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Topic: Anglo-Saxon


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 Northumbrian (Anglo-Saxon) - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
Northumbrian was a dialect spoken in the Anglo-Saxon kingdom of Northumbria.
The dialect was spoken from the Humber in England to the Firth of Forth in Scotland.
During the Viking invasions of the 9th century, Northumbrian came under the influence from the languages of the Viking invaders.
en.wikipedia.org /wiki/Northumbrian_(Anglo-Saxon)

  
 Medieval Sourcebook: The Anglo-Saxon Dooms, 560-975
A ceorl's wergeld is by the Mercian law 200 shillings.
A ceorl's wergeld is 267 thrymsas by the Danish law.
It is whilom, in the laws of the English, that people and law went by ranks, and then were the counsellors of the nation of worship worthy, each according to his condition, eorl and ceorl, thegn and theoden.
www.fordham.edu /halsall/source/560-975dooms.html

  
 Anglo-Saxon Futhorc - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
The Anglo-Saxon Futhorc are a runic alphabet, extended from the Elder Futhark, consisting of 29, and later even 33 characters.
There are competing theories as to the origins of the Anglo-Saxon Futhorc.
Futhorc inscriptions are found for example on the Thames scramasax, in the Vienna Codex, in Cotton MS Otho B (†) and on the Ruthwell Cross.
en.wikipedia.org /wiki/Anglo-Saxon_Futhorc

  
 Mercian (Anglo-Saxon) - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
Mercian was spoken in the Anglo-Saxon kingdom of Mercia.
The dialect was spoken from East Anglia through the midlands to the Welsh border, with the Northumbrian dialect to the north and the West Saxon dialect to the south.
It was one of four distinct dialects of Old English, the other three were Kentish, Northumbrian and West Saxon.
en.wikipedia.org /wiki/Mercian_(Anglo-Saxon)

  
 The Avalon Project : Anglo-Saxon Law - Extracts From Early Laws of the English.
A ceorl's wergild is 266 thrymsas, that is 200 shillings by Mercian law....
The great bulk of the laws concern chiefly such questions as the practice of compurgation, ordeal, wergild, sanctity of holy places, persons, or things; the immunity of estates belonging to churches; and the tables of penalties for crimes, in their several aspects as offenses against the peace, the family, and the individual.
It was whilom, in the laws of the English, that people and law went by ranks, and then were the counsellors of the nation of worship worthy, each according to his condition, eorl and ceorl, thegen and theoden.
www.yale.edu /lawweb/avalon/medieval/saxlaw.htm

  
 ANGLO-SAXON LAW - LoveToKnow Article on ANGLO-SAXON LAW
(c) The more ancient documents of Anglo-Saxon law show us the individual not merely as the subject and citizen of a certain commonwealth, but also as a member of some group, all the fellows of which are closely allied in claims and responsibilities.
In the public law division it is chiefly the power, interests and privileges of the king that are dealt with, in roughly 93 paragraphs, while local administration comes in for 39 and purely economic and fiscal matter for 13 clauses.
The older law of real property, of succession, of contracts, the customary tariffs of fines, were mainly regulated by folk-right; the reeves employed by the king and great men were supposed to take care of local and rural affairs according to folk-right.
www.1911encyclopedia.org /A/AN/ANGLO_SAXON_LAW.htm

  
 Old English language - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
The language was further altered by the transition away from the runic alphabet (also known as futhorc) to the Latin alphabet, which was also a significant factor in the developmental pressures brought to bear on the language.
The second began when the Anglo-Saxons were converted to Christianity and Latin-speaking priests became widespread.
During this period it assimilated some aspects of the languages that it came in contact with, such as the Celtic languages and the two dialects of Old Norse from the invading Norsemen who were occupying and controlling the Danelaw in northern and eastern England.
en.wikipedia.org /wiki/Old_English   (2629 words)

  
 HUNTING - LoveToKnow Article on HUNTING
Hare hunting is essentially a quiet amusement; no hallooing at hounds nor whip-cracking should be permitted; nor should the field make any noise when a hare is found, for, being a timid animal, she might be headed into the hounds mouths.
With regard to the expenses of hunting, it is calculated that a master of hounds should be prepared to spend at the rate of 500 a year for every day in the week that his hounds are supposed to hunt.
Several packs which hunt within these limits are not supposed, however, to belor~g to the Shires, whereas a district of the Belvoir country is in Lincoinshire, and to hunt with the Belvoir is certainly understood to be hunting in the Shires.
www.1911encyclopedia.org /H/HU/HUNTING.htm   (3958 words)

  
 Anglo-Saxons - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
Woden, the Anglo-Saxon form of Odin, the clever one-eyed leader of the gods: Wednesday
Tiw, the Anglo-Saxon form of Tyr, the god of war: Tuesday
Thunor, the Anglo-Saxon form of Thor, the thunder god: Thursday
en.wikipedia.org /wiki/Anglo-Saxon   (3958 words)

  
 Anglo-Saxons - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
West Saxon writers regularly speak of their own nation as a part of the Angelcyn and of their language as Englisc, while the West Saxon royal family claimed to be of the same stock as that of Bernicia in the north.
Germanic peoples, including the Angles, Saxons, Frisians and Jutes, migrated to southern Britain, beginning after the end of Roman rule, though it is not known whether they substantially replaced the existing population.
The term Angli Saxones seems to have first come into use by Latin writers on the continent, nearly a century before Alfred's time, in the writings of Paul the Deacon, historian of the Lombards.
en.wikipedia.org /wiki/Anglo-Saxon   (2646 words)

  
 Anglo-Saxons - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
West Saxon writers regularly speak of their own nation as a part of the Angelcyn and of their language as Englisc, while the West Saxon royal family claimed to be of the same stock as that of Bernicia in the north.
The authority of the latter are disputed by the Saxon Church.
Besides Angles, Saxons and Jutes, Frisians and perhaps the Franks, are known to have taken part in the "invasions".
en.wikipedia.org /wiki/Anglo-Saxon   (17844 words)

  
 Anglo-Saxon religion - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
Since the Anglo-Saxon religion was cut short around the 8th century and there is a lack of written material, it is difficult and unjustifiable to ascribe to the Anglo-Saxon gods, about whom little is known other than their names, the same attributes and activities that are recorded for the gods in the Norse mythology.
Since Anglo-Saxon religion and its revival organizations are a subset of Heathenry in general, many of its central practices are also shared by other religions such as Asatru.
Anglo-Saxon religion is the religious practices and beliefs of the Angles, Saxons, and Jutes of pre-Christian England to about the 7th century AD.
en.wikipedia.org /wiki/Anglo-Saxon_mythology   (2198 words)

  
 ANGLO-SAXON LAW - LoveToKnow Article on ANGLO-SAXON LAW
of the Kentish laws, and Northumbrian dialectical peculiarities are also noticeable on some occasions, ANGLO-SAXON LAW
The direct influence of Roman law was not great during the Saxon period: we notice neither the transmission of important legal doctrines, chiefly through the medium of Visigothic codes, nor the continuous stream of Roman tradition in local usage.
There may be the folk-right of West and East Saxons, of East Angles, of Kentish men, Mercians, Northumbrians, Danes, Welshmen, and these main folk-right divisions remain even when tribal kingdoms disappear and the people is concentrated in one or two realms.
www.1911encyclopedia.org /A/AN/ANGLO_SAXON_LAW.htm   (2198 words)

  
 Anglo-Saxons.net : Timeline: 757-796
The fall of the South Saxons to Offa is also neatly demonstrated in the fact that an Osmund, king of the South Saxons, issued his own charter in 770 ( S 49) but was reduced to witnessing a charter of Offa as ealdorman in 772 ( S 108).
It may be that Coenwulf resumed control over the East Saxons in 798, as he did over the people of Kent and shortly after that over the East Angles, but from charters we learn of another East Saxon king, Sigered, in 811.
Northumbrian politics were not notably peaceful earlier in the 8th century -- Osred may have been murdered in 716, and Ceolwulf was captured and tonsured in 731 -- but the killings and quick reverses of fortune do seem to escalate out of all control in the second half of the 8th century.
www.anglo-saxons.net /hwaet?do=seek&query=757-796   (2198 words)

  
 Anglo-saxon names - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
Anglo-Saxon names were often made up of two words combined.
In Tolkien's The Lord of the Rings, the culture of the Rohirrim is based on that of the Anglo-Saxons, and so Theoden, their king, is referred to as "Theoden King", rather than "King Theoden".
For example, King Æþelred's name was derived from "æþel", for "noble", and "ræd", for "counsel".
en.wikipedia.org /wiki/Anglo-saxon_names   (2198 words)

  
 Anglo-Saxons - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
Remnants of the Anglo-Saxon gods remain in the English language names for days of the week:
Tiw, the Anglo-Saxon equivalent of Tyr, the god of war: Tuesday
Still more curious is the fact that West Saxon writers regularly speak of their own nation as a part of the Angelcyn and of their language as Englisc, while the West Saxon royal family claimed to be of the same stock as that of Bernicia in the north.
en.wikipedia.org /wiki/Anglo-Saxon   (2198 words)

  
 Norse mythology - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
Norse mythology was a collection of beliefs and stories shared by North Germanic tribes, not a revealed religion, in the sense that there was no claim to a divinely inspired scripture.
Norse mythology, Viking mythology or Scandinavian mythology refer to the pre-Christian religion, beliefs and legends of the Scandinavian people, including those who settled on Iceland, where the written sources for Norse mythology were assembled.
The mythology was transmitted orally during most of the Viking Age, and our knowledge about it is mainly based on the Eddas and other medieval texts written down after Christianisation.
www.kernersville.us /project/wikipedia/index.php/Scandinavian_mythology   (4024 words)

  
 Giant (mythology) article - Giant (mythology) Giant (disambiguation) legendary monster races cultures Oscar - What-Means.com
Norse and Anglo-Saxon mythology are also rich in tales of giants, which seem there to be a separate race akin to the gods, and strove often with Thor.
In the mature form of this mythology recorded in the Edda poetry and prose, giants inter-marry with the gods and are the origin of most of the monsters in Nordic mythology (e.g., the Fenris Wolf), so relations between the Aesir and the giants are sometimes cordial and sometimes adversarial.
In Germanic mythologies (see Norse mythology), giants (Jotuns) are often opposed to the gods.
www.what-means.com /encyclopedia/Giant   (546 words)

  
 Anglo-Saxons - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
West Saxon writers regularly speak of their own nation as a part of the Angelcyn and of their language as Englisc, while the West Saxon royal family claimed to be of the same stock as that of Bernicia in the north.
We need not doubt that the Angles and the Saxons were different nations originally; but from the evidence it seems likely that they had practically coalesced in very early times, perhaps even before their invasion of Great Britain.
At all events the term Angli Saxones seems to have first come into use by Latin writers on the continent, nearly a century before Alfred's time, in the writings of Paul the Deacon, historian of the Lombards.
en.wikipedia.org /wiki/Anglo-Saxon   (2262 words)

  
 Mercia - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
The power of the West Saxons under Egbert was rising during this period, however, and in 825 Egbert defeated the Mercian king Beornwulf (who had overthrown Ceolwulf in 823) at Ellendun.
The Danes appointed a Mercian thegn, Ceolwulf II, as king in 873 while the remaining independent section of Mercia was ruled by Aethelred, called an ealderman, not a king.
At some point before the accession of Æthelbald, the Mercians conquered the region around Wroxeter, known to the Welsh as "The Paradise of Powys." Elegies written in the persona of its dispossessed rulers record the sorrow at this loss.
en.wikipedia.org /wiki/Mercia   (2262 words)

  
 Anglo-Saxon literature - Hutchinson encyclopedia article about Anglo-Saxon literature
All content on this website, including dictionary, thesaurus, literature, geography, and other reference data is for informational purposes only.
This information should not be considered complete, up to date, and is not intended to be used in place of a visit, consultation, or advice of a legal, medical, or any other professional.
encyclopedia.farlex.com /Anglo-Saxon+literature   (61 words)

  
 Anglo-Saxons - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
Anglo-Saxon literature (or Old English literature) encompasses literature written in Old English during the 600-year Anglo-Saxon period of Britain, from the mid-5th century to the Norman Conquest of 1066.
From that time until the 9th century, they coalesced into a single people, the Anglo-Saxons, which in turn formed the basis for the modern day English country, people, language and culture.
West Saxon writers regularly speak of their own nation as a part of the Angelcyn and of their language as Englisc, while the West Saxon royal family claimed to be of the same stock as that of Bernicia in the north.
en.wikipedia.org /wiki/Anglo-Saxon   (2223 words)

  
 Anglo-Saxon literature - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
Anglo-Saxon literature (or Old English literature) encompasses literature written in Anglo-Saxon (Old English) during the 600-year Anglo-Saxon period of Britain, from the mid-5th century to the Norman Conquest of 1066.
J.R.R. Tolkien was an influential scholar of Anglo-Saxon literature.
His best known work is Sermo ad Anglos in which he blames the sins of the British for the Viking invasions.
en.wikipedia.org /wiki/Anglo-Saxon_literature   (3609 words)

  
 Anglo-Saxons - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
Still more curious is the fact that West Saxon writers regularly speak of their own nation as a part of the Angelcyn and of their language as Englisc, while the West Saxon royal family claimed to be of the same stock as that of Bernicia in the north.
Besides Angles, Saxons and Jutes, Frisians and perhaps the Franks, are known to have taken part in the "invasions".
In recent times, some historians have taken issue with the notion of a "Saxon conquest", claiming that there is a marked lack of archaeological evidence for a major invasion.
en.wikipedia.org /wiki/Anglo-Saxon   (3609 words)

  
 Kings
Kings of Navarre family tree This is a Family tree of the Kings of Navarre from Sancho I of Navarre until the acession o...
Kings County, Nova Scotia Kings County is a Nova Scotia.
Kings Beach, California Kings Beach is a town located in 2000 census, the town had a total population of 4,037.
www.brainyencyclopedia.com /topics/kings.html   (3609 words)

  
 ANGLO-SAXON LAW - LoveToKnow Article on ANGLO-SAXON LAW
of the Kentish laws, and Northumbrian dialectical peculiarities are also noticeable on some occasions, ANGLO-SAXON LAW
The direct influence of Roman law was not great during the Saxon period: we notice neither the transmission of important legal doctrines, chiefly through the medium of Visigothic codes, nor the continuous stream of Roman tradition in local usage.
To the first division belong the laws of the Kentish kings, ^thelberht, Hlothhere and Eadric, Withraed; those of Ine of Wessex, of Alfred, Edward the Elder, ^Ethelstan,1 Edmund, Edgar, /Ethelred and Canute; the treaty between Alfred and Guthrum and the so-called treaty between Edward and Guthrum.
www.1911encyclopedia.org /A/AN/ANGLO_SAXON_LAW.htm   (3609 words)

  
 Saxon
Saxon, Wisconsin Saxon is a town located in 2000 census, the town had a total population of 350.
Saxon, South Carolina Saxon is a town located in 2000 census, the town had a total population of 3,707.
Saxon Shore The Saxon Shore is the collective name given to a series of Roman occupation of Britain.
www.brainyencyclopedia.com /topics/saxon.html   (3609 words)

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