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Topic: Anesthetic


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In the News (Sun 19 Nov 17)

  
  TOPICAINE TOPICAL ANESTHETIC WELCOME PAGE
It is specially formulated to penetrate intact skin, for the relief of pain caused by minor skin irritations, minor burns, minor cuts and insect bites.
Similar topical anesthetic creams are compounded by the other firms, and today’s action serves as a general warning to firms that produce standardized versions of these creams.
FDA is advising consumers who have questions or concerns about compounded topical anesthetic creams to contact their health care providers.
www.topicaine.com   (404 words)

  
  Mesothelioma SOS - Glossary - Anesthetic
Anesthetic is a medically used substance that causes the loss of consciousness and feeling.
The choice of anesthetic method can be very complex, as patients will have to take into account both surgical factors and the advice of doctors and surgeons.
While there is little scientific evidence to support this idea, local anesthetic has many unfavorable side effects like confusion, dizziness, and nausea, which are not typically associated with regional anesthesia, typically making regional anesthesia a less dangerous choice.
www.mesotheliomasos.com /glossaryAnesthetic.php   (230 words)

  
 Dental Anesthetic Delivery System in Tucson AZ - The Wand ®
Discomfort from a dental shot is mostly due to the feeling of pressure created by the flow of dental anesthetic.
During the actual injection, the development of an anesthetic pathway combined with computer controlled constant flow assures that there is minimal awareness that the injection is even being given.
It's the flow of the anesthetic into the tissues of the mouth.
www.tucsonsmile.com /cosmetic-dentist/anesthetic.html   (293 words)

  
 Anesthetics for Dentistry Information | Business.com
Providers of anesthetics products and supplies for dentistry.
Distributor of anesthetic instruments for the medical industry.
Manufacturer of topical anesthetics and preventative products including fluorides in all configurations, fluoride trays, prophylaxis paste, and other products.
rd.business.com /index.asp?epm=s.1&bdcq=anesthetic&bdcr=1&bdcu=http://www.business.com/directory/health_care/dentistry/equipment_and_supplies/anesthetics/index.asp?partner=2662601&bdcp=&partner=2662601&bdcs=nwuuid-2662601-510E602C-922F-68AB-D107-4EC98A558728-ym   (91 words)

  
  Anesthetic definition - Medical Dictionary definitions of popular medical terms
Anesthetic: A substance that causes lack of feeling or awareness.
A local anesthetic causes loss of feeling in a part of the body.
A general anesthetic puts the person to sleep.
www.medterms.com /script/main/art.asp?articlekey=2247   (157 words)

  
  BioMed Central | Full text | Local anesthetic resistance in a pregnant patient with lumbosacral plexopathy
While similar cases of failure of regional anesthetics are often attributed to technical failure, the overall clinical presentation and history of this patient suggests a true resistance to local anesthetics.
Drasner and Rigler suggest that, in cases of truly "failed spinals," maldistribution of local anesthetic in the subarachnoid space may be the cause of failure [7].
Local anesthetic action is believed to be due to an interaction with the sixth segment of domain four of the alpha subunit (IV-S6), involving sites of phenylalanine and tyrosine amino acid residues [8].
www.biomedcentral.com /1471-2253/4/1   (2260 words)

  
  IUPUI - EHS Anesthetic Gas Safety Training
In dental offices, it is administered with oxygen, primarily as an analgesic (an agent that diminishes or eliminates pain in the conscious patient) and as a sedative to reduce anxiety.
Anesthetic gases are exhaled by recovering patients (who received inhalation anesthetics) as they breathe.
They include all fugitive anesthetic gases and vapors that are released into anesthetizing and recovery locations, from equipment used in administering anesthetics under normal operating conditions, as well as those gases that leak from the anesthetic gas scavenging system, or are exhaled by the patient into the workplace environment.
www.ehs.iupui.edu /AnesGasSafety/glossary.asp   (2371 words)

  
 Local Anesthetic Use In Children. Information on dental anesthesia, dosages, injection technique, and emergencies.
The potency of a local anesthetic is directly related to its lipid solubility, since 90% of the nerve cell membrane is composed of lipid.
An important requirement for administering a local anesthetic is for the dentist to be familiar with the manner in which the teeth are innervated.
When anesthetizing in the maxillary arch, the dentist should recall that the permanent first molar’s mesiobuccal root is innervated by fibers from the middle superior alveolar nerve branch, while the remaining roots are innervated by the posterior superior alveolar nerve branch.
dentalresource.org /topic38anesthesia.htm   (2079 words)

  
 Office of Animal Care and Compliance (OACC) : HSC SOM   (Site not responding. Last check: )
Because the anesthetics are eliminated from the blood by exhalation, with less reliance on drug metabolism to remove the drug from the body, there is less chance for drug-induced toxicity.
Anesthetic effects are seen within 15 minutes of administration and may last from 45 minutes to several hours, depending on the drug used.
Anesthetic death is common in animals that are not receiving supportive care.
hsc.unm.edu /som/research/acc/anesthetic_use_guidelines.shtml   (7191 words)

  
 Anesthetic Monitoring
In general, the volatile anesthetics; halothane, isoflurane, sevoflurane, and desflurane produce a dose-dependent decrease in arterial blood pressure and many anesthetists use this depression to assess the depth of anesthesia.
Adequate monitoring is needed even for brief anesthetic periods, during the transport of patients, and with sedation that might cause cardiovascular or respiratory complications.
In cases where the anesthetic management of a case needs to be defended, an anesthetic record is of enormous worth both as a reminder of the details of the individual cases and as evidence of the general standard of care given by the veterinary practice.
www.cvm.okstate.edu /courses/vmed5412/Lect012.htm   (3375 words)

  
 Anesthetic Circuits   (Site not responding. Last check: )
Anesthetic circuits deliver anesthetic gases to the patient and may or may not allow rebreathing of expired gases.
The large animal anesthetic circuit is primed by turning on the oxygen flow meter and setting the vaporizer dial to 4 or 5 % for several minutes prior to attachment to the endotracheal tube.
Priming of the anesthetic machine is usually done prior to induction of anesthesia using an injectable agent.
www.vetmed.wsu.edu /depts-anesthesia/_archive/equipment/circuits.htm   (2148 words)

  
 eMedicine - Local Anesthetic Agents, Infiltrative Administration : Article Excerpt by Mary L Windle
Variation in local anesthetic dose depends on the procedure, the degree of anesthesia required, and the individual patient's circumstances.
Infiltration anesthesia is accomplished with administration of the local anesthetic solution intradermally (ID), subcutaneously (SC), or submucosally across the nerve path that supplies the area of the body that requires anesthesia.
Adverse effects are usually caused by high plasma concentrations of a local anesthetic drug that result from inadvertent intravascular injection, excessive dose or rate of injection, delayed drug clearance, or administration into vascular tissue.
www.emedicine.com /proc/byname/Local-Anesthetic-Agents--Infiltrative-Administration.htm   (1140 words)

  
 Anesthetic Risk (Village Vet)
Anesthetic emergencies are rare, but when they occur, blood pressure is usually low which makes it difficult to find veins to deliver emergency drugs quickly.
While direct observation of the patient is at the foundation of anesthetic monitoring, we also use a pulse oximeter for many cases to supplement our observations.
Individualized anesthetic protocols: Of course every patient's drug doses are adjusted for body weight, age or any other factor that affects anesthetic drug doses.
www.vvh.com /anesthetic_risk.shtml   (908 words)

  
 Control of Waste Anesthetic Gases
Administering inhalant anesthetics by open drop (eg, periodically dripping liquid volatile anesthetic onto a gauze sponge) or insufflation (eg, delivery of a relatively high flow of anesthetic in oxygen into the trachea or pharynx through a catheter) techniques.
Measuring the concentration of anesthetic in the breathing zone of the most heavily exposed workers is the usual procedure.
After establishing procedures for control of anesthetic gases, the logical next step for veterinary clinics, hospitals, laboratories, and other institutions is the development of a consistent monitoring program for waste gases that is suitable, both qualitatively and economically, for the particular type of practice.
www.acva.org /professional/Position/waste.htm   (2145 words)

  
 Perioperative Cardiovascular Evaluation Update - VIII. Anesthetic
All anesthetic techniques and drugs are associated with known effects that should be considered in the perioperative plan.
If the local anesthetic block is less than satisfactory or cannot be used at all, monitored anesthesia care could result in an increased incidence of myocardial ischemia and cardiac dysfunction compared with general or regional anesthesia.
The venodilating and arterial dilating effects of nitroglycerin are mimicked by some anesthetic agents, so that the combination of agents may lead to significant hypotension and myocardial ischemia.
www.acc.org /qualityandscience/clinical/guidelines/perio/update/VIII_anesthetic.htm   (1881 words)

  
 EMLA Anesthetic Disc Chart   (Site not responding. Last check: )
However, it should not be used in infants under 1 month of age, or in children with rare conditions of congenital or idiopathic methemoglobinemia, or in infants under the age of 12 months who are receiving treatment with methemoglobin-inducing agents.
You can use the EMLA Anesthetic Disc for repeated procedures in the same place on his or her skin without the skin becoming permanently numb.
EMLA Anesthetic Disc (lidocaine 2.5% and prilocaine 2.5% cream) Topical Adhesive System and EMLA Cream (lidocaine 2.5% and prilocaine 2.5%) are indicated as topical anesthetics for use on normal intact skin for local analgesia (pain relief).
www.emla-us.com /apply/chart.htm   (531 words)

  
 BSCA Anesthetic
This combination of traits may make them susceptible to relative overdoses, if the anesthetic is given strictly by body weight or given too quickly without letting the dog settle down.
This gas anesthetic is commonly used today, and although it is expensive, its wide margin of safety compared to the older Metophane and Halothane, make it the drug of choice for most patients.
It is also associated with a "higher incidence of anesthetic complications and death than any other commonly used preanesthetic".
www.bsca.info /health/anesthetic.html   (1772 words)

  
 Baxter U.S. - Anesthetic Pharmaceuticals
Home > Products > Anesthesia > Anesthetic Pharmaceuticals
Baxter´s pharmaceutical products include the inhalation anesthetics SUPRANE (desflurane, USP), FORANE (isoflurane, USP), and SEVOFLURANE; BREVIBLOC (esmolol HCl) injection in vials, BREVIBLOC concentrate in ampules for dilution, BREVIBLOC PREMIXED (esmolol HCl in sodium chloride) injection, REVEX (nalmefene HCl) and a comprehensive line of multisource injectables including MIDAZOLAM HCl injection and PROPOFOL injectable emulsion 1%.
Use our search tool to find MSDS sheets for Baxter products.
www.baxter.com /products/anesthesia/anesthetic_pharmaceuticals   (73 words)

  
 Anesthetic - Page 1 - Champion Nishikigoi
4 items found in Anesthetic - Champion Nishikigoi
Protects customers' fish by reducing stress, promoting slime coat, removing Chlorine and Chloramine, neutrali...
Quin-Phos Anesthetic Solution (2-methylquinoline) is the next generation anesthetic for koi.
champkoi.com /ps/Medication-Anesthetic_25KOI43KOI43KOI0KOI0   (193 words)

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