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Topic: Antiochus I Soter


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  Antiochus I Soter   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-11-05)
Antiochus I Soter (324/323-26/261 BC reigned 281 BC - 261 BC) was half Persian, his mother Apame being one of those eastern princesses whom Alexander had given as wives to his generals in 324 BC.
In 278 BC the Gauls broke into Asia Minor, and a victory which Antiochus won over these hordes is said to have been the origin of his title of Soter (Gr for "saviour").
About 262 BC Antiochus tried to break the growing power of Pergamum by force of arms, but suffered defeat near Sardis and died soon afterwards (262 BC).
www.theezine.net /a/antiochus-i-soter.html   (297 words)

  
 Antiochus Epiphanes IV
Antiochus Ephiphanes IV was a king in the Seleucid Dynasty so let's begin with the history of the Seleucid kingdom and the relationship of Palestine to this kingdom.
Antiochus IV Epiphanes, was a hostage in Rome and was on the way home when news of his brother's death reached him and he hurried home and ousted the usurper Heliodorus, and took the throne.
Antiochus Epiphanse, saw all this as rebellion against his rule and descended on Jerusalem, looting the temple and re-establishing Menelaus in office.
dedication.www3.50megs.com /dan/epiphanes.html   (1939 words)

  
 Antiochus - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
Antiochus is the name of thirteen kings of the Seleucid dynasty:
Antiochus IV Epiphanes, the oppressor of the Jews who provoked the revolt of the Maccabees.
Antiochus is also the name of four rulers of the small middle-eastern kingdom of Kommagene:
en.wikipedia.org /wiki/Antiochus   (117 words)

  
 antiochus
Antiochus was the name of several Syrian kings between 280 BC to 65 BC.
He was succeeded (187) by his son, Seleucus IV Philopator, spoken of by Daniel (11:20) as "a raiser of taxes", in the Revised Version, "one that shall cause an exactor to pass through the glory of the kingdom."
Enraged at this, Antiochus marched against them in person, threatening utterly to exterminate the nation; but on the way he was suddenly arrested by the hand of death (164 BC).
www.fact-library.com /antiochus.html   (210 words)

  
 Chronicle concerning Antiochus, Bactria, and India (BCHP 7)
The Babylonian Chronicle concerning Antiochus, Bactria, and India ("Antiochus and India chronicle"; BCHP 7* or ABC 13A) is one of the historiographical texts from ancient Babylonia.
It is important because it mentions a Seleucid crown prince, probably the future king Antiochus I Soter, ordering repairs in Babylon and preparing for war.
Antiochus, the son of Seleucus, took part in the battle of Ipsus in 301.
www.livius.org /cg-cm/chronicles/bchp-india/antiochus_india_02.html   (944 words)

  
 Antiochus I Soter biography   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-11-05)
But Appian is wrong in maintaining that he was given the surname Soter on this occasion.
At the instigation of Magas of Cyrene, Antiochus declared war against Ptolemy II Philadelphus.
Antiochus fell upon the battle-field, slain, it is said, by a Gaul, though this statement may be due to a confusion with the end of Antiochus Hierax (q.v.).
www.dromo.info /antiochusIbio.htm   (358 words)

  
 CATHOLIC ENCYCLOPEDIA: Seleucids
Under Soter's son, ANTIOCHUS II THEOS (261-46), began the wars with the Ptolemies for the possession of Phoenicia and Palestine.
The marriage of Antiochus II to Berenice, daughter of Ptolemy II Philadelphus, brought about a temporary cessation of the struggle; but on Ptolemy's death, Laodice, the first and disowned wife of Antiochus, was recalled and avenged herself by having Antiochus, Berenice, and their child put to death.
His two brothers ANTIOCHUS XI and Philip continued the war, but were defeated, and during the flight Antiochus XI met death in the waves of the Orontes.
www.newadvent.org /cathen/13690a.htm   (1368 words)

  
 Articles - Antiochus II Theos   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-11-05)
Antiochus II Theos (286–246 BC; reigned 261–246 BC) succeeded his father Antiochus I Soter as head of the Seleucid dynasty on 261 BC.
He was the son of Antiochus I and princess Stratonice, the daughter of Demetrius Poliorcetes
Antiochus repudiated his wife Laodice and married Ptolemy's daughter Berenice to seal their treaty, but by 246 BC Antiochus had left Berenice and her infant son in Antioch to live again with Laodice in Asia Minor.
www.nowize.com /articles/Antiochus_II_Theos   (237 words)

  
 Antiochus II Theos   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-11-05)
Antiochus II Theos (286-246 BC reigned 261 - 246 BC), whose mother was the Macedonian princess Stratonice, daughter of Demetrius Poliorcetes succeeded his father Antiochus I Soter as head of the Seleucid dynasty on 261 BC.
He inherited a state of war with Egypt, which went on along the coasts of Asia Minor (the "Second Syrian War").
About 250 BC peace was concluded between Antiochus and II of Egypt">Ptolemy II, Antiochus repudiating his wife Laodice and marrying Ptolemy's daughter Berenice, but by 246 BC Antiochus had left Berenice and her infant son in Antioch to live again with Laodice in Asia Minor.
www.factbase.info /an/antiochus-ii-theos.html   (153 words)

  
 Seleucia, Antiochos I - Ancient Greek Coinage - WildWinds.com
Antiochus I Soter to Antiochus II Theos AR Tetradrachm.
Seleukid Kingdom, Antiochos I Soter, as Co-regent with Seleukos I, 294-281 BC, AR Tetradrachm.
Seleukid Kingdom, Antiochos I Soter, Sole Reign, AR Tetradrachm.
www.wildwinds.com /coins/greece/seleucia/antiochos_I/i.html   (796 words)

  
 Antiochus I Soter --  Britannica Concise Encyclopedia - The online encyclopedia you can trust!   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-11-05)
Antiochus was the son of Seleucus I, founder of the Seleucid kingdom, and his Sogdian queen, Apama.
After his father's assassination in 281, Antiochus succeeded to the entire realm, but he was immediately beset by revolts in Syria (probably instigated by Egypt), by independence movements in northern Anatolia, and by a war led by Antigonus II Gonatas, ruler of the Greek cities and Macedonia.
Between 266 and 261 Antiochus was drawn into a war with Pergamum, and in 262 he suffered a defeat and lost additional territory.
www.britannica.com /ebc/article-9007860   (1160 words)

  
 Antiochus I   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-11-05)
Antiochus I was given control over several provinces in the Syrian empire, apparently in the west.
The nickname Soter (savior) was given him after his victory over the Gauls which threatened Anatolia, called by historians the 'victory of the elephants.' Antiochus I was of Greek heritage, and was himself one of the greatest builders of Greek-style cities.
Antiochus at middle age, w/ diadem; rev: nude Apollo seated on omphalos holding bow.
www.ancientroute.com /people/Antioc01.htm   (207 words)

  
 Antiochus I
Silver coin of Antiochus I. The reverse shows Apollo seated on an omphalos.
Erasistratos examines the pulse of Antiochus I Soter, on the right side Stratonice of Syria
Succeeded by: Antiochus II This article incorporates text from the public domain 1911 Encyclopædia Britannica.
www.mlahanas.de /Greeks/Bios/AntiochusISoter.html   (362 words)

  
 Allusions
(Antiochus the Preserver) Syrian Seleucid ruler; king of Syria 280b-261b; killed; son of Seleucus I Nicator _324b-261b (b.
(Antiochus the Divine) king of Syria 261b-247b; son of Antiochus I. king of the Seleucid dominions in the Middle East, who succeeded his father, Antiochus I, in 261 BC and spent much of his reign at war with Egypt, recovering much territory in Anatolia.
He reformed the empire administratively by reducing the provinces in size, established a ruler cult (with himself and his consort Laodice as divine), and improved relations with neighbouring countries by giving his daughters in marriage to their princes.
www.pthompson.addr.com /prince/allusions.htm   (5069 words)

  
 Seleucid Empire, page 1 (Seleucus I - Timarchos)
The kindom was a major center of Hellenistic culture which maintained the pre-eminence of Greek customs and manners over the Middle East.
It began to decline in 190 BC after a first defeat by the Romans and lasted until 64 BC when the last Seleucid king, Antiochus XIII, was murdered by Sampsiceramus, an Arab emir, at the behest of Pompey the Great.
Son of Antiochus I. Coregent 266 - 261 BC; Sole Reign 261 - 246 BC.
www.grifterrec.com /coins/seleucia/seleucid.html   (456 words)

  
 Second Temple Times
Antiochus actually erected a pagan altar in the temple at Jerusalem and offered upon it a sow in sacrifice, an unclean animal.
In his arrogance he entered the temple and carried off the golden altar, the lamp-stand with all its equipment, the table for the Bread of the Presence, the sacred cups and bowls, the golden censers, the curtain and the crowns.
Antiochus died the next year bringing great rejoicing in Israel (and in Syria).
www.templemount.org /secondtmp.html   (8569 words)

  
 AllRefer.com - Antiochus I (Ancient History, Middle East, Biography) - Encyclopedia
Antiochus I (Antiochus Soter)[AntI´ukus sO´tur] Pronunciation Key, b.
He did not, like his father, seek to expand in Europe.
Antiochus was famous as a founder of cities.
reference.allrefer.com /encyclopedia/A/Antiochu1.html   (156 words)

  
 wikien.info: Main_Page   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-11-05)
Encyclopedia : A : AN : ANT : Antiochus I Soter
On the assassination of his father Seleucus I in 281 BC, the task of holding together the empire was a formidable one, and a revolt in Syria broke out almost immediately.
In 278 BC the Gauls broke into Asia Minor, and a victory which Antiochus won over these hordes is said to have been the origin of his title of Soter (Gr.
www.aksagrafik.info /index.php?title=Antiochus_I_Soter   (318 words)

  
 Antiochus IV - Encyclopedia Glossary Meaning Explanation Antiochus IV   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-11-05)
Antiochus IV - Encyclopedia Glossary Meaning Explanation Antiochus IV Antiochus IV - Encyclopedia Glossary Meaning Explanation Antiochus IV.
Here you will find more informations about Antiochus IV.
*Antiochus IV Epiphanes, the Seleucid ruler of Judea who was displaced by the revolt of the Maccabees.
www.encyclopedia-glossary.com /en/Antiochus-IV.html   (115 words)

  
 Additional Reading (from Antiochus I Soter) --  Encyclopædia Britannica
The primary source in English of knowledge about the members of the Seleucid dynasty is Edwin Robert Bevan, The House of Seleucus, 2 vol.
More results on "Additional Reading (from Antiochus I Soter)" when you join.
More from Britannica on "Additional Reading (from Antiochus I Soter)"...
www.britannica.com /eb/article-354?tocId=354   (855 words)

  
 Antiochus I Soter --  Britannica Concise Encyclopedia - Your gateway to all Britannica has to offer!
Antiochus I Soter --  Britannica Concise Encyclopedia - Your gateway to all Britannica has to offer!
The Gauls in Asia Minor were not defeated until 275, after which he was hailed as Soter (“Saviour”) by appreciative Ionians.
More results on "Antiochus I Soter" when you join.
concise.britannica.com /ebc/article-9355513   (716 words)

  
 Berossus   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-11-05)
Berossus published the Babyloniaca (hereafter, History of Babylonia) some time around 290-278 B.C.E. for the Macedonian/Seleucid king, Antiochus I.
Certain astrological fragments recorded in Pliny the Elder, Censorinus, Flavius Josephus, and Marcus Vitruvius Pollio are also attributed to him, but are of unknown provenance, or indeed where they might fit into his History.
It is suggested that it was commissioned by Antiochus I, perhaps desiring a history of one of his newly-acquired lands, or by the Great Temple priests, seeking justification for the worship of Marduk in Seleucid lands.
www.tocatch.info /en/Berosus.htm   (2162 words)

  
 Pentacles, Pythagoras and Time   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-11-05)
The influence of Slip of the Tongue appears in a significantly distorted manner in Agrippa's De occulta philosophia, where a pentagram is pictured inscribed on a signet of the Syrian king, Antiochus Soter, together with the word ygieia.
As one of the great Renaissance students of magick, Agrippa was certainly familiar with the Solomonic tradition, so it is safe to assume that the Inquisition's continuing prosecution of that tradition was what prevented him from identifying the pentagram as Solomon's seal.
In this light, it seems Agrippa assigned the pentagram to so harmless and little-known an ancient as Antiochus Soter as a premeditated strategy for allowing an important symbol to be published safely.
www.widdershins.org /vol1iss8/o9614.htm   (4191 words)

  
 Bible Picture Library of LineArt
Coin of Antiochus I Soter 280-261 BC Note: Different browsers all have slightly different capabilities and terminology.
Coin of Antiochus V Eupator 164-162 BC Note: Different browsers all have slightly different capabilities and terminology.
Coin of Antiochus VI Tryphon 142-139 BC Note: Different browsers all have slightly different capabilities and terminology.
www.cc-art.com /sampler/Lineart/html/rulerss1.HTM   (903 words)

  
 Antiochus Epiphanes - Cutting Edge Ministries
Often times in the Book of Daniel we are instructed concerning the King of the North and the King of the South.
In chapter eleven of Daniel, there are references to Ptolemy I Soter, Ptolemy II Philiadelphus, Ptolemy III Euergetes, Ptolemy IV Epiphanes, Ptolemy V Epiphanes, Ptolemy VI Eupator, Ptolemy VII Philometer, and even Cleopatra VI.
References to the kings of the north include: Seleucus I Nicator, Antiochus I Soter, Antiochus II Theos, Seleucus II Callinicos, Seleucus III Ceraunos, Antiochus III the Great, Seleucus IV Philopater, Antiochus IV Epiphanes, and Antiochus V Eupator.
www.revelationofjohn.com /Revel28.html   (483 words)

  
 FORVM's Classical Numismatics Discussion Board Gallery
Antiochus I * Apollo,* 280-261 BC Æ hemidrachm (?)
Sear, GCATV * (SG) Number 6866v (This example appears to be bronze, not silver: I have been unable to date to find any reference to an Æ variant of SG #6866).
This coin bears portrait of the middle-aged Antiochus I 'Soter,' from the time of his sole reign (280-261 BC.), following the death of his father, Seleukos I. The reverse depicts Delphian Apollo holding a single arrow, as opposed to the two arrows as seen on the coins dating from his joint-reign with his father.
www.forumancientcoins.com /gallery/displayimage.php?album=282&pos=4   (166 words)

  
 ~*Antiochus II 'Theos' "King" of Syria/~*Laodice I of Syria   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-11-05)
~*Antiochus II 'Theos' "King" of Syria/~*Laodice I of Syria
Born: at: abt 287 BC 88-164,137 Married: at: Died: at: aug 246 BC Father:~*Antiochus I 'Soter' "King" of Syria Mother:~*Stratonice of Macedonia Other Spouses:
Name: Antiochus "Hierax" of Syria Born: at: Married: at: Died: at: Spouses:
mariah.stonemarche.org /famfiles/fam09743.htm   (120 words)

  
 CHRISTIAN MEDIA RESEARCH -- CM CURRENTS 61
Cassander and Lysimachus faded into historic oblivion as the two stronger leaders, the Syrian Seleucus Nicator in the North and the Egyptian Ptolemy I in the South, wrestled for supremacy.
He was the infamous tyrant known for slaughtering a pig on the Jerusalem altar.
Antiochus Epiphanes, the ancient opponent of Israel, was the eighth (and final) independent ruler of that dynasty.
www.christianmediaresearch.com /cmc-61.html   (3218 words)

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