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Topic: Apricot


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  Apricot - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-10-07)
The apricot is a fruit bearing tree of the species Prunus armeniaca, in the same subgenus as the plum (Prunophora), and also the name of the fruit it produces.
The apricot tree is small to medium sized and produces a spreading, dense canopy; its leaves are shaped somewhat like a heart, with pointed tips, and about 8 cm (1/3 inch) wide.
As early as AD 502 apricot seeds were used to treat tumors and in the 17th century apricot oil was used in England against tumors and ulcers.
moorpark.us /project/wikipedia/index.php/Apricot   (491 words)

  
 Encyclopedia: Apricot
In Europe, apricots were long considered an aphrodisiac, and is used in this context in William Shakespeare's A Midsummer Night's Dream, and as an inducer of labour, used in John Webster's The Duchess of Malfi for this purpose.
Apricot seeds contain the highest amounts of these cyanide generating compounds, and the cancer drug laetrile is derived from this source.
Apricot culture is most successful in mild, Mediterranean climates where the danger of spring frost is limited, and disease pressure is reduced.
www.nationmaster.com /encyclopedia/Apricot   (2448 words)

  
 AllRefer.com - apricot, Plant (Plants) - Encyclopedia
apricot [Arabic from Lat.,=early ripe], tree, Prunus armeniaca, and its fruit, of the plum genus of the family Rosaceae (rose family), native to temperate Asia and long cultivated in Armenia.
Apricots are used in the making of a cordial and also for apricot brandy.
Apricots are classified in the division Magnoliophyta, class Magnoliopsida, order Rosales, family Rosaceae.
reference.allrefer.com /encyclopedia/A/apricot.html   (202 words)

  
 Gale Encyclopedia of Alternative Medicine: Apricot seed
Apricot seed is the small kernel enclosed within the wood-like pit at the center of the apricot fruit.
Although the oil from apricot seeds usually breaks down into a toxic substance capable of causing death within the human body, there are also varieties of apricot seed that are reported to be edible.
Because the oil from the apricot seed is far less expensive than oil of almond, confectioners use it in place of bitter almond oil for flavoring sweets and as a culinary seasoning.
www.findarticles.com /p/articles/mi_g2603/is_0000/ai_2603000010   (1211 words)

  
 Apricot at opensource encyclopedia   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-10-07)
While English settlers brought the apricot to the English colonies in the New Word, most of modern American production of apricots comes from the seedlings carried to the west coast by Spanish Missionaries.
In Europe, apricots were long considered an aphrodisiac, and is used in this context in William Shakespeare's A Midsummer Night's Dream and Webster's The Duchess of Malfi.
"Apricot" in world wide web people finder »
wiki.tatet.com /Apricot.html   (343 words)

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