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Topic: Apple I


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In the News (Sun 26 May 19)

  
  Apple
Hot News Headlines Read the latest news and information from Apple.
Shop the Apple Online Store (1-800-MY-APPLE), visit an Apple Retail Store, or find a reseller.
Copyright © 2007 Apple Inc. All rights reserved.
www.apple.com   (48 words)

  
  First Bytes into an Apple
The Apple I could be directly connected to a television with an RF modulator that resulted in a scrolling display with 24 lines of 40 characters each.
Apple II The Apple I would have a life span of less than a year, but its successor would live much longer.
Wozniak had begun work on the Apple II which, although based on the same 6502 microprocessor, was introduced as an integrated computer: it came in a beige plastic case, with a built-in keyboard.
www.kernelthread.com /mac/oshistory/1.html   (1024 words)

  
  Apple iPod (20GB; third generation) Reviews. MP3 players Reviews by CNET.
Unlike the earlier Apple iPod, which featured a standard FireWire port on top, the new iPod has a slot on its underside for connection to a proprietary cable or a docking station (a slot protector is included).
Apple won't release the signal-to-noise ratio, but the player sounds quite clean to our ears--even cleaner through the cradle's line-out jack, which bypasses the device's volume circuitry.
Apple claims the iPod's internal lithium-ion battery will last 8 hours, but that's with the button backlighting and the EQ turned off and the volume limited to 50 percent.
reviews.cnet.com /Apple_iPod_20GB_third_generation/4505-6490_7-20155133.html   (1421 words)

  
  Apple I - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
The Apple I is sometimes credited as the first personal computer to be sold in fully assembled form; however, some argue that the honour rightfully belongs to other machines, such as the Datapoint 2200.
The Apple I's use of a keyboard and monitor was distinctive.
A software-compatible clone of the Apple I (Replica I) produced using modern components, was released in 2003 at a price of around $200.
en.wikipedia.org /wiki/Apple_I   (366 words)

  
 Apple Computer - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
Apple's success with the Macintosh became a major influence in the development of graphical interfaces elsewhere, with major computer operating systems such as Microsoft Windows, the Commodore Amiga, Atari ST, all appearing on the market within two years of the introduction of the Macintosh.
Apple progressively abandoned flashy colors in favor of white polycarbonate for consumer lines such as the iMac and iBook, as well as the educational eMac, and metal enclosures for the professional lines.
Apple was one of several highly successful companies founded in the 1970s that bucked the traditional notions of what a corporate culture should look like in terms of organizational hierarchy (flat versus tall), casual versus formal attire, et cetera.
en.wikipedia.org /wiki/Apple_Computer   (7170 words)

  
 APPLE i
Apple incorporated on January 3, 1977 and moved to a separate building from the makeshift workshop in the garage of Jobs' parents' home (Carlton, 9-10).
The Apple I did not require the assembly of computer kits, but also did not come in a case.
A personal computer was more than an oxymoron; it was inconceivable to many even in the mainframe computer industry - a variously identified executive at Hewlett-Packard reportedly rejected Wozniak's offer of the Apple I design, saying that people would not want computers on their desks at home (Butcher, 63).
www.thocp.net /hardware/apple_1.htm   (284 words)

  
 Apple II History Chap 2
Jobs had recently worked at an organic apple orchard, and liked the name because "he thought of the apple as the perfect fruit--it has a high nutritional content, it comes in a nice package, it doesn't damage easily--and he wanted Apple to be the perfect company.
The advertisement Apple included with the card stated, "Our philosophy is to provide software for our machines free or at minimal cost." The interface worked, but it was tricky to get volume and tone on the cassette player properly adjusted to successfully load from cassettes.
However, if Apple BASIC was to be used, a hardware modification had to be made to the motherboard in order to move (logically) the 2nd 4K bank of RAM up to $E000-$EFFF (which was where BASIC was designed to operate).
www.apple2history.org /history/ah02.html   (3664 words)

  
 Wired News: 30 Years of Apple Products
This monster gallery of Apple's computers features most of the major products from the last three decades, and is adapted from the vast library at Apple-History.com.
The Apple I was based on the MOStek 6502 chip, whereas most other "kit" computers were built from the Intel 8080.
The Apple I was sold through several small retailers, and included only the circuit board.
wiredblogs.tripod.com /applehardware/index.html_i=1   (173 words)

  
 Apple II
The Apple II was designed on the original Apple I but was much more expandable, easier to use, and complete overall.
In August 1977, Apple agreed to pay $21,000 for an eight year license of Microsoft's Applesoft BASIC, designed by a then-teenage Randy Wigginton, who would later write MacWrite, and would be very influential in the creation of the Macintosh.
The Apple II could not live without Applesoft BASIC, and Apple could not live without the Apple II which was bringing in the majority of Apple's profits, so they killed the project.
applemuseum.bott.org /sections/computers/aII.html   (647 words)

  
 Apple - Uncyclopedia
Already weakened by its losses in the desktop wars, the stunning victories in the Battle of the i's may not be enough to offset this devastating split.
Apple is also a famous religion, but it is not considered as a sect.
Apple's primary goal is to turn America's children into Devil Worshipping Homosexuals.
uncyclopedia.org /wiki/Apple   (804 words)

  
 Taking on the iGoliath Biting the Apple I - Technology - RedOrbit   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-11-07)
Apple's market share in France, reported to be 40 percent, is not exactly monopolistic (although worldwide it does enjoy nearly 80 percent market share) and its store has formidable rivals, include Vivendi, Virgin, Sony, Microsoft and the European Internet companies Wanadoo and Tiscali.
Apple's defenders point out that a consumer can't get a car serviced at a proprietary garage that he has bought from a competitor.
Apple could take the wind out of the French sails and permit others to encode music with their digital rights management.
www.redorbit.com /news/technology/463513/taking_on_the_igoliath_biting_the_apple_i/index.html?source=r_technology   (737 words)

  
 History of the Apple Computer
By 1980, the Apple III was released and their company employed several thousand workers.
Apple and IBM had worked closely together for nearly a year of the PowerPC 970 Processor (publicly referred to as the G5), and the 64-bit PowerMac G5 represented a huge leap forward in both processor and machine design.
The rectangular case was reminiscent of the failed G4 Cube, the mistakes of which Apple seemed determined not to repeat with the mini.
www.thescreamonline.com /technology/applehistory/applehistory.html   (1780 words)

  
 OLD-COMPUTERS.COM : The Museum
The computer was easier to use than the Altair: notably, the Apple 1 had a keyboard connector and could display characters on a TV whereas the Altair used LEDs for display.
Apple was, at the time, a major purchaser of MOS 6502 processors and Commodore owned MOS Technologies.
The nowadays mythic Apple 1 was followed the next year by the Apple ][.
www.old-computers.com /museum/computer.asp?st=1&c=67   (289 words)

  
 Apple II computer   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-11-07)
In the spirit of the original computer hacker, the Apple II was also available as a circuit-board only, without keyboard, power supply, or case, as seen here on the right.
The Apple II was one of the first computer with a color display, and it has the BASIC programming language built-in, so it is ready-to-run right out of the box.
It was apparently released on the Apple II before any other system due to Apple's rather large memory size, since the Apple II could support up to 48K of RAM.
oldcomputers.net /appleii.html   (1292 words)

  
 The Apple Museum | 1980 - 1989
He is turned down by Michael Scott, president of Apple, who knew that Jobs was lacking the technical expertise.
He also informs them that five Apple employees are going to follow him to the new company.
February 1989: Apple Corps sues Apple Computer accusing it of violating the terms of the agreement of 1981 by building computers with the capability of producing synthesized music.
www.apple-museum.net /index.php?id=56   (969 words)

  
 Apple II History Chap 2
Jobs had recently worked at an organic apple orchard, and liked the name because "he thought of the apple as the perfect fruit--it has a high nutritional content, it comes in a nice package, it doesn't damage easily--and he wanted Apple to be the perfect company.
The advertisement Apple included with the card stated, "Our philosophy is to provide software for our machines free or at minimal cost." The interface worked, but it was tricky to get volume and tone on the cassette player properly adjusted to successfully load from cassettes.
However, if Apple BASIC was to be used, a hardware modification had to be made to the motherboard in order to move (logically) the 2nd 4K bank of RAM up to $E000-$EFFF (which was where BASIC was designed to operate).
apple2history.org /history/ah02.html   (3664 words)

  
 apple-history.com :: Apple I
The Apple I was Steven Wozniak's first contribution to the personal computer field.
The Apple I was based on the MOStek 6502 chip, whereas most other "kit" computers were built from the Intel 8080.
The Apple I was sold through several small retailers, and included only the circuit board.
www.apple-history.com /body.php?page=gallery&model=aI&performa=off&sort=date&order=ASC   (195 words)

  
 Apple ///
But Apple's senior management began to worry that the Apple II may run out of steam before the next generation of Apples projected for the mid 80's would be ready.
The requirement was made so the Apple III could be announced in time to prove that Apple was not a one-hit wonder and prop up it's stock before the IPO deadline in late 1980.
At first Apple ignored the initial feedback that there were problems with the Apple III, They were caught up in the IPO whirlwind.
www.myoldcomputers.com /museum/comp/appleiii.htm   (787 words)

  
 Macintosh Prehistory: The Apple I and Apple II Era
Wozniak agreed, and the Apple I was born.
Apple II While the Apple I was still available, Wozniak began to design the Apple II.
Both Apple and Nintendo remain committed to providing the best platform in their market, and neither company is afraid of innovation.
lowendmac.com /orchard/05/0509.html   (2737 words)

  
 Spartanburg SC | GoUpstate.com | Spartanburg Herald-Journal   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-11-07)
The Apple I was Apple's first product, demonstrated in April 1976 at the Homebrew Computer Club in Palo Alto, California.
The Apple I is sometimes credited as the first personal computer to be sold in fully assembled form; however, some argue that the honor rightfully belongs to other machines, such as the MOS Technology KIM-1, Datapoint 2200, or more commonly the Altair 8800 (which could be bought in kit or assembled form for extra cost).
Competing machines such as the Altair 8800 generally were programmed with front-mounted toggle switches and used indicator lights (red LEDs, most commonly) for output, and had to be extended with separate hardware to allow connection to a computer terminal or a teletype machine.
www.goupstate.com /apps/pbcs.dll/section?category=NEWS&template=wiki&text=Apple_I   (422 words)

  
 Book Review: "Apple I Replica Creation: Back to the Garage" - OSNews.com
It was not until 2005 that I heard of the famous Apple ]['s younger, lesser-known sibling.
The foreword is written by none other than the Apple I designer, Steve Wozniak or as he is affectionately referred to in Mac circles, "The Woz".
He gives the reader an introduction to the Apple I Replica's dialect of BASIC and follows that up with a dissection and complete Apple I source code of an Adventure game called Richard III - what the author calls a piece of interactive fiction.
www.osnews.com /story.php?news_id=10085   (1162 words)

  
 Steve Jobs and Steve Wozniak with the Apple I and the Apple IIc Computers
On April 1, 1976 Apple Computer Co. was formed, and in May 1976 the Apple I went on sale for $666.66 assembled with 4K of RAM.
The Apple I stood out among homebrew computers in using a keyboard and an ordinary video monitor as input and output devices, although neither of these were included in the base price.
This was shortly after the introduction of the Macintosh, so Apple wanted to assure dealers the Apple II would continue to be supported.
www.cedmagic.com /history/apple-1-2-steves.html   (194 words)

  
 Apple II History Museum - Articles
Steve Wozniak is the designer of the original Apple computer and one of the cofounders of Apple Computer Inc. Here Steve speaks at length on a variety of topics that range from the hobby activities that led to his design of the Apple I to current issues at Apple Computer.
He implemented a new voice chip design on an Apple II, and he said it was "because you don't have to decode it on the board." That was exactly the purpose behind the I/O decoding Alan and I designed.
The Apple II History is brought to you as a service of foreThought.net, providers of internet services for the value-minded business.
apple2history.org /museum/articles/byte8412/byte8412.html   (4529 words)

  
 The Apple Museum | 1976 - 1979
After being turned down, Jobs insists on producing the Apple I on their own so he sells his old Volkswagen Bus and Wozniak sells his beloved programmable HP calculator.
The three assemble the Apple Is at night in their garage and manage to deliver the ordered Apple Is in ten days.
Apple and Xerox sign an agreement that allows Xerox to invest one million dollars in Apple stocks (Apple goes public in 1980).
www.theapplemuseum.com /index.php?id=55   (601 words)

  
 Digg - You can buy an original Apple I
I guess the spell check isn't working on it, since that should be "You can buy AN original Apple I".
Anyhow on topic, that machine looks like it is in mint condition and I truly hope that a museum does get it.
Wish I still had that Apple II that I once owned, I wonder what that'd fetch on eBay.
www.digg.com /apple/You_can_buy_an_original_Apple_I   (520 words)

  
 SB-Projects: Apple 1, introduction
It's like riding a time machine, going back to when the Apple company was born, a little more than 30 years ago as of this writing.
OK we humans were still the ones who had to adapt the most, but from then on computers did their utmost to better integrate with us.
On the Apple 1 this human interface was controlled by the monitor program, better known as the Woz Monitor, named after its creator.
www.sbprojects.com /projects/apple1   (1010 words)

  
 Apple 1 computer   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-11-07)
This is also when they officially formed the "Apple Computer Company" - Jobs used to work in an apple orchard.
Only about 200 Apple 1 computers were made in total.
Excited by their success, Woz went on to design the Apple II - one of the greatest computers of all time.
www.oldcomputers.net /applei.html   (1077 words)

  
 Apple Computer History Links
This site attempts to "capture your Apple experiences, anecdotes and stories about key events in Apple's history." It is filled with a growing collection of stories by previous Apple employees.
Apple was in poor financial shape at the time.
Apple's first president Mike Scott presented this account at the September 12, 1978 meeting of the Call A.P.P.L.E. user group.
www.landsnail.com /apple/links.htm   (2413 words)

  
 significance of the Apple II | Apple's 30th Anniversary | Richard Rucker
The first Apple IIs shipped with an Apple II Reference Manual containing a complete schematic of the entire computer's circuitry and a complete source listing of the "Monitor" ROM firmware that served as the machine's BIOS.
Similar techniques were used for cassette storage: the cassette output worked the same as the speaker, and the input was a simple zero-crossing detector that served as a very crude (1-bit) audio digitizer.
Apple II peripheral cards such as Serial controllers, improved display controllers, memory boards, hard disks, and networking components were available for this system in its day.
mysite.verizon.net /rrucker/apple_30/looking_back/significance_of_the_apple_i.html   (801 words)

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