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Topic: Antigonus I Monophthalmus


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  Spartanburg SC | GoUpstate.com | Spartanburg Herald-Journal
Antigonus I Monophthalmus ("the One-eyed", so called from his having lost an eye) (382 BC - 301 BC) was a Macedonian nobleman, general, and satrap under Alexander the Great.
Antigonus was appointed governor of Greater Phrygia in 333 BC, and in the division of the provinces after Alexander's death in 323 BC he also received Pamphylia and Lycia from Perdiccas, regent of the empire.
Antigonus fought against Eumenes two great battles at Paraitacene in 317 BC and Gabiene in 316 BC, following which Eumenes was at last delivered up to Antigonus through treachery in Persia and put to death (316 BC).
www.goupstate.com /apps/pbcs.dll/section?category=NEWS&template=wiki&text=Antigonus_I_Monophthalmus   (875 words)

  
 Antigonus I Monophthalmus (one-eye) (382-301)
Antigonus I Monophthalmus (one-eyed) was one of Alexander the Great’s most important generals, and one of the most able of his successors.
Antigonus, aware that this was the precursor to an attack on him, fled to Antipater in Macedonia.
Antigonus himself concentrated on the northern war, against Lysimachus and Cassander, leaving his son Demetrius in command in Syria.
www.historyofwar.org /articles/people_antigonusI.html   (1638 words)

  
  Antigonus I Monophthalmus
Antigonus I Cyclops or Monophthalmus ("the One-eyed", so called from his having lost an eye) (382 BC - 301 BC) was a Macedonian nobleman, general, and satrap under Alexander the Great.
Antigonus was appointed governor of Greater Phrygia in 333 BC, and in the division of the provinces after Alexander's death in 323 BC he also received Pamphylia and Lycia from Perdiccas, regent of the empire.
Antigonus fought against Eumenes two great battles at Paraitacene in 317 BC and Gabiene in 316 BC, following which Eumenes was at last delivered up to Antigonus through treachery in Persia and put to death (316 BC).
www.reboom.com /article/Antigonus_I_Monophthalmus.html   (877 words)

  
 Antigonus I Monophthalmus (382-301 B.C.)
Antigonus was now in complete control of Asia Minor, but Ptolemy, Lysimachus, Cassander, and Seleucus allied themselves against him in the first coalition war (315-311) in an attempt to thwart his plan of reuniting Alexander's empire.
Antigonus, no longer regent but merely strategos (officer in charge) of the whole of Asia, was to rule in Syria and from the Hellespont to the Euphrates.
Docimus, the regent of Phrygia, and Phoenix, the strategos of Lycia, deserted Antigonus.
www.thelatinlibrary.com /imperialism/notes/antigonus.html   (1078 words)

  
 Antigonus
Antigonus' peaceful years as the Satrap of Phrygia came to a conclusion upon Alexander's death, for the next two decades this obscure administrative ruler of Phrygia would dominate the political arena during the period of the Diadochoi.
Antigonus was a family man, he married his wife and remained married to her for the rest of his life, in sharp contrast to the other successors.13 There was also genuine affection between Antigonus and his son Demetrios.
Antigonus was among Alexander's successors, in the strongest position to reunite the lands conquered by Alexander.
members.tripod.com /~Kekrops/Hellenistic_Files/Antigonus.html   (2950 words)

  
 Antigonus III: Free Encyclopedia Articles at Questia.com Online Library
Antigonus the One-Eyed and his son...Macedon, now ruled by Antigonus III Doson regent for the...
Antigonus arrived in Babylon...seventh year of Philip III, a royal army was...authority of Philip III in 318, (26) was...fleeing east with Antigonus and his forces in...
Wars with Rome Under Antigonus IIIs successor, Philip V (reigned 221 179 b.c.), Macedon...
www.questia.com /library/encyclopedia/101229437   (937 words)

  
 The split of Alexander's empire at Kaboodle
Antigonus I Monophthalmus and his son Demetrius I of Macedon were pitted against the coalition of...
Antigonus I Monophthalmus and his son Demetrius I of Macedon were pitted against the coalition of three other companions of Alexander: Cassander, ruler of Macedon; Lysimachus, ruler of Thrace; and Seleucus I Nicator, ruler of Babylonia and Persia.
Antigonus' son, Demetrius Poliorcretes (later Demetrius I of Macedon), was an able agent in the bid to build the empire by invading Greece; Antigonus defeated (306) Ptolemy, but both Antigonus and Ptolemy were conquered at the battle at Ipsus (301).
www.kaboodle.com /wrj/The-split-of-Alexanders-empire.html   (1118 words)

  
 Antigonus I Monophthalmus - Definition, explanation
Antigonus I Monophthalmos ("the One-eyed") (382 BC - 301 BC) was a Macedonian nobleman, general, and satrap under Alexander the Great.
Antigonus had set himself up as lord of all Asia, and, in conjunction with Cassander and Ptolemy, refused to recognize Polyperchon.
Antigonus fought against Eumenes two great battles at Paraitacene in 317 BC and Gabiene in 316 BC, following which Eumenes was executed at Antigonus' order.
www.calsky.com /lexikon/en/txt/a/an/antigonus_i_monophthalmus.php   (654 words)

  
 Antigonus I Monophthalmus Summary
Antigonus was born in Macedon, the son of the minor noble Philip.
Antigonus I Cyclops or Monophthalmus ("the One-eyed", so called from his having lost an eye) (382 BC - 301 BC) was a Macedonian nobleman, general, and satrap under Alexander the Great.
Antigonus was appointed governor of Greater Phrygia in 333 BC, and in the division of the provinces after Alexander's death in 323 BC he also received Pamphylia and Lycia from Perdiccas, regent of the empire.
www.bookrags.com /Antigonus_I_Monophthalmus   (1720 words)

  
 Antigonus II Gonatas
After coming closer than anyone to reuniting the empire of Alexander, Antigonus Monophthalmus was defeated and killed in the great battle of Ipsus in 301 BC and the territory he formerly controlled was divided among his enemies, Cassander, Ptolemy, Lysimachus, and Seleucus.
Because Antigonus Gonatas was the grandson of Antipater and the nephew of Cassander, through his mother, his presence helped to reconcile the supporters of these former kings to the rule of his father.
Antigonus cooperated in the defence of Greece against the barbarians, but it was the Aetolians who took the lead in defeating the Gauls.
www.mlahanas.de /Greeks/Bios/AntigonusIIGonatas.html   (4234 words)

  
 Antigonus_Summary
Antigonus Monophthalmus was a fierce general with his cyloptic face, who was born 382 B.C. Antigonus had served under both Phillip II and Alexander in their respective campaigns of conquest.
Antigonus continued warfare until he lost at the battle of Ipsus to a coalition of a slightly weaker infantry and a superiority of elephants.
Antigonus' character was also worthy of praise, for he was a dutiful family man with a life long successful and a successful relationship with his son.
members.tripod.com /~Kekrops/Summary/Antigonus_Summary.html   (348 words)

  
 Highbeam Encyclopedia - Search Results for Antigonus
(301) Battle marking the defeat at Ipsus, Phrygia, of Antigonus I Monophthalmus and his son Demetrius I Poliorcetes at the hands of Lysimachus of Thrace, Seleucus I Nicator of Babylon, Ptolemy I Soter of Egypt, and Cassander of Macedonia.
Antigonus was killed and his Asian territory lost, but...
Antigonus I, who had summoned his son Demetrius to his aid, was defeated and slain there by his rivals Seleucus and Lysimachus in 301 BC The battle of Ipsus resulted in the dissolution of Alexander's empire.
www.encyclopedia.com /SearchResults.aspx?Q=Antigonus&StartAt=11   (736 words)

  
 History1
The former Persian satrapies in the west were re-organized and redivided: Antigonus (Monophthalmus) received Phrygia, Pamphylia, and Lycia; Lysimachus received Thrace; Euemenes became satrap of Paphlogonia and Cappadocia; Ptolemy Lagid (son of Lagus) (also known as Ptolemy I Soter), formerly Alexander's bodyguard, received the satrapy of Egypt.
While in Coele-Syria, Antigonus (Monophthalmus) was met by envoys from Ptolemy, Lysimachus and Cassander, who insisted that Antigonus cede Cappadocia and Lycia to Cassander, Hellespontine Phrygia to Lysimachus, all of Syria to Ptolemy and Babylonia to Seleucus or else risk a war with these allied satraps (Diod.
During this conflict between Ptolemy and Antigonus (Monophthalmus) nothing is known of Jewish attitudes towards the two claimants on their territory or of any military alliance with either one.
www.abu.nb.ca /Courses/NTIntro/InTest/Hist1.htm   (7875 words)

  
 Highbeam Encyclopedia - Search Results for antigonus
(Antigonus Gonatas), c.320-239 BC, king of Macedon, son of Demetrius I. He took the title king on his father's death (283) but made good his claim only by defeating the Gauls in Thrace and by taking Macedon in 276.
The son of Antigonus I, he proved himself a very able commander in his father's wars, particularly against Ptolemy I. Though Ptolemy defeated him at Gaza in 312 BC, Demetrius was able to expel Cassander from Athens; he then defeated Ptolemy...
Antigonus I was proclaimed king in 306 after his son Demetrius conquered Cyprus, thus giving his father control of the Aegean, the eastern Mediterranean, and most of the Middle East.
www.encyclopedia.com /SearchResults.aspx?Q=antigonus&StartAt=1   (707 words)

  
 222 Glossary
Antigonus and Antipater pressured her to take a back seat, and when Antipater returned to Macedon with the kings after the Triparadeisos agreement, Adea / Eurydike was taken too.
Antigonus Gonatas: the son of Demetrius Poliorcetes and grandson of Antigonus Monophthalmus, who remained active, though marginal, in Macedon after his father's imprisonment by Seleucus (288-7).
Antigonus Monophthalmus (the One-Eyed): born in 382, Antigonus was a close contemporary of Philip II.
www.anchist.mq.edu.au /222/222Glossary.htm   (2689 words)

  
 Antigonus 1 Monophthalmus
Antigonus' own attempt to reunite Alexander's fragmented empire however, provoked a series of wars with a new coalition of former allies (Ptolemy, Lysimachus, and Antipater's son Cassander) and enemies (Perdiccas' successor, Seleucus).
But when Seleucus returned to Babylon, Antigonus negotiated a treaty with other opponents that recognized Greece's independence and his control of all Syria in return for his renunciation of any claim to the regency.
Antigonus countered indirectly by ousting the Macedonian governor of Athens appointed by Cassander (Ptolemy's ally) and restoring the old Athenian democratic constitution (307
virtualreligion.net /iho/antigonus_1.html   (529 words)

  
 Sketches in the History of Western Philosophy
However, Antigonus captured the opposing camp, and Eumenes was surrendered to Antigonus, and to his death, by his own army in exchange for their possessions.
The magnitude of the threat posed by Antigonus led all the others to combine against him, and he was defeated and killed at the battle of Ipsus in 301.
Antigonus is briefly ejected by Pyrrhus again (273-272), but then returns to establish his dynasty for the rest of the independent history of Macedonia.
www.friesian.com /hist-1.htm   (14938 words)

  
 Battle of Ipsus at AllExperts
Antigonus I Monophthalmus and his son Demetrius I of Macedon were pitted against the coalition of three other companions of Alexander: Cassander, ruler of Macedon; Lysimachus, ruler of Thrace; and Seleucus I Nicator, ruler of Babylonia and Persia.
Antigonus was 80 years old and the ruler of modern day Syria, Turkey, Lebanon, and Judea.
Meanwhile in the centre Antigonus' more numerous and experienced troops appeared to be carrying the day, however a detachment of horse archers and skirmishers transferred from the allied right flank to attack Antigonus' unguarded right flank.
en.allexperts.com /e/b/ba/battle_of_ipsus.htm   (540 words)

  
 Ptolemy I Soter - Phantis
When Antigonus One-Eye, master of Asia in 315, showed dangerous ambitions, Ptolemy joined the coalition against him, and on the outbreak of war, evacuated Syria.
In 312, Ptolemy and Seleucus, the fugitive satrap of Babylonia, both invaded Syria, and defeated Demetrius Poliorcetes ("sieger of cities"), the son of Antigonus, in the Battle of Gaza.
When the coalition against Antigonus was renewed in 302, Ptolemy joined it, and invaded Syria a third time, while Antigonus was engaged with Lysimachus in Asia Minor.
wiki.phantis.com /index.php?title=Ptolemy_I_Soter&printable=yes   (1262 words)

  
 Antigonus Monophthalmus - WCD (Wiki Classical Dictionary)
Antigonus was the first of the Diadochi to take the crown, together with his son Demetrius, in 306.
chapter Antigonus (http://hometown.aol.co.uk/bobbbennett/riseof.htm) in the on-line book Successors of Alexander the Great by M.D. Roberts and R.S. Bennett.
This page was last modified 17:01, 21 Apr 2006.
www.ancientlibrary.com /wcd/Antigonus_Monophthalmus   (223 words)

  
 Antigonus - Research the news about Antigonus - from HighBeam Research   (Site not responding. Last check: )
Chalcis in Euboia, Corinth, and Demetrias—guaranteed Antigonus' influence, and although an alliance led by Athens and...
The first bearer of the name Antigonus of whom we know was one of the generals of Alexander...
Seleucus I, and Lysimachus, fearing the power of Antigonus, allied themselves against him, Antigonus and Demetrius were badly defeated in the...
www.highbeam.com /library/search.asp?refid=LEXICOM&q=Antigonus   (864 words)

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