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Topic: Aphasia


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In the News (Fri 14 Dec 18)

  
  Aphasia Hope Foundation
I am afraid it sounds as though the staff in the nursing home where your mother lives have a lot to learn about aphasia!.
Aphasia Hope Foundation is a 501(c)3 non-profit foundation that has a two-fold mission: (1) to promote research into the prevention and cure of aphasia and (2) to ensure that all survivors of aphasia and their caregivers are aware of and have access to the best possible treatments available.
Aphasia is a speech/language disorder that impairs a person's ability to communicate.
www.aphasiahope.org   (675 words)

  
  Aphasia - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
Aphasia (also Aphemia - from Greek α, without, and φημη, speech), is a loss or impairment of the ability to produce and/or comprehend language, due to brain damage.
Aphasia may also develop slowly, as in the case of a brain tumor.
Broca's aphasia is thus characterized as a nonfluent aphasia.
en.wikipedia.org /wiki/Aphasia   (1506 words)

  
 Receptive aphasia - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
In Broca's aphasia, the area typically lost is highlighted in blue.
Receptive aphasia, also known as Wernicke's aphasia, fluent aphasia, or sensory aphasia in clinical neuropsychology and cognitive neuropsychology, is a type of aphasia often (but not always) caused by neurological damage to Wernicke's area in the brain (Brodman Area 22, in the posterior part of the superior temporal gyrus of the dominant hemisphere).
Patients who recover from Wernicke's aphasia report that while aphasic they found the speech of others to be unintelligible, and even though they knew they were speaking, they could neither stop themselves nor understand what they had just said.
en.wikipedia.org /wiki/Wernicke's_aphasia   (346 words)

  
 Aphasia Institute | Welcome
Aphasia is an acquired disorder caused by an injury to the brain and affects a person's ability to communicate.
Aphasia is an acquired disorder caused by injury to the brain and affect a person's ability to communicate.
Aphasia is a part of the diagnosis in one third of all stroke survivors.
www.aphasia.ca /about/whatis.html   (262 words)

  
 Aphasia - MossRehab ResourceNet
Aphasia usually occurs suddenly, often as the result of a stroke or head injury, but it may also develop slowly, as in the case of a brain tumor.
Aphasia is usually first recognized by the physician who treats the individual for his or her brain injury.
Aphasia research is exploring new ways to evaluate and treat aphasia as well as to further understanding of the function of the brain.
www.mossresourcenet.org /aphasia.htm   (1128 words)

  
 Aphasia
Wernicke's aphasia is caused by damage to the temporal lobe, or the side portion, of the language-dominant area of the brain.
Transcortical aphasia is caused by damage to the language areas of the left hemisphere that are outside the primary language areas.
Aphasia is rare in children, but the symptoms can begin with speech delays and progress to the loss of communication skills in all areas.
www.hmc.psu.edu /healthinfo/a/aphasia.htm   (1297 words)

  
 Speech Pathology Community for Parent and Speech Pathologist Jobs Speech-Language Pathologist Resources, Continuing ...
Aphasia is an acquired disorder caused by brain damage which affects a person's ability to communicate.
The principal signs of aphasia are impairments in the ability to express oneself when speaking, trouble understanding speech, and difficulty with reading and writing.
Aphasia is most often the result of stroke or head injury, but can also occur in other neurological disorders, such as brain tumor or Alzheimer's disease.
www.speech-pathology.org /pathologists/sdisorder/aphasia.html   (510 words)

  
 eMedicine - Aphasia : Article by Daniel H Jacobs, MD   (Site not responding. Last check: )
In Wernicke aphasia, neighborhood signs include a superior quadrantanopsia due to involvement of optic radiations, limb apraxia due to involvement of the inferior parietal lobule or its connections to the premotor cortices, finger agnosia, acalculia, or alexia with agraphia (components of the Gerstmann syndrome) due to involvement of the angular gyrus.
Pulvinar strokes causing aphasia are exceedingly rare because of the vascular anatomy of the thalamus.
Aphasia is diagnosed on the basis of localization (involvement of the left hemisphere or thalamus); therefore, careful, thorough mental-state examination is essential.
www.emedicine.com /neuro/topic437.htm   (5694 words)

  
 Nominal aphasia: Facts and details from Encyclopedia Topic   (Site not responding. Last check: )
Aphasia is a loss or impairment of the ability to produce or comprehend language, due to brain damage....
Expressive aphasia, known as brocas aphasia in clinical neuropsychology and agrammatic aphasia in cognitive neuropsychology, is an aphasia...
Receptive aphasia, also known as wernickes aphasia in clinical neuropsychology and neologistic jargonaphasia in cognitive neuropsychology, is a...
www.absoluteastronomy.com /encyclopedia/n/no/nominal_aphasia.htm   (636 words)

  
 Aphasia   (Site not responding. Last check: )
Aphasia is condition characterized by either partial or total loss of the ability to communicate verbally or using written words.
Global aphasia is caused by widespread damage to the language areas of the left hemisphere.
This type of aphasia is associated with injuries to areas of the brain typically not identified with language and language processing.
www.lifesteps.com /gm/Atoz/ency/aphasia.jsp   (2270 words)

  
 Aphasia -- eCureMe.com
Aphasia is an impairment of the ability to use or comprehend (and express) language (i.e.
Aphasia is often the result of damage to the language areas of the brain located in the left hemisphere.
Transient aphasia refers to a temporary condition involving problems with communication, whereas global aphasia describes a condition in which extensive portions of the brain have been damaged, resulting in severe and permanent communication difficulties.
www.ecureme.com /emyhealth/data/Aphasia.asp   (331 words)

  
 Aphasia   (Site not responding. Last check: )
Aphasia is a disorder that results from damage to language centers of the brain.
The most common cause of aphasia is stroke, but gunshot wounds, blows to the head, other traumatic brain injury, brain tumor, and other sources of brain damage can also cause aphasia.
It usually requires extra effort for the person with aphasia to understand spoken messages, as if he or she is trying to comprehend a foreign language.
www.asha.org /public/speech/disorders/Aphasia_info.htm   (1726 words)

  
 aphasia
APHASIA - Aphasia is a language disorder caused by damage to the temporal lobe or higher up in the frontal lobe.
The principal objective of the Aphasia Research Center is to advance the theoretical understanding, clinical evaluation, and management of language disorders produced by injury or dysfunction of the brain in adults.
Aphasia, a devastating disorder resulting from stroke, degenerative disease, or traumatic brain injury, profoundly affects the individual's ability to use and understand language.
www.ifip.com /aphasia.htm   (1618 words)

  
 Aphasia Information Page: National Institute of Neurological Disorders and Stroke (NINDS)
Aphasia is a neurological disorder caused by damage to the portions of the brain that are responsible for language.
Aphasia is not a disease, but a symptom of brain damage.
The outcome of aphasia is difficult to predict given the wide range of variability of the condition.
www.ninds.nih.gov /disorders/aphasia/aphasia.htm   (548 words)

  
 What aphasia is
For someone with expressive aphasia, many or all words are "on the tip of their tongue".
Aphasia is a language disorder that results from damage to portions of the brain that are responsible for language.
Aphasia usually occurs suddenly, frequently the result of a stroke or head injury, but it may also develop slowly as in the case of a brain tumor.
www.aphasia.net /info/aphasia/what_aphasia_is.htm   (345 words)

  
 Aphasia - MayoClinic.com
Aphasia is a communication disorder caused by damage to one or more regions of the brain that control language skills.
People with aphasia may not be able to express themselves verbally or in writing, or they may not understand spoken or written language.
The primary treatment for aphasia is speech-language therapy that focuses on relearning and practicing language skills and using alternative or complementary communication methods.
www.mayoclinic.com /health/aphasia/DS00685   (218 words)

  
 Questions and Answers About Aphasia   (Site not responding. Last check: )
Aphasia is an acquired communication disorder that impairs a person's ability to process language, but does not affect intelligence.
When a person acquires aphasia it is usually due to damage on the left side of the brain, which controls movements on the right side of the body.
Aphasia is not like Alzheimer's disease; for people with aphasia it is the ability to access ideas and thoughts through language - not the ideas and thoughts themselves - that is disrupted.
www.aphasia.org /NAAquestions_and_answers.html   (601 words)

  
 Aphasia   (Site not responding. Last check: )
The second form, Wernicke's aphasia, is a result of damage to the rear part of the left hemisphere of the brain.
The third form of aphasia is global aphasia, which is damage to the entire hemisphere, and results in a combination of Broca's and Wernicke's forms of aphasia.
However, aphasia is generally understandable to the non-medical person, and so it may be incorporated into a campaign with relative ease.
www.tesarta.com /www/resources/library/aphasia.html   (445 words)

  
 Aphasia: A Language Disorder
In physiological terms, Broca's aphasia and Wernicke's aphasia occur in the left hemisphere of the brain, which is responsible for controlling the right side of the body along with speech and language abilities.
Broca's aphasia affects the frontal lobe adjacent to the primary motor cortex, and Wernicke's aphasia affects the posterior portion of the first frontal lobe (3).
In this respect, Wernicke's aphasia is known as "fluent aphasia" (4).
serendip.brynmawr.edu /bb/neuro/neuro99/web1/Xiong.html   (1418 words)

  
 AphasiA - toronto-gothic music
As a result, AphasiA was driven to create haunting synthetic melodies that blend textured guitars, indignation, piercing vocals, sex, and aggressive drums to cure themselves of the frustrations stemming from the human condition.
AphasiA had first drawn from the angst ridden grunge era of their youth, but their sound continued to evolve due to the influence of industrial, rock and electronic music.
AphasiA's live performances have proven to be both intense and energetic, like their music it goes from one extreme emotion to another.
www.toronto-goth.com /culture/music/aphasia.shtml   (632 words)

  
 MedlinePlus Medical Encyclopedia: Speech impairment (adult)
Aphasia is impaired expression or comprehension of written or spoken language.
Aphasia is loss of communication skills previously learned and commonly occurs following strokes or in people with brain tumors or degenerative diseases that affect the language areas of the brain.
For aphasia, family members may need to provide frequent orientation reminders, such as what day it is, because disorientation and confusion often follow the onset of aphasia.
www.nlm.nih.gov /medlineplus/ency/article/003204.htm   (663 words)

  
 Aphasia
Aphasia is a complex acquired neurogenic disorder in which there are problems with speaking or speech is lost.
Aphasia may be the result of a severe head injury, lack of oxygen, or
Conduction aphasia is also known as disconnection syndrome because it is a lesion that disconnects Broca's area from Wernicke's area via the arcuate fasciculus and is characterized by a comparatively reduced ability to repeat spoken language.
www.people.virginia.edu /~jpd3n/aphasia.html   (266 words)

  
 [No title]
Aphasia - MossRehab ResourceNet - Aphasia is a language disorder that results from damage to portions of the brain that are responsible for language.
Aphasia Tavistock Trust - Bedfordshire-based charity whose aims are to establish clinics across the country, support research into speech and language therapy, and to determine the most cost-effective treatments.
Aphasia is the term used to describe an acquired impairment of language that results from brain damage.
www.diseasedirectory.net /Communication_Disorders/Language_and_Speech/Aphasia/default.aspx   (1256 words)

  
 aphasia
Aphasia is a language disorder that results from damage to the portion of the brain that is
Broca's aphasia results from damage to the front portion of the language dominant side of the brain.
This is contrary to the present theory that Broca's and Wernicke's aphasias are primarily disorders of language structure.
faculty.ed.umuc.edu /~jmatthew/articles/aphasia.html   (1030 words)

  
 Aphasia Assessment   (Site not responding. Last check: )
It does not refer to differentiating aphasia from chronic brain syndrome, for example, or to differentiation among the syndromes of aphasia.
Aphasia with sensorimotor involvement resembled aphasia with what may have been apraxia of speech.
Aphasia with scattered findings compatible with generalized brain damage usually including both visual and motor involvement.
www.d.umn.edu /~mmizuko/3411/may11.htm   (1015 words)

  
 Living in Aphasia   (Site not responding. Last check: )
"Living in Aphasia" is intended as an impressionistic collage depicting the recent fictional history of a small nation.
This ironic work also draws parallels between the illness aphasia and the natural difficulty in facing a foreign culture.
(Aphasia is a condition where the ability to understand or use language is severely impaired, in some cases to the point where even gestures are incomprehensible.) The idea of cultural confusion as illness is underscored with glimpses of medical information about this condition being almost subliminally revealed.
www.wethink.com.au /aphasia   (128 words)

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