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Topic: Angina pectoris


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In the News (Mon 15 Jul 19)

  
  Angina Pectoris
Angina Pectoris is a term for chest pain caused by an inadequate supply of blood and oxygen to the heart.
Angina may be more difficult to identify in some elderly patients when they have symptoms such as abdominal pain after eating (due to increased blood demand for digestion) or have back or shoulder pain (which may be thought to be due to arthritis).
Stable angina is characterized by predictable patterns of symptoms and periods of discomfort that occur during exercise or periods of stress.
www.labtestsonline.org /understanding/conditions/angina.html   (543 words)

  
 Cardiovascular Diseases - Angina Pectoris   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-11-06)
Angina pectoris occurs when the heart muscle (myocardium) does not receive an adequate amount of blood needed for a given level of work (insufficient blood supply is called ischemia).
An episode of angina does not indicate that a heart attack is occurring, or that a heart attack is about to occur.
Angina does indicate, however, that coronary heart disease is present and that some part of the heart is not receiving an adequate blood supply.
www.nyp.org /health/cd_rom_content/adult/cardiac/anginap.htm   (662 words)

  
 Angina Pectoris (Chest Pain) | AHealthyMe.com
Angina is temporary pain or discomfort in the chest that occurs when not enough oxygen-carrying blood reaches your heart.
Angina is most often a sign that you have heart disease, specifically a blockage of one or more of the main blood vessels supplying the heart muscle.
An angina attack occurs when the blocked vessel prevents adequate blood flow, or when there is spasm of the vessel leading to decreased blood flow to the heart muscle.
www.ahealthyme.com /topic/angina   (1298 words)

  
 Angina
Angina, or angina pectoris, is the medical term for chest pains behind the breastbone.
Angina pectoris is Latin for squeezing of the chest.
Angina is a specific type of pain in the chest caused by inadequate blood flow through the blood vessels (coronary vessels) of the heart muscle (myocardium).
www.mamashealth.com /angina.asp   (719 words)

  
 angina
The symptoms of angina include mild or severe pain, pressure, or discomfort in the chest, the pain is generally described as a feeling of a squeezing, strangling, heaviness, or suffocation sensation in the chest(8, 9).
Angina pectoris is a temporary part of the heart muscle not getting enough blood, whereas a heart attack occurs when some part of the heart is suddenly and permanently cut off from the blood supply which causes permanent damage to the heart muscle (8).
Angina pectoris is thought to be a precursor to approximately 40 percent of acute coronary events (1).
www.musc.edu /bmt737/spring2001/Kate/angina2.html   (1460 words)

  
 Heart Info - Angina Pectoris
Angina pectoris is a term that describes chest pain caused by myocardial ischemia - a condition in which the amount of oxygen getting to the heart muscle is insufficient.
Angina pectoris is a common manifestation of coronary artery disease.
Typically, angina is described as a "pressure" or "squeezing" pain that starts in the center of the chest and may spread to the shoulders or arms (most often on the left side, although either or both sides may be involved), the neck, jaw or back.
www.heartinfo.org /ms/ency/127/main.html   (1048 words)

  
 Angina Pectoris   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-11-06)
Angina pectoris is a condition in which the heart muscle does not receive enough blood (nutrients and oxygen) resulting in chest pain.
Variant angina also called Prinzmetal's angina differs from typical chronic stable angina pectoris in that it occurs almost exclusively when a person is at rest and does not follow a period of physical exertion or emotional stress.
Unstable angina pectoris is a clinical syndrome with symptoms between stable angina pectoris and acute myocardial infarction and perhaps sudden death.
www.medceu.com /tests/ANGINA.htm   (1814 words)

  
 Angina Pectoris
Angina pectoris is a syndrome characterized by chest pain resulting from an imbalance between oxygen supply and demand, and is most commonly caused by the inability of atherosclerotic coronary arteries to perfuse the heart under conditions of increased myocardial oxygen consumption.
Unstable angina pectoris is probably not a single entity, but a combination of syndromes which have been referred to by various names, such as preinfarction angina, impending myocardial infarction, progressive or crescendo angina, coronary insufficiency, new onset angina, etc.
The diagnosis of angina pectoris is established by obtaining a reliable description of the chest discomfort and its relationship to activity.
www.sh.lsuhsc.edu /fammed/outpatientmanual/angina.htm   (1580 words)

  
 Angina Pectoris   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-11-06)
Angina pectoris is not a disease, but rather a symptom of inadequate oxygen supply to the heart, which can result from a variety of conditions.
Angina is defined as pain or pressure in the chest, beneath the breastbone, that occurs when the heart is not getting enough oxygen.
Angina results when blood flow to the heart muscle is inadequate (causing a condition known as ischemia) due to a number of conditions.
www.cancergroup.com /angina.html   (212 words)

  
 THE MERCK MANUAL, Sec. 16, Ch. 202, Coronary Artery Disease   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-11-06)
Because the diagnosis of angina is usually primarily based on the patient's history, exercise testing in a patient with typical symptoms is generally used to determine functional and ECG response to graded stress (for exercise stress testing using radionuclide imaging, see Ch.
Angina may be confused with dyspnea, partly because of the sharp and reversible rise in LV filling pressure that often accompanies the ischemic attack.
Angina pectoris that is usually secondary to large vessel spasm and is characterized by discomfort at rest and by ST segment elevation during the attack.
www.merck.com /pubs/mmanual/section16/chapter202/202c.htm   (4008 words)

  
 Angina Pectoris
However, unlike the chest pain associated with a heart attack, the pain from angina usually goes away within a few minutes with rest or with the use of a cardiac prescription medication (i.e., nitroglycerin).
Angina pectoris (or simply angina) is recurring chest pain or discomfort that happens when some part of the heart does not receive enough blood.
Angina is a symptom of coronary heart disease (CHD), which occurs when arteries that carry blood to the heart become narrowed and blocked due to atherosclerosis.
www.healthsystem.virginia.edu /uvahealth/adult_cardiac/anginap.cfm   (694 words)

  
 Angina Pectoris
Angina pectoris is a symptom relating to heart muscle discomfort because of severe reduction of blood supply to that heart muscle.
The symptom of angina pectoris is always serious and means the blood supply to a portion of the heart muscle is compromised.
If you have had a diagnosis of angina pectoris made and your angina has changed in that it requires less of an activity to produce it then again one should inform your physician or cardiologist of it's change in nature.
www.cardiodoc.net /angina.htm   (927 words)

  
 AllRefer.com - angina pectoris (Pathology) - Encyclopedia
angina pectoris[anjI´nu pek´turis] Pronunciation Key, condition characterized by chest pain that occurs when the muscles of the heart receive an insufficient supply of oxygen.
Angina is a primary symptom of coronary artery disease.
The pain is usually experienced under or to the left of the sternum (breastbone) and radiates to the left shoulder and down the upper arm; less frequently, it spreads to the right shoulder.
reference.allrefer.com /encyclopedia/A/anginape.html   (391 words)

  
 Angina - Texas Heart Institute Heart Information Center   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-11-06)
Angina pectoris is a Latin phrase that means "strangling in the chest." Patients often say that angina is like a squeezing, suffocating, or burning feeling in their chest, but an episode of angina is not a heart attack.
Angina is the pain you feel when a diseased vessel in your heart (called a coronary artery) can no longer deliver enough blood to a part of your heart to meet its need for oxygen.
Angina attacks in men usually happen after the age of 30 and are nearly always caused by coronary artery disease (CAD).
www.tmc.edu /thi/angina.html   (1073 words)

  
 Sigmund Silber, MD - Angina pectoris
The term "Angina pectoris" does not include every "feeling of tightness in the chest," but automatically steers suspicion toward a diagnosis of coronary heart disease when the possibility of stenosis of the aortic valve is out of question.
The classic case of Angina pectoris is characterized by a stress-dependent, retrosternal feeling of pressure, lasting from seconds to several minutes; the sensation can radiate into the neck, lower jaw, left arm and back.
Angina pectoris is termed "unstable" when formerly stable Angina pectoris is experienced more often and/or more intensely without external causes (a change in blood pressure adjustment, omission of medication, increased psychosocial pressure).
www.sigmund-silber.com /english/cfp/ape.htm   (688 words)

  
 ICU-USA - Tour - Angina
Angina, formally named angina pectoris, ia acute pain in the chest, usually described as a feeling of tightness, strangling, heaviness or suffocation.
Angina is caused by a decrease in the supply of blood and oxygen to the heart.
Angina is an important warning sign indicating that the heart muscle is not receiving enough blood and oxygen.
www.icu-usa.com /tour/medical_conditions/angina.htm   (369 words)

  
 Angina Pectoris
Angina occurs when some part of the heart requires more oxygen than it can get from the blood reaching it through the coronary arteries.
If you still get angina attacks despite drug treatment and if there is angiographic evidence of advanced narrowing of coronary arteries, coronary angioplasty (dilating the narrowing in the coronary artery with a balloon) or coronary artery bypass surgery may be performed to restore a good blood flow to the heart muscle.
If your angina attacks become more severe, more frequent or more prolonged or occurring at rest with decreasing response to GTN tablets then you have what is called "unstable angina".
www.khayma.com /fawazakhras/Angina.htm   (780 words)

  
 Angina or Angina Pectoris   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-11-06)
Episodes of angina are usually brought on by activities or conditions that cause your heart to beat faster and work harder, such as physical exertion, mental or emotional stress, smoking, large meals or extreme temperatures.
Angina is only a temporary reduction of the flow of the blood to the heart; a heart attack is a sudden, permanent stopping of the flow of blood to the heart.
Angina is a symptom of heart disease, so the risk factors of angina are the same as the risk factors of heart disease.
www.besthearthealth.com /heart.nsf/diseaseswebview/angina   (919 words)

  
 MedizInfo®: Stabile Angina Pectoris
Schmerzen und ein Engegefühl in der Brust, Atemnot oder ein dumpfes Ziehen in der Herzgegend, das sind Anzeichen für eine Angina pectoris, oder auch Herzenge.
Angina pectoris ist eine ernst zu nehmende Erkrankung.
Molsidomin ist deshalb bei akuten Angina pectoris Anfällen nicht einsetzbar.
www.medizinfo.com /kardio/khk/angina_stabil.shtml   (1183 words)

  
 Angina Pectoris   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-11-06)
Angina pectoris is recurring chest pain or discomfort that happens when some part of the heart does not receive enough blood.
An episode of angina is not a heart attack and is not a signal that a heart attack is about to happen.
Angina pain means that some of the heart muscle is temporarily not getting enough blood, but the pain does NOT mean that the heart muscle is suffering irreversible, permanent damage.
www.umm.edu /cardiac/anginap.htm   (707 words)

  
 Angina Pectoris
Angina pectoris is the medical term for chest pain or discomfort due to coronary heart disease.  Angina is a symptom of a condition called myocardial ischemia. ; It occurs when the heart muscle (myocardium) doesn't get as much blood (hence as much oxygen) as it needs.
Angina also can occur in people with valvular heart disease, hypertrophic cardiomyopathy (this is an enlarged heart due to disease) or uncontrolled high blood pressure.  These cases are rare, though.
Typical angina is uncomfortable pressure, fullness, squeezing or pain in the center of the chest.  The discomfort also may be felt in the neck, jaw, shoulder, back or arm.  Many types of chest discomfort aren't related to angina.  Acid reflux (heartburn) and lung infection or inflammation are examples.
www.americanheart.org /presenter.jhtml?identifier=4472   (528 words)

  
 Angina pectoris   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-11-06)
Angina pectoris ist etwas, das nur ein Mensch, nicht aber ein Arzt feststellen kann, denn Angina pectoris bedeutet “Schmerz”.
Jeder Angina pectoris-Anfall stellt wegen der Gefahr, in einen Herzinfarkt übergehen zu können oder zu gefährlichen Herzrhythmusstörungen führen zu können einen Notfall dar.
Angina pectoris ist der Ausdruck einer koronaren Herzkrankheit.
www.h-wie-herz.de /Krankheiten/angina.html   (2196 words)

  
 eMedicine - Angina Pectoris : Article by Jamshid Alaeddini, MD
Angina decubitus is a variant of angina pectoris that occurs at night while the patient is recumbent.
Unstable angina is defined as new-onset angina (ie, within 2 mo of initial presentation) of at least class III severity, significant recent increase in frequency and severity of angina, or angina at rest.
In general, Prinzmetal angina and syndrome X are associated with excellent long-term prognoses.
www.emedicine.com /med/topic133.htm   (8308 words)

  
 Angina Pectoris course for nursing CEU and continuing ed   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-11-06)
Angina Pectoris (Angina) is a recurring pain or discomfort in the chest that
Angina pectoris is a condition in which the heart muscle does not receive
angina pectoris and acute myocardial infarction and perhaps sudden death.
www.nursingclasses.com /angina--nursing-ceu.html   (1537 words)

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