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Topic: Amu Darya


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In the News (Mon 18 Dec 17)

  
  Amu Darya - MSN Encarta
The Amu Darya is formed by the junction of the Pandj and Vakhsh rivers in the Pamirs mountain region, on Tajikistan's southwestern border.
The Amu Darya’s main tributaries are the Panj and Vakhsh rivers, which both rise in the Pamirs.
The largest single cause of the decline in the Amu Darya’s water level is the Garagum Canal, the longest canal in the former Soviet Union and one of the longest in the world.
encarta.msn.com /encyclopedia_761569800/Amu_Darya.html   (456 words)

  
 Amu Darya — FactMonster.com
The Kara Kum Canal (c.500 mi/800 km long) carries water from the Amu Darya near Kelif across S Turkmenistan to Ashgabat and supplements the flow of the Tejen and Murgab rivers.
The Amu Darya is paralleled by the Trans-Caspian RR, which has lessened the river's importance as a transport route.
In ancient times the Amu Darya was called the Oxus and figured importantly in the history of Persia and in the campaigns of Alexander the Great.
www.factmonster.com /ce6/world/A0803828.html   (285 words)

  
  Amu Darya Summary
While societies rose and declined along the Amu Dar'ya throughout the Bronze and Iron Ages and afterward, effective irrigation was a constant concern for the region's aristocratic and commercial elite; some speculate, for instance, that Khworezm's shift of capitals to Khiva was due largely to natural alterations of the Amu Dar'ya.
The Amu Darya or Amudarya (Uzbek: Amudaryo, Persian: آمودریا Darya means sea, ocean or river), is the longest river in Central Asia.
Amu is said to have come from the city of Āmul, now known as Türkmenabat.
www.bookrags.com /Amu_Darya   (990 words)

  
 AllRefer.com - Amu Darya (CIS And Baltic Physical Geography) - Encyclopedia   (Site not responding. Last check: )
Amu Darya or Amudarya[both: AmOO´ dAryA´, A´mOO dAr´yu] Pronunciation Key, river, c.1,600 mi (2,580 km) long, formed by the junction of the Vakhsh and Pandj rivers, which rise in the Pamir Mts.
The Amu Darya is paralleled by the Trans-Caspian RR, which has lessened the river's importance as a transport route.
In ancient times the Amu Darya was called the Oxus and figured importantly in the history of Persia and in the campaigns of Alexander the Great.
reference.allrefer.com /encyclopedia/A/AmuDarya.html   (321 words)

  
 Exhibition & excursion
Amu Darya is the biggest river in Central Asia.
Amu Darya river is formed after junction of Panj and Vakhsh rivers.
The main Amu Darya flow is formed in the territory of Tajikistan (80%) and partially in the Northern Afghanistan.
www.transwaterconference2005.org /english/side_amu_eng.htm   (316 words)

  
 ZEF Homepage: Amu Darya
The border region of the Amu Darya is situated in the periphery of national influence, wherefore the analysis of its local structures is insightful for the development conditions of statehood and the perspectives for stability in the region.
The aim of this research project is to identify the perspectives of statehood in the border region of Amu Darya (northeast Afghanistan, southeast Uzbekistan and southwest Tajikistan).
The study is focused on the analysis of the reciprocal relationships of local governance and the exertion of influence on behalf of the state in the context of fragile statehood.
www.zef.de /amudarya.0.html   (257 words)

  
 Amu Darya - Article from FactBug.org - the fast Wikipedia mirror site   (Site not responding. Last check: )
The Amu Darya (in Persian آمودریا;; Darya means "river" in Persian) rises in the Pamirs and flows mainly north-west through the Hindu Kush, Turkmenistan, and Uzbekistan to join the Aral Sea in a large river delta.
Use of water from the Amu Darya for irrigation has been a major contributing factor in the shrinking of the Aral Sea since the late 1950s.
In antiquity the river was known to the Westerners as the Oxus, and historical records state that in different periods the river has flowed into the Aral Sea, the Caspian Sea or both, similar to the Jaxartes river.
www.factbug.org /cgi-bin/a.cgi?a=3067   (193 words)

  
 [No title]   (Site not responding. Last check: )
This is the largest remaining area, in the Amu Darya basin, of the tugai forest, a type of flood-plain forest that is peculiar to the river-basins of Central Asia.
This canal drew water from a gravity intake on the left bank of the Amu Darya river, and ran parallel to the river, irrigating land predominantly in the Beruni district.
The decreasing levels of water in the Amu Darya (and Syr Darya) have caused shrinking of the Aral Sea and increase in salinity of the sea.
www-wds.worldbank.org /servlet/WDSContentServer/WDSP/IB/2003/04/05/000094946_0303220424324/Rendered/INDEX/multi0page.txt   (16351 words)

  
 Amu Darya River, the major river of Uzbekistan and Central Asia :: Oxus and Jaxartes - ancient names of Amu Darya and ...
Amu Darya River, the major river of Uzbekistan and Central Asia.
Amu Darya (or Amudarya) river, 2.580 km long, formed by the junction of the Vakhsh and Pandj rivers, which rise in the Pamir.
In ancient times the Amu Darya was called the Oxus and figured importantly in the history of Persia and in the campaigns of Alexander the Great.
www.orexca.com /amudarya_uzbekistan.shtml   (346 words)

  
 AQUASTAT - FAO's Information System on Water and Agriculture   (Site not responding. Last check: )
The main Amu Darya River can be divided into three reaches: the upper reach bordering Afghanistan and Tajikistan, and where most of the water flow is generated; the middle reach which first borders Uzbekistan and Afghanistan and then enters Turkmenistan; and the lower reach in Uzbekistan, before it discharges into the Aral Sea.
In the upper reaches of the Amu Darya and Syr Darya basins, less than 10% of the land is saline or highly saline, while downstream (especially in Karakalpakstan) about 95% of the land is saline, highly saline or very highly saline.
In the newly reclaimed areas (Hunger and Djizak steppes in the Syr Darya basin, Surkhan-Sherabad and Karshi steppes in the Amu Darya basin), drainage is mainly subsurface drainage.
www.fao.org /ag/AGL/aglw/aquastat/countries/uzbekistan/index.stm   (3537 words)

  
 Amu Darya
Syr Darya Syr Darya Syr Darya Syr Darya (also known as Syrdarya or Sirdaryo) is a relatively recent one in western writings; prior to the early 20th century, the river was known as the Jaxartes.
Syr Darya (also known as Syrdarya or Sirdaryo) is a river in recent Kazakhstan in river for mountains one and 20th 2,220 known The Tien north-west rises as Shan western a km Uzbekistan, two was also in southern to Darya see relatively some through it see
In ancient times Transoxania or area between Amu Darya and Sir Darya rivers and current Northwestern Afghanistan area was on of the centers area two order current civilization, be had of the centers several other traditions inhabits stock.
fo78.majestic-choices.com /amudarya.html   (902 words)

  
 Publications
In the Amu Darya Basin alone, a total of 84 million tons of salt is discharged into the river, transported with the water which is used to irrigate the fields (Kobori and Glantz, 1998; Spoor, 1998; Dukhovny and Stulina, 2001).
The Syr Darya is shared by four states and, in case of Uzbekistan, is shared twice as after flowing from Kyrgyzstan and crossing the Uzbek part of the Ferghana valley the river flows into the Tajik territory in the western Ferghana Valley and then pours again into Uzbekistan.
The Amu Darya is shared by four countries – Tajikistan as the upstream riparian, Afghanistan, Uzbekistan and Turkmenistan – and forms the border in some stretches between Tajikistan, Uzbekistan and Afghanistan, and between Turkmenistan and Uzbekistan.
www.transboundarywaters.orst.edu /publications/related_research/votrin/votrin_thesis.html   (15304 words)

  
 Amu Darya River Water Allocation Model   (Site not responding. Last check: )
Models of water allocation for the Amu Darya or Syr Darya Rivers, whose runoff is formed in Kyrgyzstan and Tajikistan, and used in Uzbekistan, Turkmenistan, and Kazakstan, can be very useful for the improvement of water management in the region.
In this basin there are two main rivers, the Amu Darya and Syr Darya, whose flow forms in the mountain zones of Kyrgyzstan and Tajikistan and is used in the valley and desert zones of Turkmenistan, Uzbekistan, and Kazakstan.
The Amu Darya and Kashkadarya river water allocation models should be applied by the Basin Water Management Association (BVO) Amu Darya and in the Water Survey of the Kashkadarya oblast.
www.ee-environment.net /docs/adp1fine.htm   (4566 words)

  
 Amu Darya   (Site not responding. Last check: )
The Amu Darya River, known in ancient times as the Oxus, is the largest river in central Asia and is formed by the junction of the Pandj and Vakhsh rivers.
This water is replaced by inflow from the two major rivers that drain into the Aral, the Amu Darya and Syr Darya.
Since the 1950’s the Amu Darya has been heavily tapped for irrigation, which has greatly reduced its water level and the amount of water reaching the Aral Sea.
www.geol.lsu.edu /WDD/ASIAN/AmuDarya/amu_darya.htm   (1132 words)

  
 [No title]   (Site not responding. Last check: )
The basin of the Amu Darya is located between 34° 30 ' - 43° 45 ' North latitude and 56° 15 ' - 75° 7 ' East longitude in territory of the Republic of Afghanistan, Tadjikistan, Uzbekistan and Turkmenistan.
The Amu Darya is formed by confluence of the Pyandge (Afghanistan) and Vahsh (Tadjikistan) rivers.
The total catchment area of the Amu Darya basin is 227800 sq.
enrin.grida.no /htmls/uzbek/report/english/amudar.htm   (149 words)

  
 Aral Sea   (Site not responding. Last check: )
The Syr Darya and the Amu Darya, both beginning in the Himalayas, are responsible for 90% of the water flowing into the Aral Sea.
Before 1960, the Amu Darya transported about 73 cubic kilometers (cu km) per year, and the Syr Darya about 37 cu km per year with almost half of the water vanishing before reaching the Aral Sea, due to high rates of water use, evaporation, and transpiration.
The Amu Darya contributed 50-60 cu km and the Syr Darya contributed only 20-30 cu km in the 1970s and 1980s, and only 5 cu km in 1989-1990.
www.lawrence.edu /dept/environmental_studies/aralsea.html   (2038 words)

  
 MISR Image: Amu Darya River   (Site not responding. Last check: )
This false-color image of the Amu Darya River was acquired by the Multi-angle Imaging SpectroRadiometer (MISR) in late June, 2002, and represents an area of about 292 kilometers x 370 kilometers.
The Amu Darya river forms a wide delta in the western deserts of Uzbekistan and northeastern Turkmenistan, and the river waters are utilized intensively to irrigate cotton and other crops.
Within the area of this image, the width of the main river is widest in the lower right-hand corner (closer to its source in the mountains of Afghanistan) and is greatly reduced by the time it reaches the edges of the dwindling Aral Sea.
eosweb.larc.nasa.gov /HPDOCS/misr/misr_html/amu_darya_river.html   (367 words)

  
 Highbeam Encyclopedia - Search Results for Amu   (Site not responding. Last check: )
The Caspian Kara Kum or Garagum, the larger desert (c.115,000 sq mi/297,900 sq km), is W of the Amu Darya River and includes most of Turkmenistan.
Amu wins in Jhalakathi: Victor has a margin of 68,793 votes: Polling suspended in one center due to clashes: Elen rejects results, demands
Former Mujahadeen, Author and Scholar Joins AMU Faculty; Neamat Nojumi to Begin Teaching Afghanistan Courses in December.
www.encyclopedia.com /SearchResults.aspx?Q=Amu&StartAt=11   (668 words)

  
 Kathy Lyne Jones: Story - "The Aral Sea"
Water from the Amu Darya and Syr Darya rivers, which once emptied glacial melt from the mountains of northeastern Afghanistan and Kirghizia into this vast geologic depression in Soviet Central Asia, now irrigates surrounding cropland.
Extensive canals were dug to spread the water of the Amu Darya and Syr Darya across the desert floor.
Salt from the Aral's former seabed is deposited to the northwest as far as the farms of Byelorussia and to the southeast as far as the glaciers in Afghanistan that feed the Amu Darya.
www.unr.edu /cos/geography/GAIN/materials/aral_sea.html   (3794 words)

  
 Digimorph - Pseudoscaphirhynchus kaufmanni (Amu Darya Sturgeon)
The large Amu Darya shovelnose sturgeon (Pseudoscaphirhynchus kaufmanni) is the largest of the of three currently recognized species of the genus Pseudoscaphirhynchus, which are all relatively small sturgeons (adult lengths range from 20-75 cm depending on the species; this is in contrast to species of Huso, which historically may have reached 10 meters in length).
This specimen was collected from Asia, Amu Darya River from Kerki to 4 km downstream of Kerki bridge; 7 April 1999, collectors: B.R. Kuhajda, R.L. Mayden, V.B. Salnikov.
It was made available to The University of Texas High-Resolution X-ray CT Facility for scanning by Eric Hilton of the Field Museum of Natural History in Chicago, IL courtesy of the University of Alabama Ichthyological Collection.
digimorph.org /specimens/Pseudoscaphirhynchus_kaufmanni   (1275 words)

  
 Digimorph - Pseudoscaphirhynchus kaufmanni (Amu Darya Sturgeon)
The large Amu Darya shovelnose sturgeon (Pseudoscaphirhynchus kaufmanni) is the largest of the of three currently recognized species of the genus Pseudoscaphirhynchus, which are all relatively small sturgeons (adult lengths range from 20-75 cm depending on the species; this is in contrast to species of Huso, which historically may have reached 10 meters in length).
This specimen was collected from Asia, Amu Darya River from Kerki to 4 km downstream of Kerki bridge; 7 April 1999, collectors: B.R. Kuhajda, R.L. Mayden, V.B. Salnikov.
It was made available to The University of Texas High-Resolution X-ray CT Facility for scanning by Eric Hilton of the Field Museum of Natural History in Chicago, IL courtesy of the University of Alabama Ichthyological Collection.
www.digimorph.org /specimens/Pseudoscaphirhynchus_kaufmanni   (1275 words)

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