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Topic: Angevin


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  Angevin - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
Angevin (IPA: [ˈæn.dʒɛ.vɪn]) is the name applied to the residents of Anjou, a former province of the Kingdom of France, as well as to the residents of Angers.
The original House of Anjou was the dynasty established by the viscounts and counts of Angers at the beginning of the 10th century.
The second Angevin dynasty, known also as the house of Capet-Anjou, began with Charles, made count (from 1360 the family were dukes) of the western French province of Anjou by his elder brother king Louis IX of France in 1246; they were members of the French ruling house of Capet.
en.wikipedia.org /wiki/Angevin   (898 words)

  
 Angevin Empire - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-11-07)
The Angevin Empire is a modern term applied retrospectively to the lands of Henry II of England, consisting of at their largest extent, the Kingdom of England and duchies or counties of Normandy, Anjou, Poitou, Maine, Gascony, Touraine, Béarn and Aquitaine; with Brittany, Wales, Toulouse, and Ireland held in vassalage to some degree.
The height of the Angevin Empire came during the reign of Richard I of England, an avid imperialist and unquestionable patriot of Christendom.
The fall of the Angevin empire can be traced to the capture and ransoming of Richard I by Leopold V of Austria and Henry VI of Germany.
en.wikipedia.org /wiki/Angevin_Empire   (962 words)

  
 Encyclopedia :: encyclopedia : Angevin   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-11-07)
Angevin is the name applied to three distinct medieval dynasties which originated as counts (from 1360, dukes) of the western French province of Anjou (of which angevin is the adjectival form), but later came to rule far greater areas including England, Hungary and Poland (see Angevin Empire).
The first Angevin dynasty, known from the 12th century as the Plantagenet dynasty, came (with its Lancastrian and Yorkist branches) to rule England (1154–1485), Normandy (1144–1204, 1346–1360 and 1415–1450), and Gascony and Guyenne (1153–1453), but lost Anjou itself to the French crown in 1206.
The second Angevin dynasty, known also as the house of Capet-Anjou, began with Charles, created count (from 1360 the family were dukes) of the western French province of Anjou by his elder brother king Louis IX of France in 1246; they were members of the French ruling house of Capet.
www.hallencyclopedia.com /Angevin   (515 words)

  
 [No title]   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-11-07)
Angevin is the name applied to two distinct medieval dynasties which originated as counts (from 1360, dukes) of the western French province of Anjou (of which angevin is the adjectival form), but later came to rule far greater areas including England, Hungary and Poland.
The first Angevin dynasty, known from the 12th century as the Plantagenet dynasty, came (with its Lancastrian and Yorkist branches) to rule England (1154-1485), Normandy (1144-1204, 1346-1360 and 1415-1450), and Gascony and Guyenne (1153-1453), but lost Anjou itself to the French crown in 1206.
The second Angevin dynasty, known also as the house of Capet-Anjou, began with Charles, created count of Anjou by his elder brother king Louis IX of France in 1246.
wikiwhat.com /encyclopedia/a/an/angevin.html   (220 words)

  
 Angevin
Angevin is the name applied to two distinct medieval dynasties -- the first English, the second French -- which originated as counts (from 1360, dukes) of what is now the western French province of Anjou (of which angevin is the adjectival form), but later came to rule far greater areas.
The first (or English) Angevin dynasty, known since the 12th century as the "Plantagenet dynasty" (with its Lancastrian and Yorkist branches), came to rule England (1154-1485), Normandy (1144-1204; 1346-1360; 1415-1450), and Gascony and Guyenne (1153-1453), but lost Anjou itself to the French crown in 1206.
The second (or French) Angevin dynasty began with Charles, created count of Anjou by his elder brother king Louis IX of France in 1246.
www.ebroadcast.com.au /lookup/encyclopedia/an/Angevin.html   (229 words)

  
 History of the Monarchy > The Angevins
The first Angevin King, Henry II, began the period as arguably the most powerful monarch in Europe, with lands stretching from the Scottish borders to the Pyrenees.
This was taken to an extreme by his son Richard, who spent only 10 months of a ten-year reign in the country due to his involvement in the crusades.
The last of the Angevin kings was John, whom history has judged harshly.
www.royal.gov.uk /output/Page60.asp   (313 words)

  
 Angevin. The Columbia Encyclopedia, Sixth Edition. 2001-05   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-11-07)
A nephew of Richard I and John became (1196) duke of Brittany as Arthur I. From his sister and her husband, Peter of Dreux, a Capetian noble who became Duke Peter I of Brittany, the subsequent rulers of Brittany issued.
The Breton line of the Angevins came to an end with the marriages of Anne of Brittany and her daughter to the kings of France.
The second house of Anjou was a cadet branch of the Capetians and originated with Charles, a younger brother of King Louis IX of France.
www.bartleby.com /65/an/Angevin.html   (644 words)

  
 Highbeam Encyclopedia - Search Results for Angevin   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-11-07)
Angevin ANGEVIN [Angevin] [Frof Anjou], name of two medieval dynasties originating in France.
He was the founder of the Angevin, or Plantagenet, line in England and one of the ablest and most remarkable of the English kings.
The Scriptorium of Margam Abbey and the Scribes of Early Angevin Glamorgan: Secretarial Administration in a Welsh Marcher Barony, c.
www.encyclopedia.com /SearchResults.aspx?Q=Angevin   (602 words)

  
 Sicilian Peoples: The Angevins - Best of Sicily Magazine - Angevins in Sicilian History
The term "Angevin" refers to both the "Plantagenet" dynasty of England from 1154 to 1399 (descendants of Geoffrey, Count of Anjou, and Matilda, daughter of Henry I) and the dynasty that ruled southern Italy from Naples beginning in the thirteenth century.
In the time of Frederick II and the Swabian rule of Sicily, France was ruled by the Capetians (so-called for their descent from Hugh Capet).
From this death was Italy's Angevin period born, in a dynastic change representing the ultimate form of papal hegemony.
www.bestofsicily.com /mag/art177.htm   (1523 words)

  
 Medieval Times - Angevin Kings of England during the period 1154-1199
Why did the Angevin holdings - which extended from the northern border of England to the Pyrenees at the end of the reign of Henry II - fail to survive as political entity?
This was, however, undermined by the internal and external struggles over power which made the Angevin period inherently unstable, until the death of Richard I in 1199 precipitated the breakup of the Empire.
The term "Angevin Empire" refers to the lands held by the family of the counts of Anjou.
medieval.etrusia.co.uk /angevin.php   (329 words)

  
 Angevin Naples part 1
Charles of Anjou arrived victorious in Naples in 1266 to begin the two centuries of Angevin rule of southern Italy, which established Naples as a European capital and continued the tradition of the southern monarchy whilst the rest of Italy was fragmenting into city communes and states.
On the negative side, the Neapolitans discovered that it was expensive to maintain a king and his court, especially as large sections of the population — principally the church and the wealthy — were exempt from taxation.
Robert, heir and third born son of Charles II (the first died and the second, Ludwig, took the cloth and was eventually canonized) and his sister were married to Sancia and Sancio, the children of King James of Sicily.
faculty.ed.umuc.edu /~jmatthew/naples/angevin1.html   (1128 words)

  
 HighBeam Encyclopedia - Angevin   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-11-07)
ANGEVIN [Angevin] [Fr.,=of Anjou], name of two medieval dynasties originating in France.
Their son became (1154) the first Angevin (or Plantagenet) king of England as Henry II.
Charles I's son became king of Hungary and Poland as Louis I. Hungary passed to Louis's daughter Mary and to her husband Sigismund (later Holy Roman emperor), and Poland passed to Ladislaus II of Poland, husband of Louis's daughter Jadwiga.
www.encyclopedia.com /html/A/Angevin.asp   (749 words)

  
 Hungary - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
Gradually Hungary, under the rule of the dynasty of the Árpáds, joined the greater West European civilizations.
Ruled by the Angevins since 1308, the Kingdom of Hungary slowly lost its control over territories later called Wallachia(1330) and Moldavia(1359).
The non-dynastic king Matthias Corvinus, son of János Hunyadi, ruled the Kingdom of Hungary from 1458 to 1490.
en.wikipedia.org /wiki/Hungary   (3584 words)

  
 The Angevin Dynasties
There were other Angevin dynasties to follow in France, as the English 'Plantagenets' continued in a futile attempt to regain the French domains during the Hundred Years' War.
The overseas initiatives of this second Angevin dynasty, created so-called 'Angevin dynasties' outside of France, particularly in Naples, that tended to divert the later Angevin line in France from its core domain of Anjou, in France.
The later Angevin princes were more interested in the conquest of the kingdom of Naples than in the defense of their duchy, and Louis II, as his father, Louis I, spent most of his life away from Anjou.
www.xenophongroup.com /montjoie/anjou.htm   (1801 words)

  
 Henri II's Angevin Empire
The formation of this 'Angevin Empire' is explained at a webpage on the Angevin dynasties [link to which is given at the bottom of this page].
Henri II d'Anjou's personal calim to the lands of his 'Angevin Empire' lasted through the succession of his son, Richard I 'Coeur de Lion' [the Lionhart], king of England (1189-1199).
This dismemberment of the remarkable Angevin Empire is covered in more detail in webpages on the War of Bouvines (1202-1214), the Saintonge War (1242), the Battle of Castillon (1453).
xenophongroup.com /montjoie/angevine.htm   (651 words)

  
 Angevin - Search Results - ninemsn Encarta
Angevin, dynasty of the counts of Anjou in north-western France founded by Fulk I the Red, under the Carolingian emperors of the 9th century, from...
John, who inherited the resentment against Angevin rule aroused by his father and brother, added to his troubles by his own actions.
Born March 5, 1133, at Le Mans, France, Henry became Duke of Normandy in 1151.
au.encarta.msn.com /Angevin.html   (99 words)

  
 Review: The Stones of Naples. Church Building in Angevin Italy, 1266-1343
Bruzelius’s research is firmly anchored in the architecture itself, with significant revisions of chronology and style, but her primary concern is to relate the buildings to the history of the kingdom.
One of the main clichés tackled by Bruzelius is the idea that Angevin rulers in a Francophile court introduced – above all under Charles of Anjou –; French architecture executed by French architects and builders.
Having already devoted years of research to St Denis and the court of Louis IX, the author is well aware that the traditional idea of a court style, one-sided, unchanging and dictated by the ruler, is a myth.
www.history.ac.uk /reviews/paper/bolgia.html   (2395 words)

  
 Angevin   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-11-07)
Term used to describe the English kings Henry II and Richard I (also known, with the later English kings up to Richard III, as the Plantagenets).
Angevin derives from Anjou, a region in northwestern France.
The Angevin Empire comprised the territories (including England) that belonged to the Anjou dynasty.
www.tiscali.co.uk /reference/encyclopaedia/hutchinson/m0020712.html   (216 words)

  
 BBC - History - King John and Richard I: Brothers and Rivals   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-11-07)
He hanged 28 hostages, sons of rebel Welsh chieftains in 1212 and starved to death William de Braose's wife and son in a royal prison.
Attempts to rehabilitate him have highlighted his administrative genius and his unstinting personal attention to his kingdom, but this view involves a fundamental misunderstanding of the nature of kingship in the Middle Ages.
He was the archetypical Angevin, the autocratic ruler of a vast territory.
www.bbc.co.uk /history/state/monarchs_leaders/john_01.shtml   (282 words)

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