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Topic: Apis (Egyptian mythology)


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In the News (Wed 17 Jul 19)

  
  The Probert Encyclopaedia - Egyptian Mythology
In Egyptian mythology, Duamutef was son of Horus and guardian of the East.
In Egyptian mythology, Serqet was the scorpion goddess.
In Egyptian mythology, Shu was the son of Atum and the brother of Tefnut.
www.fas.org /news/reference/probert/D2.HTM   (1359 words)

  
 Apis - LoveToKnow 1911
APIS or Hapis, the sacred bull of Memphis, in Egyptian Hp, Hape, Hope.
Apis was the most important of all the sacred animals in Egypt, and, like the others, its importance increased as time went on.
It is therefore remarkable that the priests contrived to bury one of the animals in the fourth year of Cambyses.
www.1911encyclopedia.org /Apis   (241 words)

  
  Apis (Egyptian mythology) - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
In Egyptian mythology, Apis or Hapis (alternatively spelt Hapi-ankh), was a bull-deity worshipped in the Memphis region.
Apis was originally the Ka (power/life-force) of Ptah, the chief god in the area around Memphis.
As he now represented Osiris, when the Apis bull reached the age of twenty-eight, the age when Osiris was said to have been killed by Set, symbolic of the lunar month, and the new moon, the bull was put to death with a great ceremony.
en.wikipedia.org /wiki/Apis_(Egyptian_mythology)   (1389 words)

  
 Apis (Egyptian mythology) flights Apis (Egyptian mythology)
The Apis bull had to be fl with a white triangular mark on his forehead, a pattern like the wings of a vulture on his back, double hairs on his tail, a crescent moon on his right flank, and a scarab mark under his tongue.
The Apis bull was described as “high of horns, beautiful of names, far-seer and wide-ranger.” The cult of the Apis bull started at the very beginning of Egyptian history, probably as a fertility god connected to grain and the herds.
Apis was the bull-god that, on reaching the age of twenty-eight, the age when Osiris was killed by Set, was put to death with a great ceremony.
www.find-ask.com /Encyclopedia/Apis_(Egyptian_mythology)/Apis_(Egyptian_mythology).html   (938 words)

  
 Egyptian Glossary   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-09-17)
This is the Egyptian word for gold, which was considered a divine metal, it was thought to be the flesh of the gods.
This seems to be the egyptian word for the forces that are god or a group of gods, although the exact meaning is unknown.
The dung-rolling beetle was, to the ancient Egyptians, a symbol of regeneration and spontaneous creation, as it seemed to emerge from nowhere; in fact it came from eggs previously laid in the sand.
members.aol.com /egyptart/glossary.html   (5374 words)

  
 Apis - WiccanWeb.ca   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-09-17)
In Egyptian Mythology, Apis or Hapis (alternatively spelt Hapi-ankh), was a bull-deity worshipped in the Memphis region.
Apis was originally the Ka (power/life-force) of Ptah, the chief god in the area around Memphis.
As he now represented Osiris, when the Apis bull reached the age of twenty-eight, the age when Osiris was said to have been killed by Set, symbolic of the lunar month, and the new moon, the bull was put to death with a great ceremony.
www.wiccanweb.ca /wiki/index.php/Apis   (1348 words)

  
 Apis (Disambiguation) - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
Apis, the nickname of Dragutin Dimitrijević of the Serbian Black Hand
Apis (One Piece), a fictional character in the Warship Island arc of the anime One Piece.
This is a disambiguation page: a list of articles associated with the same title.
en.wikipedia.org /wiki/Apis   (109 words)

  
 Mythical and Fantasy Creatures
Apis also known as Hapi, was one of Egypt's sacred animals which was a fl bull.
Apis was believed to be the reincarnation or 'glorious soul' of Ptah, who was said to have inseminated a virgin cow in the form of fire, and to have been born again as a fl bull.
Apis was let loose in the courtyard attached to his temple, and the priests would use his movements as a means for farseeing the future.
www.mythcreatures.co.uk /egyptian/apis.asp   (102 words)

  
 Egyptian Glossary
This is the Egyptian word for gold, which was considered a divine metal, it was thought to be the flesh of the gods.
This seems to be the egyptian word for the forces that are god or a group of gods, although the exact meaning is unknown.
The dung-rolling beetle was, to the ancient Egyptians, a symbol of regeneration and spontaneous creation, as it seemed to emerge from nowhere; in fact it came from eggs previously laid in the sand.
www.egyptartsite.com /glossary.html   (5374 words)

  
 Virtual Egyptian - Bronze statuette of Apis, Late Period
Apis (Hapi in Egyptian) was a live bull kept in the temple of Ptah, in Memphis.
Apis was enthroned in an elaborate ceremony, led out of the hall through the eastern (rising sun) door, and finally presented to the people massed outside for their first glimpse of the newly reincarnated god.
Apis’ birthday was celebrated in a seven-day festival during which he was brought out of his sanctuary and led in processions through the city, accompanied by a choir of singing boys.
www.virtual-egyptian-museum.org /Collection/Content/MET.SS.00094.html   (1971 words)

  
 Egyptian mythology - Internet-Encyclopedia.com   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-09-17)
Egyptian mythology (or Egyptian religion) is the name for the succession of beliefs held by the people of Egypt until the coming of Christianity and Islam.
Egyptian Mythology is different from Greek or Roman Mythology, in that in Egyptian Mythology most deities are of human body and animal head or vice versa.
Egyptians believed that the soul (or the Ka (human personality)) could survive death if the body was preserved.
www.internet-encyclopedia.com /ie/e/eg/egyptian_mythology_1.html   (2459 words)

  
 Egyptian Mythology - MSN Encarta
Egyptian Mythology, specifically, the religion of ancient Egypt.
The religious beliefs of the ancient Egyptians were the dominating influence in the development of their culture, although a true religion, in the sense of a unified theological system, never existed among them.
The Egyptian faith was based on an unorganized collection of ancient myths, nature worship, and innumerable deities.
encarta.msn.com /encyclopedia_761552103/Egyptian_Mythology.html   (657 words)

  
 EGYPTIAN MYTHOLOGY
Therefore, to the ancient Egyptian this diversity of beliefs and gods was acceptable, consequently each divine power was approached by a variety of images related to nature, animal and human life.
In the Egyptian view of the universe, both the divine and human worlds had come into being at the time of the creation, before which there were only an uncreated matter.
Egyptians were particularly religious people obsessed by death and burial however their preoccupation with the after life originated essentially from the Egyptian's devotion to life and the perfect harmony they found in the Egyptian environment.
www.telema.20m.com /egypt.htm   (3946 words)

  
 Reference.com/Encyclopedia/Apis (Egyptian mythology)
In Egyptian mythology, Apis (alternatively spelt Hapi-ankh), was originally a deificiation of the bull, in the Memphis region.
Apis was said to manifest itself as a real living bull, which, after death, reincarnated itself into a new bull.
Rameses II initiated Apis burials in what is now known as the Serapeum, an underground complex of burial chambers at Saqqara for the sacred bulls, a site used through the rest of Egyptian history into the reign of Cleopatra VII.
www.reference.com /browse/wiki/Apis_(Egyptian_mythology)   (1170 words)

  
 Virtual Egyptian - Bronze statuette of Apis, Late Period
Apis (Hapi in Egyptian) was a live bull kept in the temple of Ptah, in Memphis.
Apis was enthroned in an elaborate ceremony, led out of the hall through the eastern (rising sun) door, and finally presented to the people massed outside for their first glimpse of the newly reincarnated god.
Apis’ birthday was celebrated in a seven-day festival during which he was brought out of his sanctuary and led in processions through the city, accompanied by a choir of singing boys.
www.virtualegypt.org /Collection/Content/MET.SS.00094.html   (1971 words)

  
 Egyptian Mythology   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-09-17)
Apep is an evil serpant in ancient Egyptian mythology.
Athor (Hathor, Hat-Her) was an Egyptian goddess symbolised by a cow with a solar disk on its head and haw-feather plumes.
In Egyptian mythology, Hapi was the personification of the Nile.
www.ii.uj.edu.pl /~artur/enc/D2.htm   (809 words)

  
 Ptah - Biocrawler   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-09-17)
In Egyptian mythology, Ptah ("creator") (or Tanen or Ta-tenen or Tathenen or Peteh) is a creator god and originally the chief god in the pantheon of Memphis, Egypt.
In the Memphite mythology, he is considered to be the head of creators and the sole creator of the entire world and everything within, having dreamt creation in his heart, and by speaking it, making it real.
As the chief god, it was considered that Apis, the bull that represented the pharoah, was part of the soul of Ptah.
www.biocrawler.com /encyclopedia/Ptah   (382 words)

  
 mat - Article and Reference from OnPedia.com
In Egyptian mythology, Mat was the goddess of truth, justice and order as well as a word referring to those concepts she represents.
Because it was the pharaoh's duty to ensure truth and justice, many of them were referred to as "Beloved of Mat." Mat is depicted as a woman with wings and an ostrich feather on her head, although sometimes just the feather would be shown.
In Duat, the Egyptian underworld, the hearts of the dead are weighed against Mat in the Hall of Two Truths.
www.onpedia.com /encyclopedia/Mat   (131 words)

  
 Apis (Egyptian mythology) Definition / Apis (Egyptian mythology) Research   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-09-17)
In Egyptian mythologyEgyptian mythology (or Egyptian religion) is the name for the succession of beliefs held by the people of Egypt until the coming of Christianity and Islam.
Egyptian Mythology is different from Greek or Roman Mythology, in that in Egyptian Mythology most deities are of human...
His cult was associated at first with Ptah, and the underworld (DuatIn Egyptian mythology, Duat is the underworld, where the sun traveled from west to east during the night and where dead souls were judged by Osiris, using the Feather of Truth.
www.elresearch.com /Apis_(Egyptian_mythology)   (335 words)

  
 Mythology
Ancient Egyptians believed that the ka, or the body in the afterlife, could not survive unless the deceased person’s actual body was preserved.
The ancient Egyptians believed that their god of the dead, Anubis, was the inventor of embalming.
Burying the dead was of religious concern in Egypt, and Egyptian funerary rituals and equipment eventually became the most elaborate the world has ever known.
www.multimedia-publishing.com /mythology.htm   (1512 words)

  
 Serapis (Sarapis)
He was a composite of several Egyptian and Hellenistic deities who was introduced to the world at the beginning of the Ptolemaic (Greek) Period in Egypt during the reign of Ptolemy I, though his legacy lasted well into the Roman period.
Apis was, in fact, believed to be animated by the soul of Osiris, and to be Osiris incarnate.
The appearance of a new Apis was regarded as a new manifestation of Osiris upon earth.
www.touregypt.net /featurestories/serapis.htm   (1589 words)

  
 Ptah - One Language   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-09-17)
In Egyptian mythology, Ptah ("creator") is a creator god and patron deity of Memphis, Egypt, as well as craftsmen.
In art, he is portrayed as a mummified man with his hands holding a sceptre adorned with an ankh, was and djed (symbols of life, power and stability, respectively).
In the Memphite mythology, he is considered to be the head of creators and the sole creator of the entire world and everything within.
www.onelang.com /encyclopedia/index.php/Ptah   (229 words)

  
 Apis: Definition and Links by Encyclopedian.com
...Apis Apis In Egyptian mythology, Apis was the bull god of Memphis, Egypt.
Table of contents 1 Organization of the APIs...of the APIs The classes in the Java APIs are organized into separate groups called...
In Egyptian mythology, Apis was the bull god of Memphis, Egypt.
www.encyclopedian.com /ha/Hap.html   (206 words)

  
 Ancient Egypt: the Mythology - Colors
Apart from these practical considerations though, it is safe to say that the Egyptian use of color in their art was largely symbolic.
During celebrations, ancient Egyptians would paint their bodies with red ochre and would wear amulets made of cornelian, a deep red stone.
Red was commonly used to symbolize the fiery nature of the radiant sun and serpent amulets representing the "Eye of Re" (the fiery, protective, and possibly malevolent aspect of the sun) were made of red stones.
www.egyptianmyths.net /colors.htm   (1281 words)

  
 Apis - Free Encyclopedia of Thelema
Apis was the bull-god that, on reaching the age of twenty-eight, the age when Osiris was killed by Typhon, was put to death with a great ceremony.
By the New Kingdom, the remains of the Apis bulls were interred at the cemetery of Saqqara.
Rameses II initiated Apis burials in the Serapeum, an underground complex of burial chambers at Saqqara for the sacred bulls, a site used through the rest of Egyptian history into the reignof Cleopatra VII.
www.egnu.org /thelema/index.php/Apis   (329 words)

  
 Mythology
Egyptian Mythology, the body of beliefs constituting religion in ancient Egypt.
The gods were also represented by symbols, such as the sun disc and hawk wings that were worn on the headdress of the pharaoh.
Beginning with the Middle Kingdom (2134-1668 BC), Ra worship acquired the status of a state religion, and the god was gradually fused with Amon during the Theban dynasties, becoming the supreme god Amon-Ra.
www.nileriver.com /nile/nileinfo/Mythology.htm   (1174 words)

  
 In Egyptian mythology Egyptian mythology Apis or Hap was the bull...
In Egyptian mythology Egyptian mythology Apis or Hap was the bull...
In Egyptian mythology Egyptian mythology, "Apis" (or "Hap") was the bull bull god of Memphis, Egypt Memphis, Egypt.
In Greek mythology Greek mythology, "Apis" is the ruler of Apia Apia, a prophet prophet, the son of Phoroneus Phoroneus and Teledyne Teledyne.
www.biodatabase.de /Apis   (163 words)

  
 Apis - FFXIclopedia   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-09-17)
In Egyptian mythology, Apis was a sacred bull.
It was a large fl bull with special markings on it, specifically a white triangle on the forehead, and white markings on the back resembling the outline of vulture's wings, a white crescent moon on its right flank, a scarab shaped mark on the lower side of its tongue, and double hairs on its tail.
The Apis early in Egyptian mythological history was considered the Ka (power, spirit, lifeforce) of Ptah, patron deity of Memphis and creator of the world (he was depicted as a mummified man with a fake beard, skullcap, and holding a staff which combined an ankh, djed, and was).
www.wiki.ffxiclopedia.org /index.php/Apis   (353 words)

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