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Topic: Amiskwia


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In the News (Mon 24 Sep 18)

  
  Amiskwia - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
Amiskwia is a small, probably gelatinous animal of unknown affinity known from fossils of the Middle Cambrian Burgess shale formation in British Columbia.
Amiskwia was originally categorized by Paleontologist Charles Walcott.
This, along with the fins and tail, suggest it was a swimming animal that was inadvertently trapped in the turbid sediment flows that formed the Burgess deposits.
www.wikipedia.org /wiki/Amiskwia   (221 words)

  
 Amiskwia
The preservation of the 5 known specimens leaves much to be desired.
Walcott[?] who thought he saw three buccal spines as a chaetognath worm.
Amiskwia is thought to have been a swimming animal trapped inadvertently in the turbid flows that formed the Burgess Shale deposits.
www.ebroadcast.com.au /lookup/encyclopedia/am/Amiskwia.html   (141 words)

  
 Amiskwia: Definition and links.
Amiskwia is a small, probably gelatinous, animal of unknown affinity from the Burgess shale near Field, BC.
Amiskwia vaguely resembles a tiny walrus constructed by a magician out of balloons.
Morris-1977 regards it as being the single known species in an otherwise unknown phylum.
www.encyclopedian.com /am/Amiskwia.html   (140 words)

  
 Dictionary of Meaning www.mauspfeil.net
''Amiskwia'' was originally categorized by Paleontology Paleontologist Charles Walcott.
Walcott thought he saw three buccal spines in the fossils, and therefore categorized ''Amiskwia'' as a chaetognatha chaetognath worm (arrow worm).
However, since ''Amiskwia'' appears to lack the characteristic grasping spines and teeth of other Burgess fossil arrow worms, so later scientists suggested it was more likely a nemertea nemertean (ribbon worm).
www.mauspfeil.net /Amiskwia.html   (255 words)

  
 National Museum of Natural History - Paleobiology   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-10-14)
Amiskwia shows us three definite body segments: a head with two prominent tentacles, an unsegmented trunk with stubby side fins, and a flattened tail.
The fins and tail suggest this was an active swimmer (also suggested by its rare appearance in the Burgess Shale formation).
However, Amiskwia appears to lack the characteristic grasping spines and teeth of other BC fossil arrow worms, so later scientists suggested it was more likely a nemertean (ribbon worm).
www.nmnh.si.edu /paleo/shale/pamisk.htm   (266 words)

  
 Museumkennis - Amiskwia
Amiskwia is een uitgestorven zeedier, dat leefde gedurende het Cambrium (ca.
Het was een plat, wormachtig dier met een paar tentakels op de kop, een paar zijvinnen en een staartvin.
Amiskwia leek enigszins op Pijlwormen (Chaetognatha) van tegenwoordig.
www.museumkennis.nl /nnm.dossiers/museumkennis/i000300.html   (38 words)

  
 Talk:Amiskwia - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
Look for Amiskwia in Wiktionary, our sister dictionary project.
Look for Amiskwia in the Commons, our repository for free images, music, sound, and video.
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www.wikipedia.org /wiki/Talk:Amiskwia   (101 words)

  
 The systematic position of the Middle Cambrian fossil Amiskwia Walcott -- Owre and Bayer 36 (6): 1361 -- Journal of ...
The systematic position of the Middle Cambrian fossil Amiskwia Walcott -- Owre and Bayer 36 (6): 1361 -- Journal of Paleontology
The systematic position of the Middle Cambrian fossil Amiskwia Walcott
The form described by Walcott as Amiskwia sagittiformis and assigned by him to the Phylum Annelida, Class Chaetognatha, is compared with extant species which belong to this class.
jpaleontol.geoscienceworld.org /cgi/content/abstract/36/6/1361   (79 words)

  
 Encyclopedia: Amiskwia   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-10-14)
Updated 194 days 10 hours 33 minutes ago.
Only one species, Amiskwia sagittiformis, has been described.
Click for other authoritative sources for this topic (summarised at Factbites.com).
www.nationmaster.com /encyclopedia/Amiskwia   (249 words)

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