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Topic: Anthony McAuliffe


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In the News (Sat 16 Dec 17)

  
 Anthony McAuliffe - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
According to various accounts from those present, when McAuliffe was told of the German demand for surrender he said "Aww, nuts".
Harper had to explain the meaning of the word to the Germans.
Some sources have suggested that McAuliffe's initial remark was in rather stronger language.
en.wikipedia.org /wiki/Anthony_McAuliffe   (418 words)

  
 General Anthony McAuliffe
Anthony McAuliffe is best known for one word - "Nuts." This came about when he was acting commander of the 101st Airborne Division during the Battle of the Bulge in World War 11.
Anthony Clement McAuliffe was Born in Washington, DC on July 2, 1898.
Anthony McAuliffe became Commander in Chief of the U.S. Army in Europe in 1955, when he was promoted to General.
www.geocities.com /Athens/Sparta/1512/fame_anthony.html   (284 words)

  
 Military.com Content
In December 1944, during the siege of Bastogne, Belgium, McAuliffe was acting commander of the 101st in Gen. Maxwell D. Taylor’s absence.
The Americans had been holding the Belgian town "at all costs," and on Dec. 22, Gen. McAuliffe received the encouraging news that the 4th Armored Division was beginning its drive north to relieve the 101st.
McAuliffe continued to serve on active duty, including assignments as Head of the Army Chemical Corps, Commander, 7th Army, and Commander-In-Chief of the U.S. Army, Europe, until his 1956 retirement.
www.military.com /Content/MoreContent/1,12044,ML_mcauliffe_bkp,00.html   (380 words)

  
 Christa McAuliffe
The wife of Steven McAuliffe of Concord, New Hampshire, Sharon Christa McAuliffe (nee Corrigan) was a 37-year old high school social studies teacher in 1984 when she was selected from more than 11,000 applicants to become the first teacher in space.
NASA selected McAuliffe for this position in the summer of 1984 and in the fall she took a year- long leave of absence from teaching, during which time NASA would pay her salary, and trained for an early 1986 Shuttle mission.
It is in part because of the excitement over Christa McAuliffe's presence on the Challenger that the accident had such a significant impact on the nation.
www.geocities.com /Athens/Sparta/1512/fame_christa.html   (558 words)

  
 DefenseLINK News: Bastogne Rolls Out Red Carpet for Battle of Bulge Vets
Anthony McAuliffe issued when Adolph Hitler called for his surrender here 60 years ago.
McAuliffe, in temporary command of the 101st Airborne Division during the battle, inspired his troops to a heroic stand that helped stop Germany's last major counteroffensive of the war in Europe.
Hours after McAuliffe's refusal to surrender, the skies cleared and Allied forces were able to airdrop reinforcements and launch air attacks on German tanks.
www.defenselink.mil /news/Dec2004/n12182004_2004121802.html   (1074 words)

  
 Wing Commander CIC Forums - View Single Post - 2628 - An officers beginning
Anthony tried to reply but couldn’t find the right words to respond with, “Sir I was with those other cadets when they lit the fire crackers.
Anthony looked at the data pad again for the hundredth time, making sure that he was reading the data pad correctly.
Anthony sat in the shuttle’s seat as he continuously looked between the data pad and outside the view port.
www.crius.net /zone/showpost.php?p=285531&postcount=1   (2274 words)

  
 Personalities and Commanders
TONY is B.G. Anthony McAuliffe, who was divisional artillery commander, then became deputy division commander after the death of General Don F. Pratt in a D-Day glider crash.
McAuliffe's place in world history was assured when he replied "Nuts!" to a formal German surrender ultimatum on 22 December, 1944.
It was Harry who suggested that Tony McAuliffe word his formal reply to the German surrender ultimatum with his original verbal reaction:"Nuts!" Kinnard remained in the Army, attained the rank of general and commanded the First Cavalry Division in Vietnam in 1965.
www.101airborneww2.com /personalities.html   (2680 words)

  
 Belgium: Bastogne recalls Battle of the Bulge - at worldbookers.com   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-09-05)
For 60 years, this rural town in southeast Belgium has been tied to the United States by bonds forged in the fire and fury of the Battle of the Bulge when the locals and their American defenders stood in the path of a German onslaught during the bitter winter of 1944.
McAuliffe's one-word rebuff -- "Nuts!" -- ensured Bastogne's place in military legend and the town's continued resistance earned the allied forces time to regroup and repulse Hitler's last offensive.
A Sherman tank dominates the town square, which is named after McAuliffe and surrounded by cafes, including one that serves a locally brewed strong ale called "Airborne" that's served in a mug shaped like a WWII U.S. army helmet.
www.worldbookers.com /news/news_belgium_bastogne_recalls_350.html   (1052 words)

  
 TIMOTHY ANTHONY MCAULIFFE (1862-1913)   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-09-05)
The informant was a McAuliffe from 4049 Michigan Ave.
According to family sources, “Tim drank to excess and was killed by a train on one of his benders.” His death certificate states that he died on the tracks of the NW El RR at 3:00 a.m.
His obituary: “The sudden death of Timothy A. McAuliffe, son of Jeremiah and Catherine McAuliffe and beloved father of Jeremiah, Elizabeth and Cornelius McAuliffe, which occurred Monday, December 2, came as a great blow to his relatives and many friends.
www.city-net.com /~alimhaq/mca-dowd/son_2.html   (612 words)

  
 Anthony McAuliffe -- Facts, Info, and Encyclopedia article   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-09-05)
For his actions, he was awarded the (A United States military decoration for meritorious service in wartime duty of great responsibility) Distinguished Service Medal.
He returned to Europe as Commander of the (Click link for more info and facts about Seventh Army) Seventh Army in 1953, and Commander-in-Chief of the United States Army in Europe in 1955.
He resided in (Click link for more info and facts about Chevy Chase, Maryland) Chevy Chase, Maryland until his death on August 11, 1975, and is buried along with his wife and son in (Click link for more info and facts about Arlington National Cemetery) Arlington National Cemetery.
www.absoluteastronomy.com /encyclopedia/a/an/anthony_mcauliffe1.htm   (389 words)

  
 2628 - An officers beginning - Wing Commander CIC Forums
Anthony arrived late after a long night at the bar in the rec room after the Flying Tiger’s won for the most successful missions among the four squadrons onboard the Hibernia.
Anthony was about to stand up and head to the barracks for nap with he saw someone put a mug of a hot steaming drink for him.
Anthony rarely see members from the Silver Arrows squadron and the last time he saw any of them was at welcome party where he met the Silver Arrows CO, Major Shauna O’Brian and several of the other pilots from the squadron.
www.crius.net /zone/showthread.php?t=18727   (13497 words)

  
 TRAVEL-Belgian-Battlefields, 1st Writethru   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-09-05)
McAuliffe's one-word rebuff - "Nuts!" - ensured Bastogne's place in military legend and the town's continued resistance earned the allied forces time to regroup and repulse Hitler's last offensive.
A massive concrete star, 12 metres tall and almost 80 metres across, stands on the Mardasson hill outside the town as a memorial to the 76,890 Americans killed, injured or reported missing in the Battle of the Bulge.
A Sherman tank dominates the town square, which is named after McAuliffe and surrounded by cafes, including one that serves a locally brewed strong ale called Airborne that's served in a mug shaped like a Second World War U.S. army helmet.
www.cp.org /english/online/full/travel/041130/u113016A.html   (1305 words)

  
 Army Air Forces in World War II
Anthony C. McAuliffe command-ed soldiers surrounded at Bastogne, Belgium, during the Battle of the Bulge.
McAuliffe achieved immortality for his defiant “Nuts!” in response to German demands for his surrender.
Meanwhile, McAuliffe’s battered command included five hundred badly wounded men; gas, ammunition, and rations continued to dwindle as it became questionable whether General Patton’s relief forces could break through in time.
www.usaaf.net /ww2/airlift/airliftpg6b.htm   (729 words)

  
 Worldandnation: Remembering the turning point
He remembers Dec. 16, 1944, when the field phone rang in the command post of the 101st Airborne Division's artillery regiment in eastern France and a voice told him to wake his boss, Brig.
McAuliffe scribbled a reply: "To the German commander.
While WWII historian Barry Turner says McAuliffe's one-word riposte "lost something in translation," others have speculated that "nuts" might be a sanitized version of what the tough paratroop general actually said.
www.sptimes.com /2004/12/12/news_pf/Worldandnation/Remembering_the_turni.shtml   (958 words)

  
 The 101st Airborne Division During WW II - Overview
As the German armored column approached Veghel, McAuliffe ordered an antitank gun brought up, and although there is debate over which unit fired, the American defenders knocked out the lead tank, and the enemy column turned back.
At the same McAuliffe sent two battalions of the 506th north to confront the enemy position on the highway.
General Taylor, however, was on leave in the U.S., and General McAuliffe received temporary command of the division.
www.ww2-airborne.us /18corps/101abn/101_overview.html   (5114 words)

  
 "NUTS!" Revisited
Moore told General McAuliffe that we had a German surrender ultimatum.
But then McAuliffe realized that some sort of reply was in order.
McAuliffe then asked Col. Harper to deliver the message to the Germans.
www.thedropzone.org /europe/Bulge/kinnard.html   (1031 words)

  
 Northwest Indiana News: nwitimes.com
Anthony McAuliffe, and have him report immediately to HQ.
He recalls that as McAuliffe went out the door, he turned and said, "Lieutenant, stay by that phone.
Asserting that Bastogne was "encircled," the note gave McAuliffe, who was acting commander of the 101st in the absence of Maj. Gen.
www.thetimesonline.com /articles/2004/12/12/opinion/forum/c2fc654b5ab7080286256f6500654ed8.prt   (752 words)

  
 High Tide at Bastogne   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-09-05)
Anthony McAuliffe, the 101st Airborne Division's acting commander, as soon as he heard the division was being rushed to Belgium to help repel a major enemy breakthrough.
Anthony McAuliffe, the 101st's artillery commander, in acting command of the division when word reached Mourmelon that the Germans had launched a major offensive in Belgium.
Gerald Higgins, was in England along with five senior divisional commanders and 16 junior officers to discuss the recently concluded operation in the Netherlands.
www.thehistorynet.com /wwii/blhightide   (951 words)

  
 American Experience | Battle of the Bulge | Special Features
On the 22nd of December, when the division was and had been totally surrounded by the Germans, the intelligence officer and I decided that we had to take this to General McAuliffe.
We first took it to the chief of staff, and the three of us, and Colonel Harper then went in, woke up General McAuliffe who was taking a bit of a nap, and told him that we had a surrender ultimatum.
And he said, Tony McAuliffe then said, "I surrender, ah nuts!" And then he sort of pondered about whether he should answer or should it be in writing, and so forth.
www.pbs.org /wgbh/amex/bulge/sfeature/sf_footage_04.html   (270 words)

  
 Space Today Online - Barbara Morgan Teacher Astronaut
Back in 1986, she and New Hampshire school teacher Christa McAuliffe were part of NASA's Teacher in Space program.
McAuliffe was on her way to space on January 28, 1986, aboard the shuttle Challenger when it exploded killing her and six NASA crewmates.
McAuliffe was the first to fly in the Teacher in Space program.
www.spacetoday.org /Astronauts/BarbaraMorganTeacherAstronaut.html   (620 words)

  
 Weekender page   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-09-05)
For 60 years, this rural town in southeast Belgium has been tied to the US by bonds forged in the fire and fury of the Battle of the Bulge when the locals and their American defenders stood in the path of a German onslaught during the bitter winter of 1944.
Surrounded, outnumbered and under intense bombardment, the commander of the US 101st Airborne in Bastogne, General Anthony McAuliffe received a message from his German counterpart on Dec 22, 1944, offering him the chance to surrender.
A massive concrete star, 12m high and 80m across stands on the Mardasson hill outside the town as a memorial to the 76,890 Americans killed, injured or reported missing in the Battle of the Bulge.
www.thenational.com.pg /1203/w6.htm   (697 words)

  
 Resident
Surrounded, outnumbered and under intense bombardment, the commander of the U.S. 101st Airborne in Bastogne, Gen. Anthony McAuliffe, received a message from his German counterpart on Dec. 22, 1944, offering him the chance to surrender.
A Sherman tank dominates the town square, which is named after McAuliffe and is surrounded by cafÈs.
One of the cafÈs serves a locally brewed strong ale called "Airborne" that is served in a mug shaped like a World War II U.S. Army helmet.
www.resident.com /new_tr_bastogne.html   (1066 words)

  
 RTE News - Dublin man charged with murder of father
71-year-old John McAuliffe, known locally as Tony, was discovered dead on the ground outside his flat in Artane yesterday morning.
Anthony McAuliffe was arrested yesterday and detained overnight at Raheny Garda Station.
He has been remanded in custody and is due to appear again at Cloverhill District Court on Thursday 1 November.
www.rte.ie /news/2001/1030/mcauliffe.html   (133 words)

  
 [No title]   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-09-05)
State Representative Craig Dally, State Representative Richard Grucela, and PENNDOT Acting Northampton County Maintenance Manager Bill Bellas were joined by Kenneth McAuliffe, Jr., Vincent Vicari, Ret., U.S. Army, former Aide to Gen. McAuliffe and members of the 101st Airborne Association, General Anthony C. McAuliffe Chapter in unveiling the new highway signs.
The late General McAuliffe?s Aide Vincent Vicari said, ?This is an honor that we deeply appreciate, one that the General never would have expected.
PENNDOT Acting Northampton County Maintenance Manager Bill Bellas said, ?We are pleased to celebrate the dedication of Route 33 as the General Anthony Clement McAuliffe 101st Airborne Memorial Highway.
www.dot.state.pa.us /penndot/districts/district5.nsf/f3ac9260873c498385256d5100603280/f1ff0e3cbdedfe5185256c9b0057ad67   (428 words)

  
 W. Thomas Smith Jr. on Christmas & War on National Review Online
The 101st, under the command of Brigadier General Anthony McAuliffe, was about to make history.
McAuliffe agreed and penned his now-famous response to the Germans.
Despite McAuliffe's words, the situation was bleak, and the paratroopers knew it.
www.nationalreview.com /smitht/smith200412230825.asp   (1407 words)

  
 UltrAgt :: Ultragt.tk
When the 101st received its orders, their commander, MG Taylor was in Washington at the War Department and the Division Artillery Commander, Brigadier General Anthony McAuliffe was named acting commander.
It was up to McAuliffe to lead the division in trucks and trailers 107 miles to Bastogne.
When the division arrived, the Germans were already on the outskirts of the city and McAuliffe ordered the 501st PIR to launch a diversionary attack east of Bastogne to distract the Germans.
www.freewebs.com /ultragt/the101stairborne.htm   (5975 words)

  
 Battle of Bulge vet relives Allies' desperate winter
He says that as McAuliffe went out the door, he turned and said, "Lieutenant, stay by that phone.
Asserting that Bastogne was encircled, the note gave McAuliffe, acting commander of the 101st, two hours to surrender or face "total annihilation." It offered "the privileges of the Geneva Convention" to the would-be POWs.
War historians offer a mixed verdict: the Battle of the Bulge delayed the Allied timetable for victory in Europe by at least six weeks, but because it depleted Hitler's best forces, it made the final push to Berlin less costly.
www.freep.com /news/nw/bulge16e_20041216.htm   (1140 words)

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