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Topic: Antonines


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In the News (Sat 20 Jul 19)

  
  Rome and Romania, Roman Emperors, Byzantine Emperors, etc.
It is a long story -- Gibbon's version is now published in three large volumes [The Modern Library], and he only began with the Antonines.
The succession by appointment, adoption, or marriage of the Antonines is now seen for very nearly the last time.
The complexity of this, and of events, can be seen, not just in the following genealogy, but in the Chart of the Tetrarchy.
www.friesian.com /romania.htm   (13900 words)

  
  Antonines - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
The Antonines most often referred to were two successive Roman Emperors who ruled between A.D. and 180: Antoninus Pius and Marcus Aurelius, famous for their skilled leadership.
Also included in those usually considered to be "Antonines" were Lucius Verus (161–169) for a time co-emperor with Marcus Aurelius, and the infamous Commodus, son of Marcus Aurelius.
Edward Gibbon considers the reign of the Antonines, as well as those of their predecessors Nerva, Trajan, and Hadrian, the height of the Roman Empire (The Decline and Fall of the Roman Empire).
en.wikipedia.org /wiki/Antonines   (236 words)

  
 CHAPTER - THE EXTENT OF THE EMPIRE IN THE AGE OF THE ANTONINES
The principal conquests of the Romans were achieved under the republic; and the emperors, for the most part, were satisfied with preserving those dominions which had been acquired by the policy of the senate, the active emulations of the consuls, and the martial enthusiasm of the people.
Such, under the reign of the Antonines, were the six provinces of Gaul; the Narbonnese, Aquitaine, the Celtic, or Lyonnese, the Belgic, and the two Germanies.
In the time of the Antonines, the martial regions of Thrace, from the mountains of Haemus and Rhodope, to the Bosphorus and the Hellespont, had assumed the form of a province.
www.godrules.net /library/gibbon/82gibbon_a1.htm   (8066 words)

  
 CHAPTER - THE CONSTITUTION IN THE AGE OF THE ANTONINES
The sacred title of Augustus was always reserved for the monarch, whilst the name of Caesar was more freely communicated to his relations; and, from the reign of Hadrian, at least, was appropriated to the second person in the state, who was considered as the presumptive heir of the empire.
The two Antonines (for it is of them that we are now peaking,) governed the Roman world forty-two years, with the same invariable spirit of wisdom and virtue.
The forms of the civil administration were carefully preserved by Nerva, Trajan, Hadrian, and the Antonines, who delighted in the image of liberty, and were pleased with considering themselves as the accountable ministers of the laws.
www.godrules.net /library/gibbon/82gibbon_a3.htm   (7202 words)

  
 St. Anthony's Cross   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-10-18)
The Antonines, who wore a fl habit embellished with a large Tau cross, were granted the privilege of letting their pigs run free.
A medieval hospital was more of a nursing home than a place of active medical treatment, and the Antonine hospitals became associated with one of the nastier endemic diseases, ignis sacer, which became known as St. Anthony's fire.
Anthony's fire was never as common in England as it was on the mainland, partly because of climatic conditions, and partly because rye was not extensively grown or used on the island.
www.geocities.com /Athens/Pantheon/7756/anthony.html   (492 words)

  
 Chapter The Constitution In The Age Of The Antonines. of History of The Decline And Fall of The Roman Empire by Gibbon
Chapter The Constitution In The Age Of The Antonines.
The Constitution In The Age Of The Antonines.
The obvious definition of a monarchy seems to be that of a state, in which a single person, by whatsoever name he may be distinguished, is intrusted with the execution of the laws, the management of the revenue, and the command of the army.
www.bibliomania.com /2/1/62/109/25645/1.html   (671 words)

  
 [No title]   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-10-18)
Yet even, in the age of the Antonines, when the freedom of the city had been bestowed on the greater number of their subjects, it was still accompanied with very solid advantages.
The existence of a slave became an object of greater value, and though his happiness still depended on the temper and circumstances of the master, the humanity of the latter, instead of being restrained by fear, was encouraged by the sense of his own interest.
The progress of manners was accelerated by the virtue or policy of the emperors; and by the edicts of Hadrian and the Antonines, the protection of the laws was extended to the most abject part of mankind.
www.clas.ufl.edu /users/pcraddoc/dfgib/DF2MAIN.HTM   (9265 words)

  
 Chapter II: The Internal Prosperity In The Age Of The Antonines. Part I. - History Of The Decline And Fall Of The Roman ...   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-10-18)
It is not alone by the rapidity, or extent of conquest, that we should estimate the greatness of Rome.
Notwithstanding the fashionable irreligion which prevailed in the age of the Antonines, both the interest of the priests and the credulity of the people were sufficiently respected.
In their writings and conversation, the philosophers of antiquity asserted the independent dignity of reason; but they resigned their actions to the commands of law and of custom.
www.historicalbookarchive.com /22-5.html   (3164 words)

  
 The Antonines : The Roman Empire in Transition
In The Antonines, the eminent historian of classical history, Michael Grant, examines the vital role played by the Antonines in the development and expansion of the Roman Empire.
He suggests that the Antonines occasioned a major transition in Roman life politics, and that the period over which they presided witnessed extraordinary changes that heralded a new epoch to many.
The Antonines, he argues, were singularly responsible for ushering the Roman Empire from the ancient world to the early Medieval.
www.allbookstores.com /book/0415107547   (164 words)

  
 Chapter The Internal Prosperity In The Age Of The Antonines. of History of The Decline And Fall of The Roman Empire by ...
Chapter The Internal Prosperity In The Age Of The Antonines.
The Internal Prosperity In The Age Of The Antonines.
The obedient provinces of Trajan and the Antonines were united by laws, and adorned by arts.
www.bibliomania.com /2/1/62/109/25644/1.html   (798 words)

  
 Roman Civilization Bates College Winter 2002 - M. Imber
According to Gibbon, the era of the Antonines, was perhaps the best time to be alive in the history of the west.
Thus, our survey of the Antonines will be pre-occupies less with biography (though there will be some) than with a study of how the imperial system worked.
Nerva, Trajan and Hadrian were not technically members of the Antonine family, but they and the Antonines are typically studied together because the rule of the five good emperors (as they're called) was a prolonged period of peace, prosperity and stability within Rome.
abacus.bates.edu /~mimber/Rciv02/w11c1.lec.htm   (3024 words)

  
 Amazon.co.uk: The Antonines: Roman Empire in Transition: Books   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-10-18)
The Antonines - Antonius, Pius, Marcus Aurelius, Lucius Verus and Commodus - played a crucial part in the development of the Roman Empire, controlling its huge machine for half a century of its most testing period.
The importance of the Antonines is manifold, but it mainly lies in the fact that they represented an `age of transition'.
The Antonines - Antonius, Pius, Marcus Aurelius, Lucius Verus and Commodus - played a crucial part in the development of the Roman Empire, controlling its expansive machine for half a century if its most testing period.
www.amazon.co.uk /exec/obidos/ASIN/0415138140   (523 words)

  
 Chapter II: The Internal Prosperity In The Age Of The Antonines. Part III. - History Of The Decline And Fall Of The ...   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-10-18)
They were encouraged by the Antonines, as they contributed to the happiness of the people.
It may not be unpleasing to collect a few scattered instances relative to that subject without forgetting, however, that from the vanity of nations and the poverty of language, the vague appellation of city has been indifferently bestowed on Rome and upon Laurentum.
I. Ancient Italy is said to have contained eleven hundred and ninety- seven cities; and for whatsoever aera of antiquity the expression might be intended, ^74 there is not any reason to believe the country less populous in the age of the Antonines, than in that of Romulus.
www.historicalbookarchive.com /22-7.html   (3235 words)

  
 The Decline And Fall Of The Roman Empire - Chapter I
The extent and military force of the Roman empire, in the age of the Antonines.
Notwithstanding this difference in their personal conduct, the general system of Augustus was equally adopted and uniformly pursued by Hadrian and by the two Antonines.
Such, under the reign of the Antonines, were the six provinces of Gaul - the Narbonnese, Aquitaine, the Celtic, or Lyonnese, the Belgic, and the two Germanies.
www.ccel.org /g/gibbon/decline/volume1/chap1.htm   (8036 words)

  
 [No title]   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-10-18)
Today's world should include the countries that comprised the Roman empire in the time of Trajan and the Antonines (the subject of the excerpt from Gibbon's Decline and Fall of the Roman Empire).
Some research will be required to ascertain or determine what countries, as defined by today's names and borders, were included in the Roman empire of Trajan and the Antonines, though some of these are mentioned by name in the excerpt.
Your source about the ancient Roman empire (other than the specific areas or countries included in the empire of Trajan and the Antonines) is strictly to be the excerpt from Ch.
www.aug.edu /~nprinsky/Engl1101/GIBB-OCE.htm   (446 words)

  
 Roman Civilization Bates College Winter 2002 - M. Imber Antonines, Christianity
His administrative policies continued those of Nerva, Trajan and Hadrian (good administration, reasonable taxation, support for alimentary schemes, good gladiatorial games, donatives to the soldiers and food and money for the people).
He was not the builder that his predecessors had been, completing Hadrian's projects, but thereafter limiting himself to upkeep work on roads and aqueducts (and the Antonine wall, extending the Roman frontier in Britain).
He conciously cultivated the Senate but it was his own abilities as administrator which served Rome so well.
abacus.bates.edu /~mimber/Rciv02/w11c2.lec.htm   (4540 words)

  
 Historia Augusta
To this, moreover, must be added the great desire of the senate and people for Alexander, now that they had been delivered from that scourge who had not only sullied the name of the Antonines but brought shame upon the Roman Empire.
The first Augustus was the first founder of this Empire, and to his name we all succeed, either by some form of adoption or by hereditary claim.
And when they had cried this out many times, Alexander Augustus spoke: "It would be easier, O Conscript Fathers, to take the name of the Antonines, for in so doing I should make some concession either to kinship or to a joint possession in that imperial name.
www.severusalexander.com /historia.htm   (14958 words)

  
 Rome - Vol I, Chapter II, Part 1
   Part I.    Of The Union And Internal Prosperity Of The Roman Empire, In The Age Of The Antonines.
We may be well assured, that a writer, conversant with the world, would never have ventured to expose the gods of his country to public ridicule, had they not already been the objects of secret contempt among the polished and enlightened orders of society.
   Notwithstanding the fashionable irreligion which prevailed in the age of the Antonines, both the interest of the priests and the credulity of the people were sufficiently respected.
www.cca.org /cm/rome/vol1/ch0201.html   (1866 words)

  
 Best of Gibbon's DECLINE & FALL
Two Antonines; reigns the only period of history in which the happiness of a great people was the sole object of government
Arles, the seat of government and commerce, was appointed for the place of the assembly, which regularly continued twenty-eight days, from the fifteenth of August to the thirteenth of September of every year.
The privileges of the subject would have secured the throne of the monarch; the abuses of an arbitrary administration might have been prevented, in some degree, or corrected, by the interposition of these representative assemblies; and the country would have been defended against a foreign enemy by the arms of natives and freemen.
www.his.com /~z/gibbon.html   (16269 words)

  
 Roman and USA Peace   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-10-18)
Latin literature enjoyed its "Silver Age" under the Antonines, with the majority of great authors, such as Tacitus, Juvenal, and Pliny the Younger, having begun their careers under Domitian.
was the "Age of the Antonines" (the 1st - 3rd centuries AD).
hostile Greek men of letters, writing in the Age of the Antonines, which Gibbon long afterwards was to adjudge the period when the human race attained its highest point of felicity.
4dw.net /nonconformer/Future/roman_peace.html   (611 words)

  
 Amazon.com: The Antonines: The Roman Empire in Transition: Books   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-10-18)
Grant reviews Antonine art, architecture, literature, and rhetoric, arguing that thematically (the rejection even by pagan writers of classical paganism) and in style and form (the works of Apuleius presage the modern novel) Antonine culture marks a transition from the ancient to the early medieval world.
The second focuses on the art and architecture of the Antonine period, from busts and statues to theatres, expanded by many pictures and Grant concludes with a chapter on the Antonine Age.
The work comes through as a neat biographical history of the Antonine Emperors and the leading literay and artistic names of the period.
www.amazon.com /exec/obidos/tg/detail/-/0415138140?v=glance   (1419 words)

  
 MSN Encarta - Search Results - Antonines
Antonines, the name of a dynasty of the Roman Empire, beginning with Titus Aurelius Antoninus (reigned ad 138-161), who was entitled Antoninus Pius...
The dynasty of the Antonines began in 96 with the murder of Domitian and his succession by Nerva:...
Help with Spanish, French, German, and Italian homework.
uk.encarta.msn.com /Antonines.html   (66 words)

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