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Topic: Antisthenes


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In the News (Sun 18 Aug 19)

  
  Henry Lion Oldie. The prophet
Antisthenes grasped the poker and, his eyes closed, swung and struck the entanglement of coil pipes, filters, boiling retorts, and copper wires.
Antisthenes darted for the window when his look fell on the test- tube he was still squeezing in his hand.
Antisthenes was considered to be a crank, a man slightly touched in the head, a kind of God's fool doing no harm to anyone.
www.lib.ru /OLDI/prophet_engl.txt   (990 words)

  
 Antisthenes - Encyclopedia.com
Antisthenes, like Xenophanes, repudiated polytheism, substituting one god, whom he described as unlike anything known to man. His view that each individual is unique had implications for ethics and for a theory of knowledge.
Cynics, it is true, have changed since Antisthenes and his followers barked at the folly and injustices of ancient Greece.
Antisthenes, who was with the great man when he drank his hemlock, believed that the only things that mattered in life were virtuous...
www.encyclopedia.com /doc/1E1-Antisthe.html   (811 words)

  
 20th WCP: Antisthenes' Concept of Paideia
Antisthenes of Athens (445-360 B.C.) is remembered for being one of Socrates' older pupils.
Antisthenes' understanding of reasoning and virtue is that they cannot be confiscated or lost (iv.
This was not a change that Antisthenes would necessarily have approved, nor needed since his philosophy did not demand that he return to a state of nature.
www.bu.edu /wcp/Papers/Anci/AnciLuz.htm   (2270 words)

  
 Antisthenes
Regarding his religious views, Antisthenes maintained that, in the universe, everything is regulated by a divine intelligence, from design, so to benefit the good person who is the friend of God.
Antisthenes appears to have been carried to excess in his virtuous zeal against the luxury, although the accounts which have come down to us respecting him may be exaggerated.
Antisthenes wrote many books, however, unlike Plato, his works have been lost and he is a largely forgotten figure in the history of philosophy.
www.philosophyprofessor.com /philosophers/antisthenes.php   (650 words)

  
 Antisthenes Summary
Antisthenes was important as the founder of a sect which offered a simpler and more natural way of life at a time when the values of the city-state were in serious decline and men had to seek for spiritual guidance elsewhere.
Antisthenes, son of an Athenian father and Thracian mother, was a pupil of the rhetorician Gorgias and an intimate and admirer of Socrates.
Antisthenes combined a moral interest in politics with a wariness of the dangers of participation, and attacked the rules of convention when they were in opposition to the laws of virtue.
www.bookrags.com /Antisthenes   (1340 words)

  
 The Ecole Glossary   (Site not responding. Last check: )
Antisthenes of Athens (444-366 BCE) was a student of Gorgias and a follower of Socrates, who significantly influenced his theories.
Very little remains of what Antisthenes wrote, but through the works of his followers we understand that he abandoned his wealth and all material enjoyment to pursue true happiness, which was defined by and existed only in moral virtue.
Antisthenes believed that words were direct links to reality, that all propositions were either true or meaningless, and that it was impossible for there to be contradicting statements.
www2.evansville.edu /ecoleweb/glossary/antisthenes.html   (170 words)

  
 [No title]
His father, Icesias, a banker, was convicted of debasing the public coin, and was obliged to leave the country; or, according to another account, his father and himself were charged with this offense, and the former was thrown into prison, while the son escaped and went to Athens.
Antisthenes at first refused to admit him into his house and even struck him with a stick.
Diogenes calmly bore the rebuke and said, "Strike me, Antisthenes, but you will never find a stick sufficiently hard to remove me from your presence, while you speak anything worth hearing." The philosopher was so much pleased with this reply that he at once admitted him among his scholars.
www.lycos.com /info/cynics--diogenes-laertius.html   (408 words)

  
 DIOGENES OF SINOPE
Antisthenes, an intimate and admirer of Socrates, disclaimed refined philosophy believing that the plain man could know all there is to know.
Antisthenes was probably more consciously philosophical though less clever than his pupil Diogenes.
Antisthenes emphasized moral self-mastery and is said to have rejected government, property, marriage and religion.
www.benbest.com /philo/diogenes.html   (1052 words)

  
 Antisthenes [Internet Encyclopedia of Philosophy]
Antisthenes’ philosophical interests engage ethics rather than metaphysics or epistemology, and he advocates the practice of virtue through an ascetic life and the cultivation of wisdom.
These sources are not, however, without problems: Xenophon is portraying Antisthenes as an interlocutor, which leads some scholars to question whether this character is in fact representative of the historical Antisthenes; Diogenes Laertius is thought of as a dubious source due to his penchant for recounting contradictory stories from multiple sources.
Antisthenes’ influence is primarily upon the “school” of Cynicism, both as a precursor and originator.
www.utm.edu /research/iep/a/antisthe.htm   (1380 words)

  
 Antisthenes
Antisthenes (c.445-c.365): influential Athenian philosopher, pupil of Socrates, co-founder of the Cynical school.
In the decade after the death of Socrates, Antisthenes was the most important Athenian philosopher.
Antisthenes added that one also had to be strong enough ("as strong as Socrates") to pursue what was good.
www.livius.org /am-ao/antisthenes/antisthenes.html   (154 words)

  
 Antisthenes - LoveToKnow 1911
His work represents one great aspect of Socratic philosophy, and should be compared with the Cyrenaic and Megarian doctrines.
- Charles Chappuis, Antisthene (Paris, 18 54); A. Muller, De Antisthenis cynici vita et scriptis (Dresden, 1860); T. Gomperz, Greek Thinkers (Eng.
For his philosophy see Cynics, and for his pupils, Diogenes and Crates, see articles under these headings.
www.1911encyclopedia.org /Antisthenes   (285 words)

  
 The Absolute Dog   (Site not responding. Last check: )
Antisthenes, some say the most dedicated student of Socrates, became known as "the Dog" or "the Absolute Dog" because of his "absolute commitment to reason infused by a creative energy" (E. Bignone cited in Navia) for setting the world aright.
Antisthenes of Athens: Setting the World Aright costs quite a bit of money, but is a valuable introduction to the life and legacy of the first self-proclaimed Dog.
This "ancient discussion" convinced me that the legitimate heirs of Socrates were Antisthenes and Diogenes, and certainly not Plato and Aristotle who laid the theoretical foundations for class society, empires, church and state hierarchies and the neo-conservative, fascistic ideology of the present day.
www.greenanarchy.org /index.php?action=viewwritingdetail&writingId=191   (1549 words)

  
 Bryn Mawr Classical Review 2001.06.23
When Antisthenes' name does appear, what is said is usually of little interest, either too evasive on a given thorny issue, or too dependent on outdated scholarly traditions ultimately rooted in Diogenes Laertius or prejudices about "cynic" attitudes (serious Cynic ideas having been out of the question until recently).
And indeed for Antisthenes, as distinct from Diogenes of Sinope, we have contemporary testimony in Xenophon, Aristotle and, enigmatically, Plato, all in their own ways reliable authors who probably knew Antisthenes personally and at least wrote accounts intended to be credible to those who did.
According to N., Antisthenes' rejection of language, a biographical event, was "the prelude to his Cynic conversion," which finally occurred at Socrates' unjust death and was characterized by the cessation of all but the barest verbal activity.
ccat.sas.upenn.edu /bmcr/2001/2001-06-23.html   (3059 words)

  
 ANCIENT PHILOSOPHY: The Metaphysical Period - Page 1
Antisthenes taught that knowledge (cognition) could not pass beyond the data of the senses.
Son of a lower-class Athenian father and either a Thracian or Phrygian-slave mother, Antisthenes (picture) was the founder of the Cynic school of Greek philosophy.
Antisthenes was opposed to Plato's doctrine of ideas and to Aristippus' philosophy of pleasure.
radicalacademy.com /adiphilmetaphysical.htm   (3221 words)

  
 History of Philosophy 8
Antisthenes, the first of the Cynics, was born at Athens about the year 436 B.C. Early in life he associated himself with the Sophists, becoming, according to Diogenes Laertius,
Indeed, it is said that Antisthenes, who happened to resemble Socrates in personal appearance, imagined that he heightened the resemblance by perverting the Socratic doctrine of moderation and abstemiousness into something bordering on a savage indifference to everything decent.
Antisthenes was by temperament narrow-minded and obstinate, impervious to culture, a man of strong will but of mediocre intellectual ability.
www.nd.edu /Departments/Maritain/etext/hop08.htm   (2406 words)

  
 Cynicism   (Site not responding. Last check: )
Antisthenes demonstrated how our desires lead ultimately to misery; therefore, a virtuous man always neglected pleasure and pleasure seeking activities because the ultimate result of these endeavors was misery.
Antisthenes and his followers seem to have taken these ideas and carried them to their extremes: totally neglecting all of the conventions of society (i.e.
Although Antisthenes was the founder of the cynical school of philosophy, he did not seem to practice what he preached as effectively as some of his followers.
personal.ecu.edu /mccartyr/ancient/athens/Cynicism.htm   (688 words)

  
 eurlect_2
Antisthenes held that happiness lies in the special virtue, called autarchy (autarcia), namely being the master and the controller of oneself, whereby one ought to pursue absolute autonomy and freedom based on reason.
From here for practical matters, Antisthenes advocated the "return to the state of nature and natural life" and considered that the life of a hero must be the ideal (paideia) of human life.
Diogenes further radicalized Antisthenes' contention of being independent of society's ethical conventions and intended to maintain the Cynic non-disgrace which may be understood in the sense of being cynical in the contemporary sense.
www.csudh.edu /phenom_studies/ethics/lect_2.htm   (5832 words)

  
 Antisthenes - WCD (Wiki Classical Dictionary)   (Site not responding. Last check: )
Antisthenes (c.445-c.365) was in the decade after the death of Socrates the most important Athenian philosopher.
Like his master, he tried to find out what words mean, but he was convinced that it was not possible to establish really good definitions (which brought him into conflict with Plato).
Antisthenes added that one also had to be strong enough ("as strong as Socrates") to pursue what was good.
www.ancientlibrary.com /wcd/Antisthenes   (148 words)

  
 First Presbyterian Pulpit
Antisthenes' story is set almost 2,000 years ago in what was then the most important city in Asia Minor - Ephesus.
As teachers came and went, Antisthenes and the other elders began to sit, not so much as learners anymore, but rather as judges, testing everything that they heard by a system of doctrine that by now was carved in their minds in stone.
Antisthenes and the rest of the old guard were not the only ones who felt it.
www.presbyterianwarren.com /ephesus.html   (2463 words)

  
 Khan Amore's Highlights of Ancient Greek Philosophy: Antisthenes, Diogenes, and Cynicism
Antisthenes to take him as a disciple, whereupon he plunged whole-heartedly into a life of austerity and self-mortification.
  Antisthenes was borne of a slave, while Diogenes was a bankrupt banker, and at first Antisthenes found it difficult to regard a banker — even one who was temporarily down on his luck — as a member of the downtrodden lower classes, and thereby suitable to receive his teachings.
Antisthenes, seeking independence in everything, complained that he could not satisfy his hunger as solitarily as he could assuage his lust.
www.hypatia-lovers.com /AncientGreeks/Section18.html   (2181 words)

  
 The Diogenes Report: Israel, Middle East, Arabs & Politics
Antisthenes was probably more consciously philosophical though less clever than his pupil Diogenes.
Antisthenes emphasized moral self-mastery and is said to have rejected government, property, marriage and religion.
Antisthenes ordered him away and eventually beat him with his staff.
www.diogenesreport.com /was.htm   (1909 words)

  
 BMCR-L: BMCR 01.06.23, Navia, Antisthenes of Athens: Setting the World Aright
When Antisthenes' name does appear, what is said is usually of little interest, either too evasive on a given thorny issue, or too dependent on outdated scholarly traditions ultimately rooted in Diogenes Laertius or prejudices about "cynic" attitudes (serious Cynic ideas having been out of the question until recently).
And indeed for Antisthenes, as distinct from Diogenes of Sinope, we have contemporary testimony in Xenophon, Aristotle and, enigmatically, Plato, all in their own ways reliable authors who probably knew Antisthenes personally and at least wrote accounts intended to be credible to those who did.
According to N., Antisthenes' rejection of language, a biographical event, was "the prelude to his Cynic conversion," which finally occurred at Socrates' unjust death and was characterized by the cessation of all but the barest verbal activity.
omega.cohums.ohio-state.edu /mailing_lists/BMCR-L/2001/0157.php   (3080 words)

  
 Diogenes
Because Diogenes believed that virtue was better revealed in action than in theory, he made his life a protest against what he thought of as a corrupt society.
Antisthenes held that happiness is achieved by cultivating virtue for its own sake.
Their name is generally supposed to come from the Greek kynikos, "doglike," presumably a commentary on their severely critical philosophic style; or it may be derived from Cynosarges, the name of the gymnasium in which the group met under Antisthenes.
members.tripod.com /~Diogenes_MacLugh/diogenes.html   (2047 words)

  
 [No title]
He pursued the Cynic ideal of self-sufficiency, a life that was natural and not dependent upon the nonessential luxuries of civilization.
A student of ANTISTHENES, he is credited with the development of the chreia (moral epigram), with a scandalous attack of convention entitled Republic (which influenced ZENO OF CITIUM), and with tragedies illustrative of the human predicament.
The philosopher Diogenes of Sinope is said to have asked to be thrown from a bridge near the Cynosarges gymnasium when he was near the point of death (Aelian, Varia Historia 8.14.3).
www.lycos.com /info/sinope--philosophers.html   (487 words)

  
 Cynics, Epicureans, Stoics and Skeptics
The founder of Cynicism was Antisthenes, who was about forty when he watched Athens defeated in the Peloponnesian War.
In his old age his fame was enough that Alexander visited him and asked if there was any favor he wished, and Diogenes, the story goes, replied that he wanted only that Alexander stand out of his sunlight.
For most who had to struggle to get by the Cynics must have appeared as much the intellectual babblers that Antisthenes thought other philosophers to be.
www.fsmitha.com /h1/ch12phil.htm   (1909 words)

  
 The Socratics (After Socrates)
Of the influence which he exercised upon Aristippus, Antisthenes and Euclides, the “incomplete Socratics,” as they are commonly called, as well as upon the “complete Socratic,” Plato, something must now be said.
Contrary, Antisthenes, a rugged but not ungenerous nature, a hater of pleasure, troubled himself little about ethical theory and gave his life to the imitation of his master’s asceticism.
Of these propositions the one was intended to explain the attribution of various and even inconsistent epithets to the same particular at the same time, whilst the other was necessary to make this explanation available in the case of common terms other than the Socratic universals.
www.2020site.org /socrates/moraltheory.html   (1488 words)

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