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Topic: Apries


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In the News (Sun 18 Nov 18)

  
  Apries - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
Apries (Egyptian Wahibre) was a pharaoh of Egypt, (589 BC-570 BC) of the Twenty-sixth dynasty of Egypt.
Apries inherited the throne from his father, the undistingished Psammetichus II and continued his poor military record.
Apries was killed in a conflict with his eventual successor Amasis II, a former general who had declared himself pharaoh.
en.wikipedia.org /wiki/Apries   (152 words)

  
 Egypt: God's Wife of Amun
The King commonly referred to as Apries (his Greek name), who's birth name was Wah-ib-re, meaning "Constant is the Heart of Re" and who's Throne name was Haa-ib-re, meaning "Jubilant is the Heart of Re Forever", succeeded his father, Psamtik II in February of 589 BC., of Egypt's 26th Dynasty.
Apris was blamed for this disaster, resulting in a confrontation between the regular Egyptian army (the machimoi) and foreign mercenaries (Greek) under his command.
When Apris sent his general, Amasis (Ahmose II) to put down the revolt, instead he was implored by the Egyptians instead to be their leader, a plead which he accepted.
touregypt.net /featurestories/apries.htm   (688 words)

  
 [No title]   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-11-07)
Then Apries having heard this also, armed his foreign mercenaries and marched against the Egyptians: now he had about him Carian and ionian mercenaries to the number of thirty thousand; and his royal palace was in the city of Sais, of great size and worthy to be seen.
So when Apries leading his foreign mercenaries, and Amasis at the head of the whole body of the Egyptians, in their approach to one another had come to the city of Momemphis, they engaged battle: and although the foreign troops fought well, yet being much inferior in number they were worsted by reason of this.
Apries having thus been overthrown, Amasis became king, being of the district of Sais, and the name of the city whence he was is Siuph.
www.gruntose.com /Info/Books/Herodotus/account_of_egypt_6.txt   (1301 words)

  
 Herodotus on Apries   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-11-07)
Hearing of this, too, Apries armed his mercenaries and marched against the Egyptians; he had a bodyguard of Carians and Ionians, numbering thirty thousand, and his royal palace was in the city of Sais, a great and worthy palace.
So when Apries leading his foreign mercenaries, and Amasis at the head of the army of Egyptians, in their approach to one another had reached the city of Momemphis, they engaged in battle: and although the foreign mercenaries fought well, yet being much inferior in number they were defeated because of this.
But Apries is said to have supposed that not even a god would be able to cause him to lose his rule, so firmly did he think that it was established.
nefertiti.iwebland.com /herodotus/apries.htm   (643 words)

  
 [No title]
Since Apries was the recognized king it was natural for Herodotus to assume that he, not Amasis, resided in the capital city, and that Amasis was the challenger, invading from without the capital.
And Apries is not the opponent of Amasis.
The fact that Apries died in the conflict is at least suggestive of the fact that Amasis' brief attempt at rebellion, or resistance, ended in failure.
www.kent.net /DisplacedDynasties/Amasis_&_Apries.htm   (6329 words)

  
 [No title]
Alternatively, Apries may have begun strengthening his defensive fortifications in the years immediately preceding the outbreak of hostilities in anticipation of the need for a sanctuary.
Apries' dates in the traditional history are 589-570 B.C. Nebuchadrezzar controlled the eastern Mediterranean.
This was apparently in his (Apries') Nubian war, which is undated, but is described on the statue of his general, Nes'hor, who records that he overcame the Amu, Hanebu, and Sati, who probably belonged to the Egyptian mercenaries of the southern frontier...
www.kent.net /DisplacedDynasties/Inaros_&_His_Contemporaries.htm   (6401 words)

  
 Apries -- Facts, Info, and Encyclopedia article   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-11-07)
Apries inherited the throne from his father, the undistingished (Click link for more info and facts about Psammetichus II) Psammetichus II and continued his poor military record.
Unsuccessful attempts to intervene in (A British mandate on the east coast of the Mediterranean; divided between Jordan and Israel in 1948) Palestine were followed by a mutiny of soldiers at (An ancient city on the Nile in Egypt; site of the Aswan High Dam) Aswan.
Apries was killed in a conflict with his eventual successor (Click link for more info and facts about Amasis II) Amasis II, a former general who had declared himself pharaoh.
www.absoluteastronomy.com /encyclopedia/a/ap/apries.htm   (191 words)

  
 Belschazzar
It concerns one Count Ramose the Egyptian (aka Ptahmes), son of Apries, Pharaoh of Egypt.
Apries was known to the Greeks, who dominated the Court, by that name.
The young Count Ramose, whom Pharaoh Apries wished to favour, was entrusted with greeting Queen Atyra, widow of Abibal, a king of Syria, who had come to Egypt to ask for aid against the Babylonians who were attacking Syria.
www.geocities.com /noelcox/Belschazzar.htm   (1619 words)

  
 amasis ii   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-11-07)
These troops, returning home from a disastrous expedition to Cyrene, suspected that they had been betrayed in order that Apries, the reigning king, might rule more absolutely by means of his mercenaries, and their friends in Egypt fully sympathized with them.
An inscription confirms the fact of the struggle between the native and the foreign soldiery, and proves that Apries was killed and honourably buried in the 3rd year of Amasis.
At the beginning of his long reign, before the death of Apries, he appears to have sustained an attack by Nebuchadnezzar (568 BC).
www.yourencyclopedia.net /Amasis_II.html   (461 words)

  
 AMASIS - LoveToKnow Article on AMASIS   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-11-07)
An inscription confirms the fact of the struggle between the native and the foreign soldiery, and proves that Apries was killed and honorably buried in the 3rd year of Amasis.
At the beginning of his long reign, before the death of Apries, he appears to have sustained an attack by Nebuchadrezzar (568 B.C.).
Cyrus left Egypt unmolested; but the last years of Amasis were disturbed by the threatened invasion of Cambyses and by the rupture of the alliance with Polycrates of Samos.
www.1911encyclopedia.org /A/AM/AMASIS.htm   (836 words)

  
 Egyptian Pharaohs : Late Kingdom : Dynasty 26 : Apries
But Apries continued his military exploits farther afield, as far as Cyrene and battles against the greeks.
Then, despite years of conflict with Babylon, Apries allied with them, returned to Egypt with the Babylonian army and tried to retake the throne.
In either case, he was buried with all the honors of a king in Sais.
www.phouka.com /pharaoh/pharaoh/dynasties/dyn26/05apries.html   (150 words)

  
 Egypt: Amasis, the Last Great Egyptian Pharaoh   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-11-07)
From Herodutus, we learn that he was a likeable, popular ruler who is said to have had such a strong inclination for drink that he sometimes delayed state matters in order to indulge in a drinking bout.
Yet Apries was not content with this, and aided by his Greek troops, once again marched on Amasis in October of 570 BC, where he was once again defeated by his former general.
Prior to Apries' defeat, the Greek mercenaries were established in camps between Babastis and the sea on the Pelusiac branch of the Nile, where Herodotus tells us they had remained for over a century.
www.bonus.com /contour/egytptian_safari/http@@/www.touregypt.net/featurestories/amasis.htm   (1256 words)

  
 The Revolt Spreads   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-11-07)
Apries, however, is so angry on seeing that Amasis has not been brought back that he gives Patarbemis no opportunity to explain, and has his ears and nose cut off.
Apries' ill treatment of such a distinguished man as Patarbemis appalls even his supporters, and they go over to Amasis.
Apries' throne is tottering; he has lost his domestic support, and now can rely only on his hired troops.
www.du.edu /~etuttle/classics/h162c.htm   (276 words)

  
 Herodotus - The Histories - Page 380
Apries, on learning these circumstances, sent Amasis to the rebels, to appease the tumult by persuasion.
Upon his arrival, as he was seeking to restrain the malcontents by his exhortations, one of them, coming behind him, put a helmet on his head, saying, as he put it on, that he thereby crowned him king.
Apries, however, when he saw him approaching without Amasis, fell into a paroxysm of rage; and not giving himself time for reflection, commanded the nose and ears of Patarbemis to be cut off.
www.galileolibrary.com /ebooks/eu04/herodotus_page_380.htm   (226 words)

  
 Al-Ahram Weekly | Heritage | Capital names   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-11-07)
Only the palace of Apries, a type of platform reinforced by mud-brick cells or divisions that were filled with debris, broken pottery, stone chips and domestic rubbish, remained visible.
It was topped by a huge structure attributed to Apries, based on crude cartouches bearing his name on segments of limestone columns and palm capitals that lie scattered on the top.
Besides a citadel of Apries, the presence of administrative headquarters during the earlier Persian period is suggested by the discovery of Aramaic dockets and seals.
weekly.ahram.org.eg /2003/629/hr1.htm   (1789 words)

  
 Cambyses II - OnlineEncyclopedia   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-11-07)
Here Cambyses is made the legitimate son of Cyrus and a daughter of Apries named Nitetis (Herod.
Cambyses wants to marry a daughter of Amasis, who sends him a daughter of Apries instead of his own daughter, and by her Cambyses is induced to begin the war.
His great crime is the killing of the Apis bull, for which he is punished by madness, in which he commits many other crimes, kills his brother and his sister, and at last loses his empire and dies from a wound in the hip, at the same place where he had wounded the sacred animal.
www.neareasternarchaeology.com /encyclopedia/index.php/Kambujiya_II   (980 words)

  
 [No title]   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-11-07)
For Apries, wishing to do well by her, had given her in marriage to a wealthy Egyptian named Tapert, who was one of his officers at Memphis where he filled the place of a judge and overseer of revenues.
An interpreter began to render her words, but Apries, waving him aside, answered her in the same tongue which he knew as well as he did his own, having learned it from my mother and others.
"Apries your father is in an evil mood; even our great victory over the Babylonians does not rejoice him overmuch; almost might one think that he would have been better pleased had we been driven back, perhaps because he thinks that a certain general is more talked of in Egypt to-day, than is Pharaoh's self.
gutenberg.net.au /ebooks03/0300971.txt   (21611 words)

  
 Amasis Becomes Pharaoh   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-11-07)
Apries' Greek mercenaries are too few to carry the day, and Amasis' Egyptians overwhelm them, capturing Apries.
And then Apries, leading the mercenaries, and Amasis all the Egyptians, coming together arrived in the town of Momemphis and clashed.
It is said that Apries had the belief that not even a god had the power to end his rule.
www.du.edu /~etuttle/classics/h169a.htm   (294 words)

  
 Herodotus' Inquiries, Book 2: installment 14
But, after Apries had learned that by inquiry, he sent to Amasis an esteemed man of the Egyptians round himself, whose name was Patarbemis, and enjoined on him to bring Amasis alive to himself.
Then, when they, in going together, Apries leading the auxiliaries and Amasis all Egyptians, had come to the city of Momemphis, they engaged in an encounter and the foreigners, although they had fought well, yet, since they were far fewer in multitude, because of that were worsted.
When Apries had been put down, Amasis became king, who was of the district of Sais, and as for the city from which he was, its name is Siouph.
www.losttrails.com /pages/Tales/Inquiries/Herodotus_14.html   (2458 words)

  
 Apries
Apries main actions were on the international level, as he played a central part in the fall of Judah to Babylonia.
King Zedekiah of Judah was his ally, but he did not intervene to help when Judah was attacked.
Apries had one military victory, when he conquered Sidon of Phoenicia.
lexicorient.com /e.o/apries.htm   (125 words)

  
 [No title]
Under the gray mud hill, close to the squalid Arab village of Mitrahenny, which every tourist passes on the way to Sakkhara, had lain for centuries Hophra's magnificent palace, 400 ft. long by 200 ft., with a splendid pylon, an immense court, and stonelined halls, of which seven have been found intact.
It is said to be of the finest workmanship of the time of Apries, a relic of the fire, which, Jeremiah predicted at Tahpanhes, the Lord of Hosts was to kindle "in the houses of the gods of Egypt" (Jeremiah 43:12).
Pharaoh Hophra, as Jeremiah prophesied (Jeremiah 44:29 f.), became the victim of a revolt and was finally strangled.
bibletools.org /index.cfm/fuseaction/Def.show/RTD/isbe/ID/6860/printer/friendly   (544 words)

  
 Relief of Apries [Egyptian] (09.183.1a) | Object Page | Timeline of Art History | The Metropolitan Museum of Art   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-11-07)
Apries, sixth king of the Saite Dynasty 26, spent much of his reign at war with the Babylonian ruler Nebuchadnezzar II.
After suffering huge losses at the Battle of Cyrene, the Egyptian army under Amasis revolted and Apries was forced to flee.
Part of a monumental gateway, they depict Apries in the regalia of the sed festival or jubilee, one of the oldest Egyptian rituals, and the costumes and poses are clearly taken from Old Kingdom examples.
www.metmuseum.org /toah/hd/lapd/hod_09.183.1a.htm   (187 words)

  
 anything but ordinary: I Fart In Your General Direction   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-11-07)
In 568 B.C., King Apries of Egypt sent his trusted general, Amasis, to stifle a mutiny among his troops.
When the mutineers made Amasis their leader, Apries sent an adviser to retrieve his general.
Amasis’s response: He raised himself from his saddle, farted, and then told the adviser to “carry that back to Apries.” The king was so enraged that he had the adviser’s nose and ears hacked off.
www.geekgrrl.com /archives/2004/03/i_fart_in_your.php   (167 words)

  
 Apries --¬† Britannica Concise Encyclopedia¬†- The online encyclopedia you can trust!   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-11-07)
Apries failed to help his ally King Zedekiah of Judah against Babylon, but after the fall of Jerusalem he received many Jewish refugees into Egypt.
Later he took the Phoenician port of Sidon, but, because of his subsequent failure in an attack on Cyrene in Libya, the Egyptian army mutinied and elected their general Ahmose as king instead (570).
Apries was imprisoned but escaped; he later was murdered, perhaps by Egyptians.
www.britannica.com /ebc/article-9008094   (312 words)

  
 Egypt: Herodotus on Apries
Psammis reigned over Egypt for only six years; he invaded Ethiopia, and immediately thereafter died, and Apries the son of Psammis reigned in his place.
Apries sent Amasis to dissuade them, when he heard of this.
This wasn't unwelcome to Amasis and for after being crowned king by the rebelling Egyptians he prepared to march against Apries.
www.touregypt.net /herodotusonapries.htm   (627 words)

  
 The Confusion of the 26th and 19th Dynasty Kings and the Solution
Wahibre is the conventional, Hebrew Pharaoh Apries, known to the Greeks as Psammetichus.
We assume that the hieroglyphics read not `Apries' but rather `Wahibre' who is said to have been `Apries' since it is unlikely that the Egyptians would write a Greek name.
When Zed-Khonsu-ef-ankh is said to have built temples to 26th Dynasty kings and then the names `Apries' and `Ahmose II (Khnemibre)' are mentioned, we must understand again that the names actually found are those of individuals interpreted to be kings Apries and Amose II.
www.specialtyinterests.net /dyn26.html   (5861 words)

  
 king Apries
The captivity of the Jews (capture of Jerusalem and deportation of the population to Babylon) occurred during the reign of Apries (in 586 BC): many managed to flee to Egypt, where they settled at Elephantine, among other places.
Apries went into exile, and returned with a Babylonian army, but was defeated.
Apries was killed, but Ahmose buried him as king in Sais.
www.digitalegypt.ucl.ac.uk /chronology/wahibre.html   (265 words)

  
 apries - OneLook Dictionary Search
Tip: Click on the first link on a line below to go directly to a page where "apries" is defined.
Apries : Columbia Encyclopedia, Six Edition [home, info]
APRIES : 1911 edition of the Encyclopedia Britannica [home, info]
www.onelook.com /?w=apries   (94 words)

  
 Dictionary of Greek and Roman Biography and Mythology, page 251 (v. 1)   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-11-07)
The two other grammatical treatises above mentioned were probably written in the tenth century of our aera.
APRIES ('ATrpiV, 'Airpias), a king of Egypt, ;he 8th of the 26th (Sai'te) dynasty, the Pharaoh-Hophra of Scripture (Ixx.
f the failure of an expedition which Apries had
ancientlibrary.com /smith-bio/0260.html   (912 words)

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