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Topic: Amputation


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  VascularWeb: Amputation
When performing an amputation, a surgeon removes a limb, or part of a limb, that is no longer useful to you and is causing you great pain, or threatens your health because of extensive infection.
Although amputations may be required for other reasons, such as severe injury or the presence of a tumor, the most common reason you may need an amputation is if you have peripheral arterial disease (PAD) due to atherosclerosis (hardening of the arteries).
PAD is the leading cause of amputation in people age 50 and older, and accounts for up to 90 percent of amputations overall.
www.vascularweb.org /_CONTRIBUTION_PAGES/Patient_Information/NorthPoint/Amputation.html   (1797 words)

  
  Amputation
Amputation is an acquired condition that results in the loss of a limb, usually from injury, disease, or surgery.
In the US, 82 percent of amputations are due to vascular disease, 22 percent to trauma, 4 percent are congenital, and 4 percent are due to tumors.
The goal of rehabilitation after an amputation is to help the patient return to the highest level of function and independence possible, while improving the overall quality of life - physically, emotionally, and socially.
www.healthsystem.virginia.edu /uvahealth/adult_pmr/amput.cfm   (451 words)

  
  Healthopedia.com - Amputation (Limb Removal)
Amputation is a surgery to remove a limb or part of a limb.
Amputation can also happen as an accident, which is called a traumatic amputation.
An amputation is done in an operating room.
www.healthopedia.com /amputation   (420 words)

  
 Amputation - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
In Islamic countries, amputation of the hands or feet is sometimes used as a form of punishment for criminals.
Genital modification and mutilation may involve amputating tissue, although not necessarily as a result of injury or disease.
Also in 2003, an Australian coal miner amputated his own arm with a Stanley knife after it became trapped when the front-end loader he was driving overturned three kilometers underground.
en.wikipedia.org /wiki/Amputation   (445 words)

  
 Dorlands Medical Dictionary
rapid amputation of a limb by a circular sweep of the knife and a cut of the saw, the entire cross-section being left open for dressing; done when primary closure of the stump is contraindicated, owing to the possibility of recurrent or developing infection.
amputation of the foot with disarticulation of the tibia from the calcaneus, astragalectomy, and the placing of the calcaneus in the mortise between the tibia and fibula.
excision of the root of a tooth; amputation of the root of a single-rooted tooth is called apicoectomy, and that of one root of a two-rooted mandibular tooth is hemisectomy.
www.mercksource.com /pp/us/cns/cns_hl_dorlands.jspzQzpgzEzzSzppdocszSzuszSzcommonzSzdorlandszSzdorlandzSzdmd_a_32zPzhtm   (2147 words)

  
 Amputation - Medical Encyclopedia   (Site not responding. Last check: )
Some types of amputation are foot amputations, ankle disarticulation, below-knee amputation, knee-bearing amputation, above knee amputation, hip disarticulation, amputation of digits, metacarpal amputation, wrist disarticulation, forearm amputation, elbow disarticulation, above-elbow amputation, and shoulder disarticulation and forequarter amputation.
Amputation is usually done for medical reasons, but in some countries also as official punishment.
A few people have an "amputation fetish", feeling that they are not "complete" until they have a certain part amputated.
www.nursingstudy.com /encyclopedia/Amputation.html   (270 words)

  
 Symes Amputation .
They also recommend, although without definitive data, that amputation in most cases be performed prior to the age of two years to reduce the psychological and emotional attachments to the limb.
Syme's amputation is indicated to the younger, more active patient due to its increased metabolic efficiency when walking as compared to a midfoot amputation.
Syme's amputation is principally indicated for congenital foot deformities which can not be corrected to a plantigrade position, fibular hemimelia and severe injury to the foot as long as the heel pad remains viable.
podiatry.curtin.edu.au:16080 /encyclopedia/symes   (2104 words)

  
 Amputation - Information about Amputation
Almost all leg amputations are performed because you are suffering from the effects of blood vessel disease.
Amputation, however, is always a last resort and will only be recommended if it does not look possible to improve the circulation in any other way.
As amputation is most often performed as an urgent or even emergency procedure, it is unusual to have much time to prepare.
www.surgerydoor.co.uk /medical_conditions/Indices/A/amputation.htm   (773 words)

  
 Wilson's Creek NB: Civil War Medicine
Along with amputations, the treatment of gunshot wounds was one of the most common medical procedures of the war.
Amputations were necessary when any one of three conditions prevailed: massive tissue or muscle loss, severe trauma to joints and bones, and vascular damage.
The average amputation could be finished in 10-15 minutes, partly due to the fact that the surgeon had to treat many patients and had to work as quickly as he could.
www.nps.gov /wicr/cwmedicine.html   (1318 words)

  
 Amputation - New York Presbyterian Hospital
In the US, 70 percent of amputations are due to disease, 22 percent to trauma, 4 percent are congenital, and 4 percent are due to tumors.
The peak age for amputations is between 41 and 70 years of age, with 75 percent of all amputations occurring in people over the age of 65.
Acquired amputations in children are usually due to trauma (70 percent) and cancers (30 percent).
www.nyp.org /health/amputation.html   (590 words)

  
 Surgical Care at the District Hospital
Amputation refers to the surgical or traumatic removal of the terminal portion of the upper or lower extremity.
The ideal levels for a lower extremity amputation are 12 cm proximal to the knee joint (transfemoral) and 8–14 cm distal to the knee joint (transtibial).
Amputations more proximal on the foot (tarsometatarsal joint or midtarsal joint) are acceptable, but may lead to muscle imbalance.
www.steinergraphics.com /surgical/006_18.7.html   (795 words)

  
 OHSU Health - Amputation   (Site not responding. Last check: )
In the US, 70 percent of amputations are due to disease, 22 percent to trauma, 4 percent are congenital, and 4 percent are due to tumors.
Seventy-five percent of upper extremity amputations are related to trauma.
The goal of rehabilitation after an amputation is to help the patient return to the highest level of function and independence possible, while improving the overall quality of life - physically, emotionally, and socially.
www.ohsuhealth.com /htaz/plassurg/reconstr/amputation.cfm   (433 words)

  
 amputation - Hutchinson encyclopedia article about amputation
Loss of part or all of a limb or other body appendage through surgery or accident.
"Of course you may put it that way," was the reply; "but, seriously, I once threw over a most charming girl on learning quite accidentally that she had suffered amputation of a toe.
I said I believed the average man dreaded tooth-pulling more than amputation, and that he would yell quicker under the former operation than he would under the latter.
encyclopedia.farlex.com /amputation   (173 words)

  
 Collect Medical Antiques -- General Sugery & Amputation   (Site not responding. Last check: )
Amputation sets (15,16)and surgical etuis (16a, 16b)from the 18th century are extremely rare though became more available as makers addressed the needs of a growing American population that subsequently became engaged in a Civil War (17-20).
The large amputation saw (24 ‡î) is probably German in origin and from the early 16th century.
This 18th century knife was designed for a rapid circular amputation with the sharp edge located on the upper curved surface.
www.collectmedicalantiques.com /amputation.html   (1002 words)

  
 Amputation | World of Health
Amputation is performed to remove tissue that no longer has an adequate blood supply; to remove malignant tumors; and because of severe trauma to the body part.
Amputations cannot be performed on patients with uncontrolled diabetes mellitus, heart failure, or infection.
The goal of all amputations is twofold: to remove diseased or damaged tissue so that the wound will heal cleanly, and to construct a stump that will allow the attachment of a prosthesis or artificial replacement part.
www.bookrags.com /research/amputation-woh   (576 words)

  
 Amputation Information on Healthline
Amputation is the intentional surgical removal of a limb or body part.
Amputation cannot be performed on patients with uncontrolled diabetes mellitus, heart failure, or infection, and is also inadvisable for patients with blood clotting disorders.
After amputation, medication is prescribed for pain, and patients are treated with antibiotics to discourage infection.
www.healthline.com /galecontent/amputation   (854 words)

  
 Amputation, NursingDiabetics.com, Your Total Diabetes Resource
Risk of foot amputation may be double for diabetes patients :ahcpr.gov:"Patients with diabetes often develop blisters and cuts that do not heal, leading to infection and sometimes an amputation.
Lower extremity amputation in patients with diabetes:Southern Foot surgery, Inc. and Center for specialized diabetes foot services of Mississippi:"1989-1992 there was approximately 51,605 amputation annually leading cause was nonhealing foot ulceration and its complication 85% of lower extremity amputation are preceded by foot ulcers peripheral neuropathy, peripheral vascular disease, infection help facilitate ulcer.
Amputation from diabetic foot complications- includes information on these complications:emedicine:"Any discussion of the diabetic foot requires introduction of the concept of function-preserving amputation surgery.
www.nursingdiabetics.com /amputation.html   (1060 words)

  
 Limb Amputation in Dogs
Limb amputation is a surgical procedure commonly performed in dogs to remove a diseased or injured limb, either front or rear.
Amputation may be recommended when there are multiple fractures and extensive trauma to the muscles, tendons and ligaments of the limbs.
Amputation may be recommended in cases of fractured or traumatized limbs as a less expensive option to treating a complicated medical or surgical problem.
www.petplace.com /dogs/limb-amputation-in-dogs/page1.aspx   (810 words)

  
 Congenital amputation
Congenital amputation is the absence of a fetal limb or fetal part at birth.
An estimated one in 2,000 babies are born with all or part of a limb missing, ranging from a missing part of a finger to the absence of both arms and both legs.
Congenital amputation resulting in the complete absence of a limb beyond a certain point (and leaving a stump) is called transverse deficiency or amelia.
www.lifesteps.com /gm/Atoz/ency/congenital_amputation.jsp   (1046 words)

  
 Foot Gangrene Control: Amputation Surgery Defined - Full of Health Inc.
Amputation of a toe or leg is one of the oldest surgical procedures.
In fact, amputations are an extremely feared complication of diabetes as diabetics often loose their protective sensation and may form ulcerative complications, such as osteomyelitis - an acute or chronic inflammatory process of the bone and its structures.
A ray amputation is a particular form of minor amputation where a toe and part of the corresponding metatarsal bone is removed; and the wound is usually left open to heal.
www.reversegangrene.com /foot_gangrene_amputation_definition_print.htm   (4256 words)

  
 Amputation definition - Medical Dictionary definitions of popular medical terms easily defined on MedTerms
Amputation: Removal of part or all of a body part enclosed by skin.
It is performed to prevent the spread of gangrene as a complication of frostbite, injury, diabetes, arteriosclerosis (hardening of the arteries), or any other illness that impairs blood circulation.
Two other types of amputation are self-amputation, which occurs when a trapped person frees himself or herself by removing part or all of a body part, and congenital amputation, which occurs when a person is born without part or all of a body part.
www.medterms.com /script/main/art.asp?articlekey=12537   (479 words)

  
 Below Knee Amputation - Wheeless' Textbook of Orthopaedics
One-stage versus two-stage amputation for wet gangrene of the lower extremity: a randomized study.
Guillotine amputation in the treatment of nonsalvageable lower-extremity infections.
Below-knee amputation using the sagittal technique: a comparison with the coronal amputation.
www.wheelessonline.com /ortho/below_knee_amputation   (936 words)

  
 MAYFIELD et al. Survival following amputation   (Site not responding. Last check: )
Amputation of the lower limb is generally viewed as an ominous event portending poor survival, with four-year survival reported from 22 percent (1) to 76 percent (2).
Two amputation codes during the same operation were assigned as a single amputation at the most proximal level for this analysis.
The percent of amputation by the other age groups was: 0 to 44 years (3.8 percent), 45 to 54 years (8.3 percent), 55 to 64 years (26.1 percent), 75 to 84 years (15.3 percent), and over 85 years (2.2 percent).
www.vard.org /jour/01/38/3/mayf2383.htm   (2117 words)

  
 eMJA: Campbell et al, The lower limb in people with diabetes   (Site not responding. Last check: )
Amputation is about 15 times more common in people with diabetes and half of all lower-limb amputations are in people with diabetes.
Amputation rates vary around Australia, with rates in north Queensland being twice that of the rest of the State.
Amputation of one limb increases the risk of loss of the second limb and is associated with a 50% five-year mortality.
www.mja.com.au /public/issues/173_07_021000/campbell/campbell.html   (2403 words)

  
 Amputation | World of Invention
Even amputation at the thigh, which previously had been very rare because of the extremely heavy (usually fatal) bleeding, was now often necessary.
Amputations on the battlefield were carried out swiftly and in great number.
It remained for Joseph Lister (1811-1886) to introduce antiseptics for amputation to become a successful procedure, and as modern physicians learned new, effective ways to treat illnesses and infections, amputation steadily became less necessary.
www.bookrags.com /research/amputation-woi   (480 words)

  
 UAB Health System | Amputation   (Site not responding. Last check: )
The peak age for amputations is between 41 and 70 years of age, with 75 percent of all amputations occurring in people over the age of 65.
Amputation is an acquired condition that results in the loss of a limb, usually from injury, disease, or surgery.
In the U.S., 82 percent of amputations are due to vascular disease, 22 percent to trauma, 4 percent are congenital, and 4 percent are due to tumors.
www.health.uab.edu /hospital/show.asp?durki=59718   (635 words)

  
 Physiological Comparisons of Physically Active Persons with Transtibial Amputation Using Static and Dynamic Prostheses ...
The desire of individuals with transtibial amputation who have active lifestyles to participate in recreational sports and competitive athletics has prompted additional innovations, including the development of variations in the pylon design of the lower extremity prosthesis.
However, unlike other reports, optimal gait efficiency for the subjects with transtibial amputation occurred at a higher speed that was approximately the same as that seen for the subjects with nonpathological gait.
In addition to the type of foot design, the level of physical activity appears to be a contributory factor affecting physiological responses in individuals with transtibial amputation and may possibly be one of underlying explanations to equivocal results of gait studies.
www.oandp.org /jpo/library/2000_02_060.asp   (3923 words)

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