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Topic: Annie Jump Cannon


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In the News (Wed 16 Jan 19)

  
  Annie Jump Cannon Summary
Annie Jump Cannon was born in Dover, Delaware, on December 11, 1863, the daughter of Wilson Lee Cannon and Mary Elizabeth Jump Cannon.
Annie Jump Cannon was born in Dover, Delaware, in 1863.
Cannon was the most famous female astronomer of her lifetime and was called the "Census Taker of the Sky." Cannon's successes inspired other women to pursue astronomical investigations, despite gender biases demonstrated by many male astronomers.
www.bookrags.com /Annie_Jump_Cannon   (0 words)

  
  Upto11.net - Wikipedia Article for Annie Jump Cannon
Annie Jump Cannon (December 11, 1863 – April 13, 1941), US astronomer, was born to shipbuilder and state senator, Wilson Cannon, and his second wife, Mary Jump, in Dover, Delaware.
In 1896, Cannon was hired by Professor Edward Charles Pickering, director of the Harvard College Observatory, to catalogue variable stars and classify the spectra of Southern stars.
On average, Cannon classified three stars a minute in sparsely populated regions of the sky, and her speed was half that for denser regions of the sky.
upto11.net /generic_wiki.php?q=annie_jump_cannon   (519 words)

  
 Annie Jump Cannon
Annie Jump Cannon, the first astronomer to classify the heavens systematically, was born December 11, 1863 in Dover, Delaware, U.S.A. She was educated at Wellesley College in Wellesley, Massachusetts and Radcliffe College in Cambridge, Massachusetts.
Cannon continued her work and between 1925 and 1949, she published The Henry Draper Extension so that the number of stars cataloged by her during her lifetime reached about 350,000.
Annie Jump Cannon died on April 13, 1941 in Cambridge, Massachusetts.
www.distinguishedwomen.com /biographies/cannon.html   (303 words)

  
 Annie Jump Cannon: Theorist of Star Spectra
Annie Jump Cannon was the eldest of three daughters of Wilson Cannon, a Delaware shipbuilder and state senator, and his second wife, Mary Jump.
Annie's mother taught her the constellations and stimulated her interest in astronomy.
It was left to Annie Jump Cannon to continue, beginning with an examination of bright southern hemisphere stars.
www.sdsc.edu /ScienceWomen/cannon.html   (0 words)

  
 Person of the Week: Annie Jump Cannon
Annie Jump Cannon, Class of 1884, astronomer extraordinaire, toward the end of her life said "In troubled days it is good to have something outside our planet, something fine and distant for comfort."
Cannon was born in Dover, Delaware, December 11, 1863.
Cannon was the first woman to be awarded the National Academy of Science's Draper Gold Medal (1931).
www.wellesley.edu /Anniversary/cannon.html   (0 words)

  
 Delaware History Online - Hall of Fame - Annie Jump Cannon
As a child living on State Street in Dover, Annie Jump Cannon loved to stargaze from her roof, and was fascinated by sunlight as it passed through the prisms of her mother's candelabras.
Annie Cannon took courses at the Dover Academy and then entered Wellesley College, becoming one of Delaware's first young women to attend college.
It should be said that we are indebted to Miss Annie Jump Cannon of the Harvard Observatory, for the faithful, able, and extensive work of examining the photographs upon which this catalogue is based, and for the resulting description of the individual spectra.
www.hsd.org /DHE/DHE_who_jump-cannon.htm   (584 words)

  
 World of Earth Science | Cannon, Annie Jump (1863-1941)
Annie Jump Cannon developed a stellar classification system that is considered by many astronomers to be the foundation of stellar spectroscopy.
Born in Dover, Delaware, Annie Jump Cannon was encouraged by her mother in the study of astronomy from an early age.
Cannon was the first woman to receive a doctor of astronomy degree from Groningen University (1921) and an honorary doctorate from Oxford University (1925).
science.enotes.com /earth-science/cannon-annie-jump/print   (597 words)

  
 Annie Jump Cannon   (Site not responding. Last check: )
Annie Jump Cannon was born in Dover, Delaware, on December 11, 1863.
After her mother's death in 1894, Annie returned to Wellesley as an assistant in the physics department and became a "special student" of astronomy at Radcliffe.
Annie Jump Cannon died in Cambridge, Massachusetts, on April 13, 1941.
www.robinsonlibrary.com /science/astronomy/biography/cannon.htm   (464 words)

  
 Annie Jump Cannon   (Site not responding. Last check: )
Annie Jump Cannon (1863-1941) was een Amerikaans astronome, werkzaam bij de Harvard-sterrenwacht.
Cannon bestudeerde honderdduizenden glasplaten met spectra van sterren.
Het systeem van Annie Jump Cannon is nog altijd in gebruik.
www.guajara.com /wiki/nl/wikipedia/a/an/annie_jump_cannon.html   (154 words)

  
 Reference.com/Encyclopedia/Annie Jump Cannon
Annie Jump Cannon (December 11, 1863 – April 13, 1941) was an American astronomer whose cataloguing work was instrumental in the development of contemporary stellar classification.
She was born to shipbuilder and state senator Wilson Lee Cannon, and his second wife, Mary Elizabeth Jump, they lived together in Dover, Delaware.
In 1880 she was sent to Wellesley College, Massachusetts, one of the top academic schools for women in the U.S. The cold winter climate in the area led to repeated infections, and in one she was stricken with scarlet fever.
www.reference.com /browse/wiki/Annie_Jump_Cannon   (527 words)

  
 ACannon
Annie Jump Cannon was the eldest child of Wilson Lee Cannon, a successful ship-builder and state senator, and Mary Elizabeth, his second wife.
Cannon’s duties included cataloguing variable stars and classifying the spectra of stars in the southern hemisphere for the Henry Draper Catalogue project, the counterpart to Maury with the northern hemisphere.
Possibly due to her deafness, Cannon was “recognized even during her lifetime as the world’s expert in identifying and classifying stars, with incredible accuracy and speed.” By the time of her death, she had classified up to 350,000 stars, at a rate of up to 300 per hour.
www.womanastronomer.com /acannon.htm   (561 words)

  
 Tolerance.org: WOMEN IN SCIENCE: Annie Jump Cannon
Cannon assigned more than a quarter million stars to the heavens in the Henry Draper Catalogue, the bible of spectral reference books.
Cannon's series of spectral classifications — O, B, A, F, G, K and M — remains in place today, as does her mnemonic device, "Oh, Be A Fine Girl — Kiss Me!" (Other variants exist now, too, but working astronomers still rely on this phrase to remember spectral classifications.)
Other astronomical luminaries followed and eclipsed Cannon, women like Cecelia Payne-Gaposchkin, who in 1925 was the first person, male or female, to be awarded a Ph.D. in astronomy from Radcliffe or Harvard and who went on to be the first woman to be named a full professor at Harvard.
www.tolerance.org /news/article_tol.jsp?id=1176   (666 words)

  
 Cannon,Annie Jump | UK Resource Centre for Women in SET
Annie Jump Cannon was the eldest of three daughters of Wilson Cannon, a Delaware shipbuilder and state senator, and his second wife, Mary Jump.
Annie's mother taught her the constellations and stimulated her interest in astronomy.
It was left to Annie Jump Cannon to continue, beginning with an examination of bright southern hemisphere stars.
www.setwomenresource.org.uk /en/role_models/pioneers/cannon_annie_jump   (540 words)

  
 Biography - Annie Cannon
It was not until 1894, however, a decade after her graduation from Wellesley, that Annie Cannon returned for graduate study in astronomy and physics, first at Wellesley and, in 1895, at Radcliffe.
When Miss Cannon was appointed curator of astronomical photographs at the observatory in 1911, she began the vitally important project in stellar demography of classifying stars down to the ninth magnitude, using objective prism plates taken by Pickering.
Between 1918 and 1937, Annie Cannon was awarded six honorary doctoral degrees, but the one that probably meant the most to her came in April of 1925, when Oxford University made her the first woman to receive an honorary doctorate from that illustrious institution.
physics.gmu.edu /~jevans/astr103/CourseNotes/Text/cannon.htm   (508 words)

  
 Annie Cannon and the 'Computers'   (Site not responding. Last check: )
In 1897 Annie Jump Cannon (1863-1941) was hired by Pickering to classify the spectra of stars of the southern hemisphere.
Cannon noticed that stellar temperature was the principal distinguishing feature among different spectra and combined the previous classification schemes into a simplified scheme.
Cannon personally classified every stellar spectrum that appears in the HD Catalogue, though she relied on a team of assistants to record her classifications and organize the records.
astro.wku.edu /astr106/cannon.html   (441 words)

  
 Postbellum America
Cannon was born on December 11,1863, in Dover,Delaware,and was the eldest child of prosperous ship-builder,merchant,and state senator Wilson Lee Cannon and his wife,Mary Elizabeth.
Cannon after doing this for some time began to notice that she could do this in a different way.The way she did it was, she changed Flamings classes,did away with Maurys line width,and then inserted numbers to make subclasses inside a spectrum.Cannon had a system which enabled her to classify over 1,122 different stars.
One of Cannon's good friends said that her work is a real treasure house of info-on stellar spectrum.Cannon's system was so easy to use it was adopted by many Universities across the nation.
www.uncp.edu /home/canada/work/allam/18661913/history/science.htm   (2518 words)

  
 Annie Jump Cannon   (Site not responding. Last check: )
Annie's mother died in 1894 so Annie returned to Wellesley as an assistant in the physics department and became a "special student" in astronomy at Radcliffe.
Annie is the best known for completing a bibliography of about 200,000 variable stars.
Annie was born in Dover Delaware on December 11.
www.rutgersprep.org /~kendall/7thgrade/cycleC_2005_06/cycle_C_scientists/ac2/5_jumpAC.html   (242 words)

  
 Search: Annie Jump Cannon
Annie Jump Cannon was the eldest of three daughters of Wilson Cannon,...
It was left to Annie Jump Cannon to continue, beginning with an examination of...
At the tender age of sixteen, Annie Jump Cannon was one of the first...
www.valentine.com /webmkt.valent/search/web/Annie%2BJump%2BCannon/-/-/1/-/-/-/1/-/-/-/-/-/-/-/-/-/-/-/-/-/-/-/-/-/-/-/-/-/-/-/-/-/-/-/-/-/-/-/-/-/-/-/-/-/-/-/-/-/-/-/-/-/302349/right   (188 words)

  
 Annie Jump Cannon - Picture - MSN Encarta
Annie Jump Cannon - Picture - MSN Encarta
American astronomer Annie Jump Cannon served as curator of astronomical photographs at the Harvard College Observatory from 1911 until 1938.
Considered the first great woman astronomer, she became well known for classifying more than 350,000 stars by the spectra of their light.
encarta.msn.com /media_461523483/Annie_Jump_Cannon.html   (50 words)

  
 Annie Jump Cannon   (Site not responding. Last check: )
Annie Jump Cannon, the first astronomer to classify the heavens systematically, was born December 11, 1863 in Dover, Delaware, U.S.A. She was educated at Wellesley College in Wellesley, Massachusetts and Radcliffe College in Cambridge, Massachusetts.
Cannon continued her work and between 1925 and 1949, she published The Henry Draper Extension so that the number of stars cataloged by her during her lifetime reached about 350,000.
Annie Jump Cannon died on April 13, 1941 in Cambridge, Massachusetts.
dbois.8media.org /cannon.html   (303 words)

  
 Pickering, Annie Jump Cannon, The Harvard Computers   (Site not responding. Last check: )
A print of this HCO photograph was found in an album that had once belonged to Annie Jump Cannon.
The women were identified by comparing the print to other HCO photographs on which Margaret Harwood or Annie Jump Cannon had noted the names.
Then comes Annie Jump Cannon (BA Wellesley 1884), who at that time was about halfway through classifying stellar spectra for the Henry Draper Catalogue.
cannon.sfsu.edu /~gmarcy/cswa/history/pick.html   (514 words)

  
 Disability Studies, Temple U.: December 11: Annie Jump Cannon (1863-1941) and Matilda Ann Aston (1873-1947)
December 11: Annie Jump Cannon (1863-1941) and Matilda Ann Aston (1873-1947)
Annie Jump Cannon (portrait at right) was born in Dover, Delaware, where, as a girl, she learned the names of constellations from her mother.
Cannon died in 1941, in Cambridge, and her papers are in the Harvard University Archives.
disstud.blogspot.com /2006/12/december-11-annie-jump-cannon-1863.html   (929 words)

  
 Annie Jump Cannon
Annie Jump Cannon was born on December 13, 1863.
Wilson Cannon was a shipbuilder before he was elected to the Delaware State Senate.
Annie was partially deaf as a result of scarlet fever that she got while at Wellesley.
ephemeris.sjaa.net /0612/f.html   (663 words)

  
 National Women's Hall of Fame - Women of the Hall
Cannon was an assistant at the Harvard Observatory beginning in 1896, and working with Williamina Fleming, she undertook a continuation of the project of recording, classifying and cataloging all stars down to the ninth magnitude.
Cannon became curator of astronomical photographs of the Observatory in 1911 and professor of astronomy in 1938.
Cannon was a women's suffrage advocate and a member of the National Women's Party.
www.greatwomen.org /women.php?action=viewone&id=33   (259 words)

  
 AllRefer.com - Annie Jump Cannon (Astronomy, Biography) - Encyclopedia
Dover, Del. In 1897 she became an assistant in the Harvard College Observatory, where (1911–38) she was astronomer and curator of astronomical photographs.
Recognizing that spectra of many stars had been photographed in the second half of the 19th cent., Cannon classified more than 500,000 stars, in the process publishing many papers on the subject.
One of the most significant achievements in 20th-century astronomy and the basis for contemporary theoretical understanding of stellar evolution, the catalog, named after its patron Henry Draper, is still in use.
reference.allrefer.com /encyclopedia/C/Cannon-A.html   (274 words)

  
 Cannon, Annie Jump   (Site not responding. Last check: )
Cannon was born in Dover, Delaware, and studied at Wellesley and Radcliffe colleges.
She spent her career at the Harvard College Observatory, as assistant 1896-1911, curator of astronomical photographs 1911-38, and astronomer and curator 1938-40.
Stars in the O, B, A group are white or blue, those in the F, G group yellow, those in the K group orange, and those in the M, R, N, S group red.
www.cartage.org.lb /en/themes/Biographies/MainBiographies/C/Cannon/1.html   (227 words)

  
 Innovative Women - Delaware   (Site not responding. Last check: )
Annie’s mother, Mary Jump, taught her constellations and this made Annie interested in astronomy.
Annie developed a system to classify stars into spectral classes that is still used today.
Annie’s career lasted 40 years and over this time Annie accomplished many great things and received many awards for her work.
epics.ecn.purdue.edu /abiwt/work/GAW/Delaware.html   (125 words)

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