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Topic: Antoninus Pius


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In the News (Sun 26 May 19)

  
  Antoninus Pius
Antoninus was afterwards proconsul in Asia, where his remarkable administrative qualities attracted the attention of the Emperor, who admitted him to the "Consilium Principis" on his return to Rome.
The only extension of the Roman territory in the reign of Antoninus was in Britain, where a new wall was built at the foot of the Caledonian mountains between the Forth and the Clyde, considerably farther north than the wall of Hadrian.
In his "Apology" to Marcus Aurelius he speaks of "letters" addressed by Antoninus Pius to the Larissæans, the Thessalonians, the Athenians, and to all the Greeks, forbidding all tumultuous outbreaks against the Christians.
www.catholicity.com /encyclopedia/a/antoninus_pius.html   (1369 words)

  
 Antoninus Pius - LoveToKnow 1911   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-10-18)
ANTONINUS PIUS [TITUS AURELIUS FULVUS BOIONIUS [[Arrius Antoninus],]] (A.D. 86-161), Roman emperor A.D. 138161, the son of Aurelius Fulvus, a Roman consul whose family had originally belonged to Nemausus (Nimes), was born near Lanuvium on the 19th of September 86.
After the death of his father, he was brought up under the care of Arrius Antoninus, his maternal grandfather, a man of integrity and culture, and on terms of friendship with the younger Pliny.
Having filled with more than usual success the offices of quaestor and praetor, he obtained the consulship in 120; he was next chosen one of the four consulars for Italy, and greatly increased his reputation by his conduct as proconsul of Asia.
www.1911encyclopedia.org /Antoninus_Pius   (656 words)

  
 Antoninus Pius: 138-161
Antoninus Pius is regarded as one of the "Five Good Emperors" in Roman history.
Antoninus restored the status of the senate without losing any of the imperial powers, improved and strengthen the great bureaucratic machinery of the Empire and was a great builder, especially in Italy.
The reign of Antoninus was a period of peace and calm.
www.thenagain.info /WebChron/mediterranean/AntoniusPius.html   (469 words)

  
 Antoninus Pius - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
Titus Aurelius Fulvus Boionius Arrius Antoninus Pius (September 19, 86–March 7, 161) was Roman emperor from 138 to 161.
Antoninus had been entrusted with the government of this province as proconsul.
Antoninus in many ways was the ideal of the landed gentleman praised not only by ancient Romans, but also by later scholars of classical history, such as Edward Gibbon or the author of the article on Antoninus Pius in the ninth edition of the Encyclopedia Britannica:
en.wikipedia.org /wiki/Antoninus_Pius   (1288 words)

  
 Antoninus Pius (via CobWeb/3.1 planetlab1.netlab.uky.edu)   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-10-18)
Emperor Antoninus Pius Titus Aurelius Fulvius Boionius Arrius Antoninus Pius (September 19, 86 - March 7, 161) was Roman Emperor from 138 to 161.
Having discharged the offices of quaestor and praetor, and twice served as consul, Antoninus was appointed by the Emperor Hadrian as one of the four ex-consuls to administer Italy, then greatly increased his reputation by his conduct as proconsul of Asia.
Antoninus died of fever at Lorium in Etruria, about 12 miles from Rome, on March 7, 161, giving the keynote to his life in the last word that he uttered when the tribune of the night-watch came to ask the password -- "Equanimity".
antoninus-pius.iqnaut.net.cob-web.org:8888   (772 words)

  
 Roman Emperors - DIR Anastasius
The long reign of the emperor Antoninus Pius is often described as a period of peace and quiet before the storm which followed and plagued his successor, Marcus Aurelius.
Antoninus approved the appointment of kings for the Armenians, for the Lazi, and for the Quadi and he successfully prevented a Parthian attack on Armenia by sending the Parthian king a letter of warning.
Antoninus' legislation included protections for slaves, freedmen, and for illegitimate children and further defined family and inheritance law, including consideration of a daughter's wishes in marriage arrangements.
www.roman-emperors.org /tonypis.htm   (2325 words)

  
 Antoninus Pius - WCD (Wiki Classical Dictionary)   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-10-18)
Antoninus successfully fought for the apotheosis, and this is reported to have earned him the name Pius (roughly "fulfilling of duties", mainly in a family sense).
Antoninus Pius had a lucky time as far as military activity was concerned, having largely to deal only with real trouble in Britain and Mauretania.
Pius received a favourable impression surviving late antiquity, and this may be in part due to his somewhat tenuous association with the early Christian movement.
www.ancientlibrary.com /wcd/Antoninus_Pius   (751 words)

  
 Antoninus Pius
Antoninus, if already respected before his accession, quickly won the goodwill of the senators, for being a moderate ruler, who was respectful of the ancient institution of the senate.
Antoninus did not travel the empire like his predecessor, in fact he hardly ever left the capital at all during his 23-year rule.
If Antoninus' reign is much known for its peace and tranqulity, it is due to the calm of the man, rather than due to there being true peace along the borders of he empire.
www.roman-empire.net /highpoint/antoninus.html   (1324 words)

  
 Antoninus Pius - by Julius Capitolinus   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-10-18)
Titus Aurelius Fulvus Boionius Antoninus Pius was descended, on his father's side, from a family which came from the country of Transalpine Gaul, more specifically, from the town of Nimes.
Antoninus himself was born at an estate at Lanuvium on the thirteenth day before the Kalends of October in the twelfth consulship of Domitian and first of Cornelius Dolabella.
The board of Antoninus Pius was rich yet never open to criticism, frugal yet not stingy; his table was furnished by his own slaves, his own fowlers and fishers and hunters.
members.aol.com /antoninus1/piety/pius.htm   (2656 words)

  
 AN ABRIDGED HISTORY OF ROME - PART I - IX - FROM NERVA TO MARCUS AURELIUS
Antoninus ruled for 23 years: they were almost uneventful years: he acted as a sort of constitutional monarch, returning to the Senate and to the other Roman institutions most of their ancient decisional power.
Antoninus, most likely to distance himself from Hadrian's behaviour, emphasized his attachment to these values by erecting several temples dedicated to his deceased wife Annia Faustina Maior and by founding charitable institutions for the assistance of young women, named after her puellae Faustinianae.
Marcus Aurelius and Lucius Verus erected a column to Antoninus Pius near today's Piazza di Montecitorio; the column is lost, but the fine reliefs at its base are in the Vatican Museums.
www.romeartlover.it /Storia9.html   (2054 words)

  
 Highbeam Encyclopedia - Search Results for Antoninus   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-10-18)
Antoninus, Saint ANTONINUS, SAINT [Antoninus, Saint], 1389-1459, Italian churchman, b.
Antoninus, Wall of ANTONINUS, WALL OF [Antoninus, Wall of] ancient Roman wall extending across N Britain from the Firth of Forth to the Firth of Clyde.
2 The younger (c.125-176), daughter of Antoninus Pius and the elder Faustina, was the wife of Marcus Aurelius.
www.encyclopedia.com /SearchResults.aspx?Q=Antoninus   (626 words)

  
 History of the Origins of Christianity. Book VI. The Reigns of Hadrian and Antoninus Pius. (A.D. 117-161)   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-10-18)
Certainly Antoninus and Marcus Aurelius were vastly his superiors in virtue, but under them the world was getting sad and losing its gaiety, was beginning to wear the monk’s cowl and become Christian; superstition was on the increase.
Antoninus was a St Louis as far as heart and rectitude went, with much more judgment, and a wider range of intellect.
A fact which does this sovereign infinite honour, is that the principal advocate of Christianity ventured to address him with full confidence, in order to obtain redress from a legal situation which he reasonably found unjust and unbecoming in such a fortunate reign.
www.ccel.org /ccel/renan/hadrian_pius.xvii.html?bcb=0   (2139 words)

  
 Article: Temple of Antoninus and Faustina
In 144 a statue dedicated to Antoninus Pius was placed near the temple by the Bakers' Guild (CIL VI 1002).
In connection with the ceremonies at the death of Antoninus Pius in 161, the Senate added the name of the newly deified emperor to the temple already dedicated to his wife: thus the words TO THE DEIFIED ANTONINUS AND were added to the architrave.
The temple of Antoninus and Faustina rises on a foundation of concrete with chunks of basalt above which is a course of travertine blocks.
www.cvrlab.org /Library/LTUR/LTURAntoninus.html   (860 words)

  
 MRA - Crown Collection of Antiquarian Coins
Antoninus in many ways was the ideal of the landed gentleman praised not only by ancient Romans like Varro and Cato the Elder, but later scholars of classical history, such as Edward Gibbon or the author of the article on Antoninus Pius in the ninth edition of the Encyclopedia Britannica:
The image of Antoninus' famous successor Marcus Aurelius, who Antoninus Pius adopted as a son and designated his successor on February 25, 138, indicates that Antoninus was making efforts to publicize and gain support for his successor in order to extend the relative calm of his reign into his successor’s.
The emperor Antoninus Pius died on March 7, 161, but not before clearly indicating to magistrates and senate alike his desire that Marcus succeed him by having the statue of Fortuna, which had been in his bedroom, transferred to Marcus.
www.minervanet.org /archives/a15.htm   (889 words)

  
 Antoninus Pius
Antoninus Pius, vollständiger Name Titus Aelius Hadrianus Antonius, (86-161), römischer Kaiser (138-161), geboren in Lorium (Latien) als Sohn einer namhaften römischen Familie.
Antoninus Pius, full name Titus Aurelius Fulvus Antoninus (86-161), Roman emperor (138-161), born in Lanuvium (now Lanuvio, Italy), of a distinguished Roman family.
Antoninus acquired the name Pius ("dutiful" or "conscientious"), probably because of his insistence that divine honours be accorded his predecessor.
www.uni-klu.ac.at /archeo/chrono/pius.htm   (482 words)

  
 History of the Origins of Christianity. Book VI. The Reigns of Hadrian and Antoninus Pius. (A.D. 117-161) | Christian ...   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-10-18)
This was to address himself to the Emperor Antoninus and his two associates, Marcus Aurelius and Lucius Verus, in order to obtain redress for a position which he rightly looked upon as unjust and in contradiction to the liberal principles of the government.
The two titles of Pius and Philosophus obliged those who bear them only to love what is true, and 199to renounce ancient opinions if they find them bad.
Antoninus and Marcus Aurelius did not know the Hebrew literature; if they had known it, they would certainly have found good Justin’s exegesis very trifling.
www.ccel.org /ccel/renan/hadrian_pius.xxi.html   (3635 words)

  
 Antoninus Pius
Pius was required to adopt both the young Marcus Aurelius and the even younger son of Aelius, Lucius Verus.
Antoninus was a devout practitioner of the Roman religion and may of his coins honor
Pius was 52 when he became Emperor and in his mid seventies at death.
dougsmith.ancients.info /acmpius.html   (1860 words)

  
 Antoninus Pius Caesar
The other 'side' of this coin was shown when the Caesar Antoninus Pius hesitated to assume the title of Augustus upon the death of his adoptive father Hadrian.
Antoninus Pius had filled in as Emperor during the extended final illness of Hadrian.
A man of middle age at the time of his ascension, Pius is easily distinguished from the younger Caracalla and Elagabalus who bore his name.
dougsmith.ancients.info /feac61piu.html   (626 words)

  
 antoninus pius
Antoninus Pius was brought up in the town of Lorium, twelve miles from Rome.
Antoninus was probably a student of the Greek philosopher, Epictetus.
At the beginning of his reign Antoninus refused to punish the men whose names were brought to him, saying, “I must not begin my career as your leader with such deeds”.
www.jamboree.freedom-in-education.co.uk /real_history/antoninus.htm   (492 words)

  
 Antoninus Pius
Executive summary: Roman Emperor, 138-161 AD Roman emperor during 131 to 161 AD, the son of Aurelius Fulvus, a Roman consul whose family had originally belonged to Nemausus (Nimes), was born near Lanuvium on the 19th of September 86.
One of his first acts was to persuade the senate to grant divine honors to Hadrian, which they had at first refused; this gained him the title of Pius (dutiful in affection).
Antoninus died of fever at Lorium in Etruria, about 12 miles from Rome, on the 7th of March 161, giving the keynote to his life in the last word that he uttered when the tribune of the night-watch came to ask the password -- aequanimitas.
www.nndb.com /people/975/000087714   (601 words)

  
 The Five Good Emperors of Ancient Rome - Nerva, Trajan, Hadrian, Antoninus Pius and Marcus Aurelius
These emperors were Nerva, Trajan, Hadrian, Antoninus Pius and Marcus Aurelius.
Antoninus was called Pius by his citizens for the respect he paid to Hadrian's memory.
When Antoninus Pius died Marcus Aurelius was left to rule together with Varus but unfortunately the latter died soon after.
www.mariamilani.com /ancient_rome/rome_five_good_emperors.htm   (1204 words)

  
 Antoninus Pius - Portrait Gallery of Roman Emperors on Coins
Antoninus Pius was born in 86 AD, the son of Aurelius Fulvius and Arria Fadilla.
Antoninus became emperor on the death of Hadrian later that year, having been virtually the ruler for the last month of Hadrian's reign.
Chinese history records that they received the first delegation from the Roman Empire under the reign of Antoninus, but it is more likely to have been under Marcus Aurelius, and the confusion would have been because of the similarity in their names, as he took the name Antoninus in honour of his sponsor.
www.24carat.co.uk /antoninuspius.html   (437 words)

  
 Adoptive AD 97 - 192, Ancient Roman coins - Calgary Coin Gallery
Faustina Senior was married to Antoninus Pius before he came to the throne in AD 138 and unfortunately she died less than three years later in AD 141.
Antoninus Pius must have held her in very high regard as he never re-married, and continued to strike coins in her honour, with her name and image, until the end of his reign.
Marcus later married Faustina Jr, the daughter of Antoninus Pius, and by her fathered at least thirteen children, including the future emperor Commodus.
www.calgarycoin.com /roman4.htm   (640 words)

  
 (96) Antoninus Pius   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-10-18)
Hadrian adopted Antoninus Pius as his heir in A.D. 138, compelling him in turn to adopt Marcus Aurelius and Lucius Verus, who were too young to be made direct successors.
Hadrian died the same year, and Antoninus convinced the Senate to consecrate his predecessor as divine (hence, probably, the name Pius, "faithful to familial obligations").
Although traditionally scholars distinguish three portrait bust types for Antoninus, all of his numismatic portraits seem to conform to the first of these, which is distinguished by a full head of wavelike hair, with three central locks over the forehead (most likely a reference to Augustus).
www.lawrence.edu /dept/art/buerger/catalogue/096.html   (365 words)

  
 CATHOLIC ENCYCLOPEDIA: Marcus Aurelius Antoninus
In all the later years of the life of Antoninus Pius, Marcus was his constant companion and adviser.
Marcus was scarcely seated on the throne when the Picts commenced to threaten in Britain the recently erected Wall of Antoninus.
Throughout the reigns of Trajan, Hadrian, and Antoninus Pius, the procedure followed by Roman authorities in their treatment of the Christians has that outlined in Trajan's rescript to Pliny, by which it was ordered that the Christians should not be sought out; if brought before the courts, legal proof of their guilt should be forthcoming.
www.newadvent.org /cathen/02109a.htm   (2253 words)

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