klan.
White Nile The White Nile is a Nile.
www.brainyencyclopedia.com /topics/white.html   (7979 words)

  
 White Ibis - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
There are three species of bird named White Ibis.
Asiatic White Ibis is an alternative name for the Black-headed Ibis, Threskiornis melanocephala
This is a disambiguation page, a list of pages that otherwise might share the same title.
en.wikipedia.org /wiki/White_Ibis   (89 words)

  
 The Wild Ones: White Ibis   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-10-24)
During the day, white ibis may fly up to 15 miles or more to find small crustaceans, fish, frogs, and aquatic insects to eat and to feed their young.
White ibis live the Biramas Swamp of Cuba.
White ibis live in the wetlands of the interior and coastal marshes and swamps.
www.thewildones.org /Animals/whiteIbis.html   (439 words)

  
 American White Ibis -- Facts, Info, and Encyclopedia article   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-10-24)
They have all-white (The light horny waterproof structure forming the external covering of birds) plumage except for fl wing-tips (visible in flight) and reddish bills and legs.
Juveniles are largely brown with duller bare parts; they are distinguished from the (additional info and facts about Glossy) Glossy and (additional info and facts about White-faced Ibis) White-faced Ibises by white underparts and rumps.
This bird hybridizes with the (additional info and facts about Scarlet Ibis) Scarlet Ibis, and they are sometimes considered conspecific.
www.absoluteastronomy.com /encyclopedia/a/am/american_white_ibis.htm   (318 words)

  
 List of North American birds   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-10-24)
North American birds most closely resemble those of Eurasia, which was connected to this continent until geologically recent times.
This list is based on a checklist used by the American Birding Association (ABA), the list used by most field guides for "North American" birds.
The original list published by the American Ornithologists' Union (AOU) in 1886 covered birds found in North America north of Mexico, and included Baja California, Bermuda and Greenland.
hallencyclopedia.com /List_of_North_American_birds   (1182 words)

  
 nebirds 30 Jul 1999   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-10-24)
The White Ibis could be seen from the parking lot at the top of the hill north of the marsh, but better views were seen from the road going east and west just north of the refuge.
The ibis was feeding along the edge of the water in the northeast edge of the marsh.
White Ibis from the parking area on the Northwest corner of the marsh.
rip.physics.unk.edu /NOU/Archive/19990730.html   (8343 words)

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