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Topic: Apparent magnitude


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  Apparent magnitude - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
The apparent magnitude (m) of a star, planet or other celestial body is a measure of its apparent brightness as seen by an observer on Earth.
The rate at which apparent brightness changes, as the distance from an object increases, is calculated by the inverse-square law (at cosmological distance scales, this is no longer quite true because of the curvature of space).
The absolute magnitude, M, of a star or galaxy is the apparent magnitude it would have if it were 10 parsecs (~ 32 lightyears) away; that of a planet (or other solar system body) is the apparent magnitude it would have if it were 1 astronomical unit away from both the Sun and Earth.
en.wikipedia.org /wiki/Stellar_magnitude   (1187 words)

  
 apparent magnitude concept from the Astronomy knowledge base   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-10-22)
The brightest star of all, of course, is the Sun, whose apparent magnitude is -26.74, followed by Sirius, whose apparent magnitude is -1.46, Canopus (-0.72), Alpha Centauri (-0.27), Arcturus (-0.04), and Vega (+0.03).
photographic magnitude (2 facts) - The magnitude of an object as measured on the traditional photographic emulsions, which are sensitive to a slightly bluer region of the spectrum than is the human eye.
photovisual magnitude (2 facts) - The magnitude of an object as measured photographically by filters and emulsions that are sensitive to the same region of the spectrum as the human eye.
www.site.uottawa.ca:4321 /astronomy/apparentmagnitude.html   (287 words)

  
 Encyclopedia: Apparent magnitude
In astronomy, absolute magnitude is the apparent magnitude, m, an object would have if it were at a standard luminosity distance away from us.
The apparent magnitude (m) of a star, planet or other heavenly body is a measure of its apparent brightness ; that is, its brightness without regard to the object's distance from a point of observation.
The absolute magnitude, M, of an object, is the apparent magnitude it would have if it were 10 parsecs away.
www.nationmaster.com /encyclopedia/Apparent-magnitude   (2754 words)

  
 Magnitude
Apparent magnitude is the brightness of an object as it appears to an observer on Earth.
The apparent magnitude discussed so far, that is the brightness as seen from the Earth, depends on both the intrinsic luminosity and the distance of objects.
Photographic magnitude is the magnitude measured by a standard photographic emulsion, which responds chiefly to the blue and violet part of the spectrum (although different photographic materials have very different colour responses).
www.historyoftheuniverse.com /magnitude.html   (618 words)

  
 Essays Page
Expressions of magnitude are used primarily in the visible, near-infrared, and near-ultraviolet regions of the spectrum.
The apparent magnitude, symbol: m, is a measure of the brightness of a star, etc., as observed from Earth.
Apparent magnitude is a measure of the radiation in a particular wavelength band, say of blue light, received from the celestial body.
www.fofweb.com /Subscription/Science/Helicon.asp?SID=2&iPin=ffdastron1973   (920 words)

  
 Wikinfo | Apparent magnitude
The apparent magnitude (m) of a star, planet or other heavenly body is a measure of its apparent brightness; that is, its brightness without regard to the object's distance from a point of observation.
The rate at which apparent brightness changes, as the distance from an object increases, is calculated by the inverse-square law.
The brightest stars were said to be of first magnitude (m = +1), those which were only half as bright were of second magnitude, and so on up to sixth magnitude (m = +6), the limit of human visual perception (without a telescope or the like).
www.wikinfo.org /wiki.php?title=Apparent_magnitude   (843 words)

  
 apparent magnitude Comparison Table   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-10-22)
The magnitude of an object as measured with a photoelectric photometer.
The magnitude of an object as measured on the traditional photographic emulsions, which are sensitive to a slightly bluer region of the spectrum than is the human eye.
The magnitude of an object as measured photographically by filters and emulsions that are sensitive to the same region of the spectrum as the human eye.
www.csi.uottawa.ca:4321 /astronomy/apparentmagnitude_table.html   (91 words)

  
 Apparent magnitude : Stellar magnitude   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-10-22)
The apparent magnitude of a star, planet or other heavenly body is a measure of its brightness as seen from Earth.
In 1856, Norman R. Pogson[?] noticed that the traditional system could be approximated by assuming that a difference of one magnitude corresponds to a brightness ratio equal to the fifth root of 100, so that a typical first magnitude star is 100 times brighter than a typical sixth magnitude star.
Magnitude is complicated by the fact that light isn't monochromatic.
www.termsdefined.net /st/stellar-magnitude.html   (936 words)

  
 Stellar Magnitudes
The former is a convolution of the true brightness and the effect of distance on the observed brightness, because the intensity of light from a source decreases as the square of the distance (the inverse square law).
However, the apparent magnitude is not so useful because it mixes up the intrinsic brightness of the star (which is related to its internal energy production) and the effect of distance (which has nothing to do with the intrinsic structure of the star).
The apparent magnitude of various objects determined using light from the visible part of the spectrum is given in the adjacent table.
csep10.phys.utk.edu /astr162/lect/stars/magnitudes.html   (802 words)

  
 STELLAR APPARENT MAGNITUDES
The apparent brightness of a visible star, called apparent magnitude, is designated by a number usually falling between 0 and 6.
A star with an apparent magnitude between 3.5 and 4.5 is called a 4th magnitude star.
The brighter the star, the lower its magnitude number: a first magnitude star is brighter than a second or third magnitude star, etc. Occasionally a magnitude may even be expressed as a negative value, and these are the brightest magnitudes of all.
homepage.mac.com /kvmagruder/bcp/aster/general/mag.htm   (425 words)

  
 Cool Cosmos
The apparent magnitude or apparent brightness of an object is a measure of how bright an object appears to be to an observer.
The apparent brightness of an object is measured in magnitudes.
Both the apparent and absolute brightness of objects in space will be different at different wavelengths, for example the infrared magnitude will not be the same as a visible light magnitude, however, the above formula still applies.
coolcosmos.ipac.caltech.edu /cosmic_classroom/cosmic_reference/luminosity.html   (535 words)

  
 Unit 5
The relation between apparent brightness and distance is governed by the inverse square law: the apparent brightness is inversely proportional to the distance to the object squared.
Apparent magnitude is a unit of measure that astronomers use to specify the apparent or perceived brightness of a star.
Photometry is the technique astronomers use to measure the apparent brightness (or apparent magnitude) of an object.
www.phyast.pitt.edu /~hamilton/astro89/unit05.htm   (1729 words)

  
 [No title]
1st magnitude described the brightest stars; 2nd magnitude the 2nd brightest, and so on down to 6th magnitude which described the faintest that could normally be seen by the naked eye.
Apparent magnitude is based on the actually intensity we measure on Earth.
Apparent magnitude depends on both the luminosity of the star (energy per unit time in the wavelength band of interest) and distance through the inverse-square law of light.
www.physics.unlv.edu /~jeffery/astro/magnitude/magnitude.html   (835 words)

  
 Stellar Magnitude
The magnitude scale, like the sensitivity of the naked eye, is logarithmic and, by convention, defined so that brighter stars have smaller magnitude values.
Absolute magnitude is the apparent magnitude that a star would have if it were located at a standard distance of 10 parsecs from the Earth.
Apparent and absolute magnitudes are measured by instruments sensitive to a small wavelength interval of the radiation continuum, such as the visual band: approximately 400 nm/7
www.peripatus.gen.nz /Astronomy/SteMag.html   (454 words)

  
 Zoom Astronomy Glossary: A
This scale is defined as the apparent magnitude a star would have if it were seen from a standard distance of 32.6 light-years (10 parsecs).
Apparent magnitude is a measure of the brightness of a celestial object as seen from Earth.
The apparent motion might be due to the movement of the object or themovement of the Earth.
www.enchantedlearning.com /subjects/astronomy/glossary   (4918 words)

  
 ESA Science & Technology: Stellar Distances
Comparing apparent magnitudes is a useful reference for astronomers, and these often appear next to stars on star maps.
Apparent magnitude, however, does not tell us about the intrinsic properties of the star, so it is necessary to use the concept of absolute magnitude.
The absolute magnitude, M, of a star is defined as what the apparent magnitude of that star would be if it were placed exactly 10 parsecs away from the Sun.
sci.esa.int /science-e/www/object/index.cfm?fobjectid=35616&fbodylongid=1664   (380 words)

  
 What Is Visual Magnitude?   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-10-22)
"Visual magnitude" is a scale used by astronomers to measure the brightness of a star.
This means a difference in magnitudes of 5 units (from magnitude 1 to magnitude 6, for example) corresponds to a change in brightness of 100 times.
Apparent magnitudes are often written with a lower case "m" (like 3.24m).
liftoff.msfc.nasa.gov /academy/universe/MAG.HTML   (385 words)

  
 Magnitude Scale
Absolute magnitude, M, expresses the brightness of a star as it would be ranked on the magnitude scale if it was placed 10 pc (32.6 ly) from the earth.
In his catalog of stars he classified their apparent magnitudes by rating the brightest star he could see as magnitude 1 and the faintest as magnitude 6.
Stars of first magnitude are 100 times brighter than stars of sixth magnitude; a difference of 5 magnitudes corresponds to a brightness ratio of 100.
www.astro-tom.com /technical_data/magnitude_scale.htm   (547 words)

  
 Apparent Magnitude   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-10-22)
Apparent magnitude describes how bright a star, planet or moon appears to be.
Magnitude is a ratio or light from one level to the next.
For Example a magnitude star of 1 is 2.5 times brighter than a 2 in the sky.
www.kinderscience.com /apparent_magnitude.htm   (355 words)

  
 Talk:Apparent magnitude - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
When amateurs refer to magnitude in astronomy, they probably don't know the difference between apparent magnitude and absolute magnitude.
I changed Magnitude (astronomy) to a disambiguation page with short descriptions for the two types of magnitudes.
I don't think that absolute magnitude is mentioned in many articles compared to apparent magnitude.
www.wikipedia.org /wiki/Talk:Apparent_magnitude   (328 words)

  
 Stars' Brightness   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-10-22)
A star brighter than another one by one magnitude puts out 2.5 times more light, it doesn't matter whether one is magnitude 3 and the other magnitude 4, or whether one is magnitude 26 and the other one is magnitude 27.
Presently, all magnitudes are measured with a photometer mounted on a telescope.
Absolute magnitude is related to the luminosity of the star, which is the amount of energy that a star gives off per second.
www.mira.org /fts0/stars/115/txt001w.htm   (1068 words)

  
 SkyEye - Brightest Stars
Thus, a star of magnitude -1 is brighter than one of magnitude +1 which in turn is brighter than one of magnitude +6.
Apparent magnitude is the brightness of a star as seen from Earth.
We use the apparent magnitudes of stars to form constellations but we use the absolute magnitudes of stars to tell us something about their physics.
www.obliquity.com /skyeye/misc/bright.html   (361 words)

  
 Properties of Stars
The other intervals of magnitude were based on the 19th century belief of how the human eye perceives differences in brightnesses.
On the quantified magnitude scale, a magnitude interval of 1 corresponds to a factor of 100
The apparent brightness of a star observed from the Earth is called the apparent magnitude.
www.astronomynotes.com /starprop/s4.htm   (1223 words)

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