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Topic: Antonine Wall


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In the News (Sun 21 Jul 19)

  
  Hadrian's Wall - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
The wall is entirely in England and south of the border with Scotland by 15 km in the west and 110 km in the east.
The wall was garrisoned by auxiliary (i.e., non-legionary) units of the army (non-citizens).
Antonine was unable to conquer the northern tribes and so when Marcus Aurelius became emperor, he abandoned the Antonine Wall and occupied Hadrian's Wall once again in 164.
en.wikipedia.org /wiki/Hadrian's_Wall   (1776 words)

  
 Antonine Wall - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
Construction of the Antonine Wall began in 142 CE during the reign of Antoninus Pius, and was completed in 144.
The wall was intended to replace Hadrian's Wall 160 km (100 miles) to the south, as the frontier of Britannia, but while the Romans did establish temporary forts and camps north of the wall, they did not conquer the Caledonians, and the Antonine Wall suffered many attacks.
The Antonine Wall was inferior to Hadrian's Wall in terms of scale and construction, but it was still an impressive achievement, considering that it was completed in only two years, at the northern edge of the Roman empire in what they perceived as a cold and hostile land.
en.wikipedia.org /wiki/Antonine_Wall   (409 words)

  
 THE ANTONINE WALL -
The Antonine Wall is an outstanding monument to the ingenuity and engineering prowess of the Roman army.
The forts were constructed in the same manner as the wall, generally using the wall itself for their northern rampart.
The Antonine Wall was abandoned after 20 years when the Roman army withdrew from Scotland in AD 164, pulling the northern frontier back down to Hadrian's Wall.
www.freewebs.com /antoninewall   (1187 words)

  
 Antonine Wall   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-11-07)
A new wall was constructed in the early 140s, named after the emperor, running the 37 miles/60 kilometres across the narrow neck of land between the Forth (Bo'ness) and the Clyde (Old Kilpatrick).
The Antonine Wall was built from blocks of turf, laid on a stone foundation.
The balance of evidence seems to indicate that the Antonine Wall was finally abandoned in about 164, and the Romans withdrew to Hadrian's Wall, which had been undergoing refurbishment since 158.
www.stephen.j.murray.btinternet.co.uk /a_wall.htm   (579 words)

  
 Antonine Wall   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-11-07)
Construction on the wall is thought to have been initiated in AD 139 by the governor of Britain, Q. Lollius Urbicus, during the imperial reign of Emperor Antoninus Pius.
To the north of the wall was a defensive ditch, separated from the wall by a berm of varying widths (there is no evidence of a uniform width of berm along the wall).
It is not known whether Antonine’s Wall was intended to be constructed as a temporary or permanent defense.
www.gettysburg.edu /academics/english/britain/roman/Antonine.html   (572 words)

  
 [No title]
The Antonine Wall, begun in AD 142 during the reign of the Roman emperor Antoninus Pius, consisted of a turf rampart set on a stone foundation stretching 37 miles across central Scotland.
In spite of the additional defenses, the Antonine Wall was abandoned after 20 years when the Roman army withdrew from Scotland in AD 164, pulling the northern frontier back down to Hadrian's Wall.
Britain were Hadrian's Wall between the Rivers Tyne and Solway and, farther north, the turf wall of Antoninus Pius between the Rivers Forth and Clyde.
www.cs.iastate.edu /~baojie/history/other/2002-12-24_greatwall.htm   (1115 words)

  
 THE ANTONINE WALL
The Antonine Wall in Scotland was the northernmost frontier of the Roman empire.
This station marks the eastern end of the Antonine Wall, and it is assumed that the Ravenna Cosmology again adopts the convention of listing stations in frontier systems from east to west, as is the case with the fort's along Hadrian's Wall.
The forts along the wall were adjoined to the rampart almost invariable by ninety-degree 'T-junctions', with the Wall itself forming the northern defences of the encampment, a notable exception to this rule being the fort at Bar Hill which is situated about twenty yards behind the Wall.
www.roman-britain.org /frontiers/antonine.htm   (1442 words)

  
 The Antonine Wall   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-11-07)
The Wall stretched from Old Kilpatrick on the Clyde to Bo'ness on the Forth, a distance of 60 kilometres.
The Wall was built of blocks of turf, laid on a stone foundation 4.2m wide.
Forts and fortlets attached to the rear of the Wall housed regiments of auxiliaries.
www.hunterian.gla.ac.uk /museum/romans/ANTONINE.HTM   (124 words)

  
 Antonine Wall --  Encyclopædia Britannica   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-11-07)
The wall was 14 to 16 feet (4 metres) wide and probably 10 feet (3 metres) high; a ditch 40 feet (12 metres) wide...
The wall extended from coast to coast across the width of northern Britain; it ran for 73 miles (118 km) from Wallsend (Segedunum) on the River Tyne in the east to Bowness on the Solway Firth in the west.
The Brigantes occupied the region south of the Antonine Wall, extending to the Humber estuary in the east and to the River Mersey in the west.
www.britannica.com /eb/article-9007907   (790 words)

  
 Antoine Wall
The Antonine Wall had a foundation of stone covered by earth and turf, It was 14 feet (4.2m) across at it’s base, and about ten feet high (3m) with a steep face and possibly topped with a palisade or fence.
In front of the wall was a V-shaped ditch 40 feet wide and 12 feet deep, and behind the wall was a road called the Military Way which linked the forts and signaling towers along it’s length.
The western terminal of the Antonine Wall was at Old Kilpatrick where little evidence of it's existence remains but in places along it's path in Bearsden and Falkirk parts of the wall are still visible.
www.overtounhouse.com /antonine.html   (576 words)

  
 Antonine Wall
The wall or rampart extended from Carriden on the Forth, two miles west from Blackness, and about the same distance east from Bo'ness, to West Kilpatrick on the Clyde.
Along the whole extent of the wall there was a vast ditch or prœtentura on the outward or north side, which was generally twenty feet deep and forty feet wide, and which, there is reason to believe, might be filled with water when occasion required.
This wall is called in the popular language of the country Grime's or Graham's Dyke.
www.electricscotland.com /history/falkirk/falkirk/antonine.htm   (458 words)

  
 Antonine Wall   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-11-07)
The wall stretches 60 [[kilometre]]s (37 [[mile]]s) from [[Old Kirkpatrick, ScotlandOld Kirkpatrick]] in [[West Dunbartonshire]] on the [[Firth of Clyde]] to [[Bo'ness]], [[Falkirk (council area)Falkirk]], on the [[Firth of Forth]].
The wall was intended to replace [[Hadrian's Wall]] 160 km (100 miles) to the south, as the frontier of ''[[Roman BritainBritannia]]'', but while the Romans did establish temporary forts and camps north of the wall, they never managed to conquer the [[PictsPictish]], and the Antonine Wall suffered many attacks.
The wall was typically an earth bank, about 4 meters high, with a wide [[ditch]] on the north side, and a [[Roman roadmilitary way]] or road on the south.
antoninewall.quickseek.com   (383 words)

  
 HADRIAN
One of Legio VI Victrix's greatest accomplishments was building a large section of Hadrian's Wall, a remarkable fortification that runs 80 miles across northern Britain dividing the relatively civilized southern province from the untamed north.
The path of Hadrian's Wall was originally traced by a series of forts stretching from Carlisle in the West to Corbridge in the east, a line now called the Stanegate Frontier.
Hadrian conceived of the wall as a means of stabilizing northern Britannia, which had been a hotbed of rebellion and unrest for decades.
www.legionsix.org /hadrian.htm   (1124 words)

  
 Scotland For Visitors -History - Antonine Wall
With three legions at his disposal he reclaimed an area to the North and marked another boundary which was to become known as the Antonine Wall.
The Antonine Wall's construction began in AD 142 during the reign of the Roman emperor Antoninus Pius.
In front of this wall a broad ditch was dug as part of the overall defenses, and the fill from this ditch formed a low mound to the north.
www.scotlandforvisitors.com /history/antonine.php   (342 words)

  
 Falkirk's Roman Connections
This wall, known as Hadrians Wall, was 73 miles long, and stretched from the Tyne to the Solway Firth.
He then ordered another wall to be erected, the Antonine Wall, which was to become the most Northerly frontier of one of the most vast and powerful Empires mankind has ever seen.
South of the wall itself ran a cobbled road, the 'Military Way' which linked a network of forts that were built along the wall at intervals of approximately 2 miles.
www.almac.co.uk /FalkirkTCM/Rome.htm   (1074 words)

  
 The Antonine Wall   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-11-07)
In the Drumchapel area, the wall runs from the Castlehill fort southwest to Peel Glen Road.
A length of the stone base of the wall was excavated prior to a road development and 12 metres had survived intact despite ploughing in the field (NS 521 725).
The wall goes across to Hutcheson Hill, where, on the southern slope (NS 5151 7236), a 2'10" x 2'2" distance slab was found in 1865 by Buchanan, inscribed
www.templum.freeserve.co.uk /history/roman/antoninewall.htm   (353 words)

  
 BBC NEWS | UK | Scotland | Roman wall builds heritage claim
The 37-mile (59km) long wall was named after Antoninus Pius, Roman emperor for 23 years from 138 AD and adopted son of the emperor Hadrian.
The Antonine Wall was abandoned in 160 AD and ruined parts of it survive to this day in Falkirk, Kirkintilloch, Polmont and Bearsden.
The Antonine Wall bid forms part of a joint application with Austria, Germany and Slovakia to secure protection for the empire's boundaries, which stretched from Iraq to the Black Sea.
news.bbc.co.uk /2/hi/uk_news/scotland/2789239.stm   (563 words)

  
 Romans in Scotland - The Antonine Wall   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-11-07)
The Antonine Wall was built by the soldiers of the Second Augusta, the Sixth Victrix, and the Twentieth Valeria Victrix legions (who were also responsible for the building of Hadrians Wall) some time around 142AD These units are testified by the inscriptions they set up on completion of certain lengths of the rampart.
The Antonine Wall is named after the Roman emperor Antoninus Pius who ordered its construction.Originally six forts were planned - Carriden, Mumrills, Castlecary, Bar Hill, Balmuildy and Old Kilpatrick with fortlets built in between.
Behind the wall was a cambered gravel road with drainage ditches either side - the Military Way- which allowed movement of troops and materials.
www.ourpasthistory.com /roman_scotland/roman_antonine.htm   (418 words)

  
 [No title]   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-11-07)
The British gov't has undertaken the preservation of the wall, which is one of the largest and most significant remains of the Roman occupation.
The 72-mile wall from the Tyne to the Solvay is built mostly of stone with at least 16 forts and will provide a defensive barrier against the Picts and other tribesmen to the north.
It has a renowned collection of artefacts, models and diagrams relating to the Wall, and a full-scale reconstruction of the Temple to Mithras at Carrawburgh along the Wall.
www.lyberty.com /encyc/articles/hadrian.html   (446 words)

  
 The Antonine Wall   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-11-07)
The Antonine Wall in Scotland was the northernmost frontier of the Roman empire, built around 142 AD by order of the emperor Antonine Pius, as a more northerly replacement of Hadrian’s Wall.
The Wall was occupied until the late 150s AD, when it was briefly abandoned and partially dismantled, it was then re-occupied until around 165 AD when the frontier was again withdrawn to Hadrian’s Wall.
The Romans pulled back to their northern frontier at Hadrian's Wall and it was not until the barbarian invasions from the north in AD 197, that the emperor Septimius Severus returned in AD 208 to restore order along the Scottish borders.
www.heritage.me.uk /misc/antonine_wall.htm   (334 words)

  
 Antonine Wall   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-11-07)
The 'Wall' stretched from Old Kilpatrick on the Clyde, to Carriden on the Forth, and formed the most northerly frontier of one of the most vast and powerful Empires mankind has ever seen.
Unlike the stone built Hadrian's Wall further south, The Antonine Wall, was a rampart of soil faced with turf, resting on a stone foundation.
Over the causeway across the Antonine ditch, lies a series of pits, called "lilia" these originally had a pointed stake at the bottom of each, and would have been concealed by branches to serve as a brutal trap for anyone attacking the fort.
www.falkirk-wheel.com /wheel/information/romans/roman.htm   (900 words)

  
 Page 6 - Antoninus to Severus   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-11-07)
The fact that the Antonine wall garrison was to be almost as numerous as that of Hadrian's wall despite the former being only half the size may be supporting evidence.
The writings of Cassius Dio, regarding the Maeatae tribe, would indicate that the Antonine wall was in use when he was collecting evidence, which would be about 197.
He records they live by the wall that divides Britain in two; from the location of the tribe this would be the Antonine wall.
www.geocities.com /brian_bleich/Britain/page6.html   (559 words)

  
 Antonine Wall   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-11-07)
It was defended until about 200, after which the frontier returned to Hadrian's Wall.
The Antonine Wall was built as a shorter and more practical alternative to Hadrian's Wall.
At least 16 forts garrisoned the wall and small fortlets and timber watchtowers were placed at intervals along it.
www.tiscali.co.uk /reference/encyclopaedia/hutchinson/m0016275.html   (185 words)

  
 The Antonine Wall, Scotland   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-11-07)
The Antonine Wall was thirty-seven miles long, half the length of Hadrian's Wall, and extended from between the Firth of Forth and the mouth of the River Clyde.
In front of the wall there was a deep ditch 40 feet wide and behind it ran a military road connecting its 18 small forts and the signaling towers between them.
Terence Odlin: The Antonine Wall and Hadrian's Wall
www.tartans.com /articles/antoninewall.html   (918 words)

  
 Romans and Frontiers - The Antonine Wall
The design of the new frontier was based on its predecessor in Northern England but, in contrast to Hadrian's Wall, the Antonine Wall was not built in stone, but of turf.
The ditch of at Watling Lodge on the Antonine Wall.
Here the ditch in front of the wall is very well preserved and has survived largely with its original dimensions.
www.britanniafilm.de /antonine01.html   (152 words)

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